Kate Danella, head of Strategic Planning and Consumer Bank Products and Origination Partnerships for Regions Bank, has been named one of the 25 Most Powerful Women to Watch in Banking and Finance by American Banker magazine. This is the second consecutive year that Danella has been recognized by the publication.

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Kate Danella, Regions Bank (Photo: Business Wire)

“No matter the challenge, Kate maintains an unwavering focus on putting people first through her dedication to our customers, associates and the communities we serve,” said John Turner, president and CEO of Regions Financial. “Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Kate and her team have continuously listened to our customers and reshaped our strategies and consumer products to address the urgent financial needs of individuals and families. I’m pleased that Kate has once again been recognized by the American Banker for her contributions to Regions and to the banking industry.”

The annual American Banker ranking recognizes the most influential female leaders in the banking industry, honoring their business acumen, professional achievements and personal tenacity. Honorees are featured in the October 2020 issue of American Banker magazine.

“For 18 years, this list has honored those who have achieved amazing things in the face of countless challenges — individuals who are bravely creating the change we need and driving the industry forward,” said Gemma Postlethwaite, CEO of Arizent, publisher of American Banker. “This year, our honorees have collectively succeeded in moving us forward despite unprecedented obstacles.”

The publication notes Danella’s leadership in expanding Regions’ focus on the unbanked and underbanked and her team’s efforts to introduce additional features and functionality throughout the bank’s deposit products and services to meet customer needs. Further, Kate and her team played a key role in the early days of the

For years, American corporations tried to increase job flexibility with scant success. The pandemic ushered in more flexibility, along with added responsibilities and few boundaries. For women, who typically shoulder more duties at home regardless of their breadwinning status, that has felt less like freedom than pressure to be always on.

We’re seeing the consequences in our sixth annual Women in the Workplace study, a joint effort by McKinsey & Co. and LeanIn.Org that is the largest annual benchmark of women’s progress in American corporations. More than one in four women say they may now quit or scale back their jobs. Among women at the managerial level and above, 30% want to step down or out. As a group, women could lose more than five years of gains across the career pipeline.

This is not simply a pause on the road to a more equitable workplace. This year’s report finds women feeling pushed to a point that is unsustainable, for reasons that go beyond home schooling and child care. LGBTQ+ women report mental-health challenges at almost twice the rate of other women. Latinas are most likely to worry about layoffs, while Black women are three times as likely as others to be dealing with the death of a family member from Covid-19. Among working mothers, 40% now spend at least three extra hours a day on child care and housework. Together, these issues could prompt up to two million women to quit over the next year—more than the number who will earn college and graduate degrees during the same period.

It doesn’t have to be this way. While the sudden shift to working from home is challenging, it also illustrates the opportunity. Even during these chaotic times—with constant doorbells, kids jumping on Zoom calls, sick family members and all the

Global Head, Public Sector Coverage

As the global head of public sector coverage, Julie Monaco oversees a team at Citigroup’s investment bank that provides a robust portfolio of financial services for state-run enterprises in 160 countries. It’s a role in which she works with heads of state, such as the president of Kazakhstan, in an effort to bring foreign investment to their countries, and represents Citi on global councils, such as the World Economic Forum’s Partnership Against Corruption Initiative.

An active member of the Citi Women’s Network and Citi’s Corporate and Investment Bank’s Diversity Committee, Monaco also continues to expand her leadership in matters of workplace equity and inclusion. Late last year at a panel discussion, “The Power of Public-Private Partnerships to Drive Gender Equality” at George Washington University, she called for finding strategies to work together to tackle the problem of gender inequality. “The future of our global economy depends on more people participating in it,” she said.

Closing the gender labor gap could add $28 trillion to the global gross domestic product by 2025, she argued. “It is more than a social or ethical issue. It is an economic issue.”

Monaco also spoke about Citi’s focus on low-income communities and underserved markets. She said the company last year provided $6 billion in loans for affordable housing projects in close to 200 cities. That made it the leading affordable housing lender in the country for the 10th straight year.

Most recently Monaco has been providing thought leadership on the difficulties emerging markets face amid the pandemic. She said she hopes policymakers start to better manage the economic challenges they face. “This is not a financial crisis,” she said, “it is a health crisis that went to the real economy but will be a financial crisis if we do not

Ruth Malhotra had just arrived in Florida for a vacation with some girlfriends from high school and their families when President Donald Trump was scheduled to introduce his next nominee for the Supreme Court on Saturday afternoon. A college football game was on the television at their rented beach house. “Turn off football and turn on CSPAN!” she told her friends. “We’ve got to watch this; this is historic.”

Malhotra, 36, a lifelong evangelical Christian who works in communications for a Christian ministry, has little personal affection for Trump. So she was surprised to find herself tearing up as he introduced Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden, describing her as “a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials, and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution.”

Malhotra’s mother was watching at home back in Georgia, and felt a spark of recognition in Trump’s description of a selfless, family-oriented woman who reveres the Constitution. Her mother texted: “Trump’s description of Amy reminds me of you.”

Barrett’s nomination pleased many conservatives, who see in her legal credentials and judicial philosophy the potential for her to be the next Antonin Scalia, a solidly conservative presence on the court for decades.

But for many conservative Christian women, the thrill of the nomination is more personal. Barrett, for them, is a new kind of icon — one they have not seen before in American cultural and political life: a woman who is both unabashedly ambitious and deeply religious, who has excelled at the heights of a demanding profession even as she speaks openly about prioritizing her conservative Catholic faith and family. Barrett has seven children, including two children adopted from Haiti and a young son with Down syndrome.

U.S. Supreme Court vacancy

“I found some personal inspiration in Ginsburg — you couldn’t not,” said

Ruth Malhotra had just arrived in Florida for a vacation with some girlfriends from high school and their families when President Trump was scheduled to introduce his next nominee for the Supreme Court on Saturday afternoon. A college football game was on the television at their rented beach house. “Turn off football and turn on CSPAN!” she told her friends. “We’ve got to watch this; this is historic.”

Ms. Malhotra, 36, a lifelong evangelical Christian who works in communications for a Christian ministry, has little personal affection for President Trump. So she was surprised to find herself tearing up as he introduced Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden, describing her as “a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials, and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution.”

Ms. Malhotra’s mother was watching at home back in Georgia, and felt a spark of recognition in Mr. Trump’s description of a selfless, family-oriented woman who reveres the Constitution. Her mother texted: “Trump’s description of Amy reminds me of you.”

Judge Barrett’s nomination pleased many conservatives, who see in her legal credentials and judicial philosophy the potential for her to be the next Antonin Scalia, a solidly conservative presence on the court for decades.

But for many conservative Christian women, the thrill of the nomination is more personal. Judge Barrett, for them, is a new kind of icon — one they have not seen before in American cultural and political life: a woman who is both unabashedly ambitious and deeply religious, who has excelled at the heights of a demanding profession even as she speaks openly about prioritizing her conservative Catholic faith and family. Judge Barrett has seven children, including two children adopted from Haiti and a young son with Down syndrome.

“I found some personal inspiration in Ginsburg — you couldn’t