Democratic incumbent Susan Wild and Republican challenger Lisa Scheller sparred over health insurance policy, tax plans and accusations of extremism on Monday during the first 7th Congressional District debate of the general election.



a group of people sitting in a chair in front of a building: The Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce holds an event with the recording of the WFMZ tv show Business Matters with Tony Iannelli, who is holding the first debate between 7th Congressional District candidates Susan Wild, and Lisa Scheller, center, at Saucon Valley Country Club. During a recording break.


© April Gamiz/The Morning Call/The Morning Call/TNS
The Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce holds an event with the recording of the WFMZ tv show Business Matters with Tony Iannelli, who is holding the first debate between 7th Congressional District candidates Susan Wild, and Lisa Scheller, center, at Saucon Valley Country Club. During a recording break.

Scheller was on the offensive from the get-go, criticizing Wild for usually voting with Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, whom Scheller believes is trying to “take us down a road to socialism.” In contrast, Scheller portrayed herself as a business leader who cut taxes and worked across the aisle during her four years serving as a Lehigh County commissioner.

Wild, who in 2018 became the first woman to represent the Lehigh Valley in Congress, pointed out that she was among 14 House Democrats to reject the party’s follow-up coronavirus package, saying it wasn’t specific enough and didn’t do enough to help PA-7 voters. She also noted that 78 Republicans voted for her proposal blocking regulatory changes that would cause health insurance premiums to rise, and that she is working with Republicans on improvements to the paycheck protection program.

“I am by no means a socialist,” Wild said during a one-hour taping of WFMZ-TV 69 1/4 u2032s ‘Business Matters.’ “… I know who I am, and more importantly I believe my constituents know who I am.”

The debate was moderated by Tony Iannelli, president and CEO of the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce. It will be broadcast in two parts at 7:30 p.m. Monday night and Oct. 12. It was

Rollercoaster moves in the natural gas market over the past few weeks are underscoring traders’ uncertainty about whether a frigid winter, muted output, and rebounding demand will send prices rocketing higher in the coming months.

Gas futures settled more than 7 percent higher on Monday, mimicking gains in oil and equities. But just two weeks ago, prices posted their biggest one-day loss in almost two years. Historical volatility has surged to levels not seen since late 2018, and implied volatility, a measure of how dramatic price swings may be going forward, is the highest in data going back to 2010.

Bullish bets on US gas have soared as traders wager on lackluster production and surging demand heading into winter. Liquefied natural gas exports are rising as consumption recovers from pandemic-driven lockdowns, and as terminals restart after storm-related outages and maintenance. Meanwhile, shale output remains subdued as drillers heed investor calls for financial restraint after this year’s oil-price crash.

Outsize moves in risk assets amid geopolitical turmoil have magnified the volatility in gas, while a hyperactive hurricane season has disrupted offshore production and LNG exports and triggered blackouts that curtailed gas demand for power generation.

“You’ve had a volatile market, but this is the icing on the cake,” said Bob Yawger, director of the futures division at Mizuho Securities USA Inc. “Guys were stepping in to pick at the bottom.”

But as is often the case with the gas market, it all hinges on the weather. Though a La Nina pattern has emerged, which could lead to a chilly winter in the northern United States, brutally cold conditions are far from certain. A mild December, January, and February would limit gas demand for heating and curb withdrawals from underground storage, leaving the market oversupplied heading into spring.

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NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied on Wednesday, but only after zooming up, down and back up again in a fitting end to what was a wild month and quarter for Wall Street.

Prospects for additional support from Congress for the economy helped drive the day’s trading, as they have for weeks. The S&P 500 shot to a gain of as much as 1.7% after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC that he would talk with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi about a potential deal in the afternoon, “and I hope we can get something done.”

But the gains nearly vanished as pessimism rose about Washington’s ability to get past its partisanship and send economic aid that investors say is crucial. The S&P 500 hit its low for the day just after Pelosi said she and Mnuchin “found areas where we are seeking further clarification,” though she said talks will continue.

By the end of trading, momentum had returned, and the S&P 500 rose 27.53 points, or 0.8%, to 3,363.00. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 329.04, or 1.2%, to 27,781.70, and the Nasdaq composite added 82.26, or 0.7%, to 11,167.51.


It was the last day of a strong quarter for the market, where the S&P 500 rallied 8.5% to follow up on its 20% surge in the spring. Continued support from the Federal Reserve helped drive the gains, as the central bank leaned further into the whatever-it-takes approach taken to support markets and the economy. After already cutting interest rates to nearly zero, the Fed said during the quarter that it may keep interest rates low even after inflation runs above its target level.

But momentum slowed sharply at the end of the quarter, and the S&P 500 lost 3.9% in September for its first monthly loss since the