When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save a homeowner a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time homebuyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time homebuyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

A homeowners insurance premium can depend in part on distance to the nearest fire hydrant and fire station, Naughton says. Homes that are on narrow roads or otherwise difficult for fire trucks to access also could be more expensive to insure.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey that they were considering moving out of the city because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“If they have to cross over a bridge, it’s not only a consideration of can a car go over that bridge, but also can a fire engine,” she says.

Some homes are at such high risk of wildfires and severe weather — hurricanes, tornadoes, windstorms and hail —that private companies won’t insure them. Without insurance, buyers can’t get a mortgage, so they need to turn to state-run risk pools such as Beach and Windstorm Plans or Fair Access to Insurance Requirements Plans, better known as FAIR. These policies typically cost more and cover less than regular

Lamb Weston Holdings, Inc. LW reported first-quarter fiscal 2021 results, wherein both top and bottom lines declined year over year and the former fell short of the Zacks Consensus Estimate. Results were affected by lower demand due to the adverse impact of the pandemic on traffic at restaurants and other foodservice channels. Also, higher pandemic-related costs have been a deterrent.

Nonetheless, sales and earnings improved sequentially and the company is positive about the improvement in traffic at restaurants in the United States and core international markets. In the United States, demand stabilized in the latter part of the first quarter and also in September, thanks to a rebound in quick-service restaurants, increased deliveries and improved trends at full-service restaurants as curbs on pandemic-led restrictions are being lifted. However, demand remains below pre-pandemic levels. Retail demand for branded products remained steady, though lower than its peak in the initial weeks of the virus outbreak. Overall pricing has been stable.

Quarter in Detail

The company’s earnings of 61 cents per share declined 23% year over year due to soft sales and lower gross profit. The bottom line, however, easily surpassed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 30 cents per share.

Lamb Weston Holdings Inc. Price, Consensus and EPS Surprise

Lamb Weston Holdings Inc. Price, Consensus and EPS Surprise

Lamb Weston Holdings Inc. price-consensus-eps-surprise-chart | Lamb Weston Holdings Inc. Quote

Net sales came in at $871.5 million, which tumbled 12% year on year and missed the consensus mark of $878 million. Volumes fell 14% year over year due to a decline in demand for frozen potato products in the away-from-home channel due to restrictions on restaurants and other foodservice operations to curb the coronavirus spread. Nevertheless, higher at-home consumption of frozen potato products amid the pandemic offered some respite. Notably, the price/mix rose 2% on the back of improvement in the Retail and

When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save you a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time homebuyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time homebuyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

WHERE’S THE NEAREST FIRE HYDRANT?

A homeowners insurance premium can depend in part on distance to the nearest fire hydrant and fire station, Naughton says. Homes that are on narrow roads or otherwise difficult for fire trucks to access also could be more expensive to insure.

“If they have to cross over a bridge, it’s not only a consideration of can a car go over that bridge, but also can a fire engine,” she says.

Some homes are at such high risk of wildfires and severe weather — hurricanes, tornadoes, windstorms and hail — that private companies won’t insure them. Without insurance, you can’t get a mortgage, so you’d need to turn to state-run risk pools such as Beach and Windstorm Plans or Fair Access to Insurance Requirements Plans, better known as FAIR. These policies typically cost more and cover less than regular homeowners insurance.

Also, many homeowners policies in storm-prone areas have hurricane deductibles that are higher than the normal deductible,