The rules right now in Michigan are a bit of a mess.

But no matter how you draw it up, the last batch of businesses proactively closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic can reopen Friday, Oct. 9.

The list of places that can reopen includes theaters, performance venues, amusement parks, arcades, bingo halls, bowling centers, indoor climbing facilities, indoor dance areas, roller rinks, ice rinks, trampoline parks, carnival or amusement rides, water parks and other similar recreational and entertainment facilities.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s Executive Order 2020-183 – issued Sept. 25 – allowed these businesses to reopen Friday. There’s an argument they could have opened as soon as last Friday, however, as Michigan’s executive orders were struck down by a state Supreme Court ruling that day.

Whitmer’s team argued the orders still have merit for three to four weeks, but other experts disagree. While that question remains in limbo, these entertainment venues are now off the hook from either angle.

Friday marks the first day every Michigan industry can open its businesses under Whitmer’s executive orders – albeit with restrictions.

One exception is bars with 70% of their sales coming from alcohol must still be closed inside, per the orders, although they can operate in outdoor spaces.

Moore Theaters has five theaters in southwest Michigan and are among the venues ready to open Friday for the first time since the pandemic began.

“It’s not a free-for-all,” said Scott Moore, vice president of Moore Theaters. “We’re not going back to 100% (capacity). We’re still going to have to still do these things to make sure we get over this pandemic.”

There was no consideration to opening early, since it takes a few weeks to sort out logistics of getting films in, Moore said. The biggest picture debuting this weekend is “The War

(This story has been updated with additional information.)

FLINT, MI — A federal lawsuit filed on behalf of Flint children claims three companies that helped finance Flint’s participation in the Karegnondi Water Authority are partly responsible for the city’s water crisis.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday, Oct. 7, in U.S. District Court, says J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Wells Fargo Bank National Association, and Stifel, Nicolaus, and Company, Inc., pushed ahead with bonding to finance construction of a new water pipeline to Lake Huron while knowing the city would use the Flint River as its short-term source of drinking water and of the resulting hazards to residents’ health.

Without the bond financing, Flint would not have been able to join the KWA and tap into its new pipeline, the lawsuit alleges, the KWA would not have been able to start construction of the project, and the city would never have switched its water source to the river.

Flint was initial partner in the KWA, agreeing to buy a set amount of raw water from the new pipeline, but unlike Genesee County, the other primary partner, the city stopped purchasing pre-treated water from the city of Detroit before the pipeline was built, switching instead to treating its own river water during parts of 2014 and 2015.

The city’s change in water source triggered the water crisis, sending highly corrosive water through the distribution system, including thousands of lead and galvanized service lines to homes, causing elevated levels of lead and bacteria in tap water.

State appointed emergency managers were charged with running the city’s affairs at the time bonding was secured for the pipeline project.

“J.P. Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Stifel knew … that the Flint River would be used as an interim source of drinking water for Flint for the

TOKYO (Reuters) – The dollar held tight ranges against its peers on Monday as investors awaited clarity on the health of U.S. President Donald Trump after he tested positive for the coronavirus, sending markets into safe-haven assets.

“With not a lot of major economic indicators released this week, the focus all comes down to Trump’s illness,” said Daisuke Uno, chief strategist at Sumitomo Mitsui Bank.

“There is a welter of information about the severity of his condition, and that is making it difficult for market participants to make a move,” Uno said.

Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, Trump was flown to hospital for treatment for the coronavirus on Friday, adding another layer of uncertainty and market volatility as Trump’s re-election campaign seeks to fend off Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

Doctors treating Trump for COVID-19 told reporters on Sunday they are monitoring the condition of his lungs after he received supplemental oxygen, hours before Trump surprised supporters outside the hospital by riding past in a motorcade.

The news came the day after contradictory messages from the White House caused widespread confusion about the president’s condition.

“Earlier, some traders bought back dollars and U.S. stock futures immediately after the news came out about Trump briefly leaving the hospital,” Sumitomo Mitsui Bank’s Uno said. “But I don’t think it means that he has been completely cured.”

The dollar index <=USD> was little changed at 93.789, while traders adjusted their positions in safe-harbour currencies.

Against the safe-haven Japanese yen, the dollar rose 0.2% to 105.515 yen

, after making its sharpest fall in more than a month to reach a one-week low of 104.95 on Friday.
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But the greenback edged lower against the Swiss franc to 0.918

, near a one-week low of 0.9163 it marked on Wednesday.
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Meanwhile, sterling

This Tuesday marked 67 days of darkness for Kenneth Parson. He fell behind on his utility bills in the spring — and his lights went off, and stayed off, starting at the end of July.

No power meant no refrigerator, so Parson, a 62-year-old with diabetes in Griffin, Ga., had no choice but to store his temperature-sensitive insulin on ice in a small cooler. He didn’t have an easy way to cook at home, either, so his wife, Cheryl, took to preparing some meals for him in a neighbor’s kitchen.

In those first few days after they lost electricity, Cheryl had pleaded on Parson’s behalf with city officials who manage their local utilities, hoping she might change their minds in the middle of a pandemic that has left families nationwide struggling to cover their once-manageable costs of living.

“They said they couldn’t do nothing for him,” lamented Cheryl, 65, who lives apart from her husband but remains married and helps him manage his health conditions. “It peeved me off.”

The worst economic crisis in more than a generation has thrust potentially millions of Americans across the country into a similar, sudden peril: Cash-strapped, and in some cases still unemployed, they have fallen far behind on their electricity, water and gas bills, staring down the prospect of potential utility shut-offs and fast-growing debts they may never be able to repay.

At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many states acted quickly to ensure their residents would not lose their power or other utilities if their jobs or wages were slashed. Now, however, only 21 states and the District of Columbia still have such disconnection bans in place.

That leaves roughly 179 million Americans at risk of losing service even as the economy continues sputtering, according to the National Energy Assistance Directors’

CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico —  President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on Friday said Mexico has no choice but to pay its water debt to the U.S., or else face retaliation that could include new tariffs from the Trump administration, even as clashes continue over plans to release more of the precious liquid.

The populist López Obrador is in the tricky position of having to meet Mexico’s obligations under the shadow of the Trump administration while farmers, many of whom voted for  López Obrador, worry that they won’t have enough water for their crops if that happens.

“Unilateral measures could be taken that affect Mexico with the excuse that we are not meeting the treaty’s agreement,” López Obrador said Friday. “Like the creation of tariffs, taxes, on the products we sell and export to the U.S.”

The drought-stricken northern state of Chihuahua, across from Texas, has seen violent protests over the government’s decision to pay back water owed to the U.S. One protest led to a shootout on Sept. 8, leaving one dead and one wounded.

As a result of the treaty between the two nations over waters from the shared Rio Grande basin, Mexico is expected to deliver about 1.75 million acre-feet of water every five years to the U.S. Texas officials say Mexico owes about a year’s worth of water that needs to be delivered by Oct. 24.

“If we do not deliver what we are supposed to, we can give them footing to breach the treaty and revise it, which could harm us,” López Obrador said Friday while here in Ciudad Juarez  to inaugurate new infrastructure projects.

In a Sept. 16 letter, Gov. Greg Abbott urged U.S. Sec. of State Michael Pompeo to push for the enforcement of Mexico’s treaty obligations.

“The Mexican-controlled waters of the international Rio Grande