CHICAGO, Oct 12 (Reuters)A Wisconsin factory hailed by President Donald Trump as proof he was reviving U.S. manufacturing did not create enough jobs in 2019 to earn its owner Foxconn Technology Group tax credits, the state said on Monday, the second year it has missed its targets.

In a letter to the Taiwan-based company’s Vice Chairman Jay Lee, Wisconsin’s economic development agency said Foxconn was a long way away from building the large TV screens it had proposed in 2017, when it promised to eventually create 13,000 jobs in the state.

The Apple Inc AAPL.O supplier’s plans for the Mount Pleasant factory are now unclear, the letter from The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) said.

The planned $10 billion, 20-million-square-foot campus was hailed by the White House as the largest investment for a brand new location by a foreign-based company in U.S. history.

But for many the factory has become a symbol of failed promises in Midwestern states like Wisconsin that were key to Trump’s 2016 election and are now closely watched swing states in the Republican’s bid to be re-elected on Nov. 3.

Wisconsin’s Democratic Governor Tony Evers, who inherited a deal from his Republican predecessor to give Foxconn $4 billion in tax breaks and other incentives when he took office in 2019, has sought to renegotiate the state’s contract with the firm.

Foxconn said in a statement it employed more than the minimum 520 full-time workers by the end of the year to get the credit.

“WEDC’s determination of ineligibility during ongoing discussion is a disappointment and a surprise that threatens good faith negotiations,” it said.

WEDC’s review found Foxconn had fewer full-time employees than the minimum, however. It also fell short of its employment goal in 2018.

“Once Foxconn is able to provide more accurate

Taiwan-based Apple supplier Foxconn is failing to deliver on promises associated with its multibillion-dollar manufacturing facility in Wisconsin – so much so that the state is withholding coveted tax incentives.

The world’s largest electronic provider was promised a $3 billion incentives package, but failed to meet key milestones necessary to receive subsidies, documents first reported by The Verge showed.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation on Monday denied Foxconn’s application for tax subsidies on the basis that it did not hire the promised number of eligible employees and that it was not following through on plans to build a liquid crystal display fabrication facility.

“It is evident from the Recipients’ 2019 Annual Project Report that the recipients are not building a 10.5 Fab, and that current activities are smaller in scale and economic impact to the region and the State of Wisconsin than those projected by the analyses run on the 10.5 Fab when WEDC initially approved and executed the agreement,” the WEDC wrote.

APPLE PARTNER FOXCONN MULLS NEW FACTORIES FOR MEXICO, NOT CHINA 

As noted by The Verge, Wisconsin lawmakers have tried to renegotiate the company’s contract for the facility – but have so far been unable to do so.

Wisconsin lawmakers originally put together a $3 billion incentives package to lure the company to the state.

A spokesperson for Foxconn did not return FOX Business’ request for comment.

FOXCONN’S REVENUE HAMMERED BY CORONAVIRUS

The deal to build the facility was struck in 2017 by former Republican Gov. Scott Walker, and has been touted by President Trump as a victory for the U.S. manufacturing sector. As part of the deal, state lawmakers negotiated a package including about $3 billion

The Wisconsin Office of the Commissioner of Insurance Mark Afable has charged former insurance agent, Timothy S. Bratley, with a number of violations of insurance law all targeting elderly consumers.

Bratley, also a licensed funeral director in northern Wisconsin, was accused of naming himself and his wife as the beneficiary of insurance policies that he sold to his elderly customers.

In one reported instance, Bratley befriended an elderly widower. The man had no living children and was estranged from his family. Bratley and his brother sold the man a life insurance policy to fund future funeral and burial expenses.

Six months later, Bratley allegedly had the man transfer ownership of his home and land to him via quit claim deed. That same day, the man signed a will naming Bratley the beneficiary of his estate and a power of attorney naming Bratley’s wife as the man’s general power of attorney. Five years later, Bratley reportedly sold the man an annuity and Bratley’s wife was named the primary beneficiary of that annuity.

In the final decision issued on Sept. 18, Afable found that Bratley engaged in unfair trade practices and made a misrepresentation in an application for insurance. The final decision ordered Bratley to forfeit to the state twice his commission for one self-dealing transaction and pay $1,000 per violation of insurance law. The total financial penalty to Bratley is $37,375 to the state. Afable also ordered that Bratley’s insurance license be permanently revoked.

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