Oct 12 (Reuters) – Gold prices edged lower on Monday, after
hitting a three-week high earlier in the session, as the dollar
firmed and talks over a new U.S. stimulus package ran into
resistance.

FUNDAMENTALS

* Spot gold fell 0.2% to $1,925.29 per ounce by 0046
GMT, after hitting its highest level since Sept. 21 at $1,932.96
earlier in the session.

* U.S. gold futures were up 0.3% at $1,932.70.

* The dollar index was up 0.1% against rivals, making
gold more expensive for holders of other currencies. [USD/]

* The Trump administration on Sunday called on Congress to
pass a stripped-down coronavirus relief bill using leftover
funds from an expired small business loan program as
negotiations on a broader package ran into resistance.

* U.S. President Donald Trump said on Sunday he had fully
recovered from COVID-19 and was not an infection risk for
others.

* Britain will explore every avenue for a trade deal with
the European Union but progress to bridge significant gaps needs
to be made in the coming days, British Prime Minister Boris
Johnson told French President Emmanuel Macron on Saturday.

* Speculators increased their bullish positions in COMEX
gold and cut them in silver contracts in the week to Oct. 6, the
U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) said on Friday.

* Physical gold was sold at a premium in India last week for
the first time since mid-August as jewellers stocked up, hoping
key festivals would bring customers back to stores.

* Silver eased 0.4% to $25.02 per ounce, platinum
fell 1% to $876.80, and palladium was down 0.2% to
$2,435.35.

(Reporting by Eileen Soreng in Bengaluru; Editing by Rashmi
Aich)
(([email protected]; Within U.S. +1 646 223
8780, Outside U.S. +91 80 6749 6131; Reuters Messaging:
[email protected]))

Keywords: GLOBAL PRECIOUS/

The views and

BANGKOK, Oct 8 (Reuters)Thai consumer confidence dropped in September for the first time in five months on concerns about growing political protests, a slow economic recovery and job losses from the coronavirus pandemic, a university survey showed on Thursday.

The consumer index of the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce fell to 50.2 in September from 51.0 in August.

“Various political gatherings made people have no confidence in government stability,” while the surprise exit of the country’s finance minister last month was negative, university president Thanavath Phonvichai told a briefing.

Demonstrators have rallied against the military-backed government in larger numbers in recent months, with some also calling for reforms of the powerful monarchy. The next big protest is set for Oct. 14.

Consumers felt the economic situation remained bad as tourism has yet to recover, Thanavath said.

“If the situation does not improve, there may be more than 500,000 job cuts in the sector in the fourth quarter,” he said.

Thailand has recorded no foreign tourists since April and relatively few infections due to a travel ban designed to keep the coronavirus at bay.

It aims to receive its first visitors later this month as part of an incremental reopening, but only a small fraction of the usual influx.

Recent government stimulus measures are positive, but most consumers felt the economy would recover in the second half of next year, Thanavath said.

The university predicts Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy to contract 7%-9% this year before growing 3%-4% next year, he said.

(Reporting by Kitiphong Thaichareon Writing by Orathai Sriring; Editing by Martin Petty)

(([email protected]; +662 0802309; Reuters Messaging: [email protected]))

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

Source Article

I wanted to investigate if COVID 19 has made it harder for VC’s & startups to discover each other, for startups to pitch and get funded, and for B2C and B2B customers to learn about new offerings.  One might think investors would have been paralyzed by:

·       The uncertainty of how long COVID and its economic impact would last

·       The near impossibility of in-person networking for founders & VC’s

·       Lower spending by consumers either unemployed or fearful of layoffs, and businesses whose spending has been curtailed

·       Reduced ability for consumers to discover, touch, feel & experience new products & services physically in retail outlets 

9 global experts, with different perspectives, shared their views.  To my surprise, all 9 were optimistic that on the whole, things have been much better for startups and VC’s than might have been expected.

Post COVID Acceleration of Disruptive Startup Opportunities

New York based startup investor, Jack Einhorn, shared that when markets are being disrupted, like the current forced acceleration of all things digital, many opportunities are created, and now is one of the most prolific times in history for spawning new ways of doing things.  

Ron Gonen, Founder & CEO at Closed Loop Partners, a fund focused on sustainability, shared that investors get excited when the world is changing, creating opportunities, new business models and ways of doing things.  COVID has shined a light on the importance of new ways of managing supply chains to respond quickly, transparently, and cost effectively, and with less waste, rather than producing goods far away that are more difficult to access.  The increase in wildfires and hurricanes, has accelerated even more, the urgency to find new ways

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Investors on Wall Street can add another layer of uncertainty to a market already unnerved by last month’s sell-off, stalled fiscal stimulus and President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, which weighed on stocks on Friday.

FILE PHOTO: The Wall Street sign is pictured at the New York Stock exchange (NYSE) in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., March 9, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

A higher capital gains tax that could accompany a win by Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is also emerging as a potential counterweight to this year’s powerful rally in stocks.

Biden has proposed here taxing capital gains and dividends as ordinary income, which would increase the tax rate from 20% to 39.6% for individuals and couples earning over $1 million, the highest tax bracket.

That policy – which would likely be easier to enact if Democrats also win the Senate and retain control of the House – may push some investors to lock in gains ahead of December if Biden emerges the winner in the Nov. 3 vote, fund managers said.

Tax-motivated selling would likely be most pronounced in technology and other momentum stocks and could push the broad S&P 500 index lower between November and the end of the year, said Eddie Perkin, chief equity investment officer at Eaton Vance.

“If you have enough people looking to harvest gains, that has an impact on the stocks that have led the market, and the big tech stocks could be where people choose to sell at the end of the year,” he said.

On Friday, President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis triggered a sell-off in stocks and oil as investors moved away from risk assets. But many tech and momentum stocks are sporting healthy gains for the year despite a sell-off that pushed

By David Randall

NEW YORK, Oct 2 (Reuters)Investors on Wall Street can add another layer of uncertainty to a market already unnerved by last month’s sell-off, stalled fiscal stimulus, and by President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, which weighed on stocks on Friday.

A higher capital gains tax that could accompany a win by Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is also emerging as a potential counterweight to this year’s powerful rally in stocks.

Biden has proposed taxing capital gains and dividends as ordinary income, which would increase the tax rate from 20% to 39.6% for individuals and couples earning over $1 million, the highest tax bracket.

That policy – which would likely be easier to enact if Democrats also win the Senate and retain control of the House – may push some investors to lock in gains ahead of December if Biden emerges the winner in the Nov. 3 vote, fund managers said.

Tax-motivated selling would likely be most pronounced in technology and other momentum stocks and could push the broad S&P 500 index lower between November and the end of the year, said Eddie Perkin, chief equity investment officer at Eaton Vance.

“If you have enough people looking to harvest gains, that has an impact on the stocks that have led the market, and the big tech stocks could be where people choose to sell at the end of the year,” he said.

On Friday, President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis triggered a sell-off in stocks and oil as investors moved away from risk assets. But many tech and momentum stocks are sporting healthy gains for the year despite a sell-off that pushed the S&P 500 down 3.9% in September, its first monthly loss since March.

Tesla Inc TSLA.O, for instance, is up 423% for the year through