GREENVILLE, SC / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / World Finance, a people-focused finance company that provides personal installment loan solutions and personal tax preparation services, today announced that it has been honored as a 2020 Top Workplace …

GREENVILLE, SC / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / World Finance, a people-focused finance company that provides personal installment loan solutions and personal tax preparation services, today announced that it has been honored as a 2020 Top Workplace …

GREENVILLE, SC / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / World Finance, a people-focused finance company that provides personal installment loan solutions and personal tax preparation services, today announced that it has been honored as a 2020 Top Workplace in states and cities across the country, including in New Mexico, South Carolina and, most recently, San Antonio, Texas.

The independent awards were presented by local media publishers across three states in partnership with Energage, and were based on scientific, anonymous surveys of employees measuring 15 drivers of company culture. In South Carolina, where World Finance is headquartered, the company was ranked as a Top 5 Large Company and also received a special award in Communication, based on standout scores in that category.

“We are honored by these recognitions, especially since they are based on our employees’ experiences across the country,” said Chad Prashad, president and CEO of World Finance. “We know how hard our employees work to further our mission of helping customers get back to the good in life, and we want to foster a culture that makes staff proud to be a part of our team.”

In 2016, World Finance launched a concerted employee engagement effort to ensure culture and communication were core functions of the company. Efforts stemming from that initiative have included the establishment of the

Levi Strauss & Co. (LEVI) has laid the groundwork to execute on a big new financial goal put forth by its CFO Harmit Singh.

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Get back to pre-COVID 19 annual sales (or in this case, 2019 levels) by the second half of 2021. And in doing so, bring back the dividend after doing away with it in the current quarter.

“I believe the pandemic is actually raising the casualization of the workplace,” Singh told Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade about his mission fresh off Levi’s third quarter earnings release Tuesday evening. “Casualization and the focus on clothing will benefit us.”

To that end, Levi’s has just put some new stakes in the ground in an effort to reach Singh’s goal.

Target announced Tuesday it will expand its offerings of Levi’s Red Tab label jeans to more than 500 locations by next fall from 140 currently. Meanwhile, Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh and Singh disclosed to analysts on the earnings call it’s now testing premium-priced jeans, jackets and shirts at 11 flagship Dick’s Sporting Goods locations and online. Dick’s marks a new partner for Levi’s.



Levi's is expanding at Target stores in the U.S. [Credit: Target]


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Levi’s is expanding at Target stores in the U.S. [Credit: Target]

The company has also taken the wraps off Levi’s Secondhand, allowing shoppers to buy pre-owned jeans and jackets. Shoppers could also turn in their used clothing for credit toward new purchases. The apparel resale market is valued at about $28 billion today, but ThredUP believes it could reach $64 billion by 2024 as shoppers focus more on sustainability.

That said, Levi’s does have a lot of clawing back to do on the top line as the pandemic continues to weigh on store shopping trends globally.

Levi’s third quarter sales fell 27% year-over-year to $1.06 billion. Sales and operating profits

Rebecca is CEO of LearnLux, a financial well-being company that helps employees feel great about their money so their work & wellness thrive

Employees typically don’t know how to talk about money. It’s something we all need to know but are usually never taught. In some families, it’s a total taboo. I hear the shame, confusion and discomfort each time personal finances come up. People get anxious, they change the subject and what isn’t said is much more impactful than what anyone actually says out loud. We learn from a young age that money is one of those subjects that shouldn’t be talked about because it’s private and personal and no one’s business. Instead, I believe this needs to be a focus for every business because we’re all dealing with money every day. Avoiding it is contributing to stress levels that are unsustainable, at work and at home, but change is possible. Employees need support to feel good about their finances, and employers have a responsibility to help enable this. It starts by talking about it.

In my experience, the silence surrounding money only compounds the problem. Shame plus silence is a recipe for trouble and leaves us feeling alone and isolated while those around us are having the same issues. But most importantly, we can’t get guidance for issues we can’t talk about. Since avoidance is not the answer, now is the time to get talking about how we manage our money in this pandemic and economic uncertainty-filled world.

I recently had a conversation with an executive in Human Resources who was struggling with how to use financial well-being benefits to support her team. She didn’t know where to begin the conversation because it all seemed too complicated. I told her that she was illustrating the problem

Volkswagen AG

is betting that a reformed compliance culture and an expanded whistleblower program that helped the German car maker clear a critical U.S. regulatory milestone this month will also help prevent another scandal and go a long way in restoring its reputation.

The car maker has spent the past few years trying to resolve issues related to its 2015 admission that it rigged about 11 million of its diesel vehicles world-wide with software to dodge government emissions tests, a revelation that came after U.S. regulators alleged that Volkswagen installed software to make cars appear to run cleaner.

The company says its yearslong, multipronged transformation and ongoing surveillance are essential to its survival. Getting that point across to employees is easier when you can put a price tag on noncompliance: €32 billion ($37.56 billion) in fines, penalties and compensation to customers, said Hiltrud D. Werner, the member of Volkswagen’s board of management in charge of compliance, risk management and legal affairs.

“Then you can explain, ‘Look, we don’t want another scandal. We cannot survive another scandal,’ ” she said in an interview.

Some investors and analysts say they remain cautious about whether the kind of cultural transformation described by the company can be fully realized in a global enterprise with more than 600,000 people.

“You can’t guarantee a change of culture,” said Philippe Houchois, an analyst at Jefferies Financial Group Inc. “It’s not up to the regulators to change the aspect of governance; it’s up to shareholders to decide if they are happy with the governance or not.”

For Volkswagen, it has been a long journey from when the emissions scandal first surfaced. At that time, it took the German car