Dow futures turned higher Tuesday after Trump returned to the White House Monday evening despite only arriving at Walter Reed medical center on Friday. Most medical experts don’t see how Trump can safely go back to the White House as Covid-19 stays in our system for 14 days.

In the last episode of Mad Money, Jim Cramer said that the stock market has something for everyone as President Donald Trump was reportedly doing better, while Democratic challenger Joe Biden continues to widen his lead in the polls. That sent many different sectors rallying, even if they typically wouldn’t trade in tandem.

TheStreet’s Katherine Ross and Cramer are on Street Lightning talking about Regeneron stock after the Pharmaceuticals company new deal, the Bristol Meyers deal, and renewed hopes over the stimulus package. 

Regeneron Stock: Buy or Sell?

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.  (REGN) – Get Report shares jumped higher Monday amid speculation the drugmaker could soon receive Emergency Use Authority from the Food & Drug Administration after its coronavirus treatment was given to President Donald Trump. 

Trump’s doctors said over the weekend that he received an infusion of Regeneron’s dual antibody treatment for COVID-19 after testing positive for the virus on Thursday.

He likes Regeneron stock but tells investors not to buy it now. Cramers says that buying it now would be late and “idiotic.”

Cramer believes that therapeutics are “the way out of this virus” not vaccine, adding that people don’t believe in vaccines anymore because they believe that Trump corrupted the deal with the FDA.

Bristol Meyers Stock: Buy or Sell?

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co  (BMY) – Get Report. agreed on Monday to buy drugmaker MyoKardia Inc.  (MYOK) – Get Report, which makes the experimental heart treatment Mavacamten, for around $13.1 billion.

Bristol-Myers will

The hardest part about buying a new car during the pandemic may be finding a new car.



a person standing in front of a car: Mechanic Mark Petrauskas performs a repair on a customer's vehicle in the service department at the Packey Webb Ford dealership in Downers Grove on Oct. 1, 2020.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Mechanic Mark Petrauskas performs a repair on a customer’s vehicle in the service department at the Packey Webb Ford dealership in Downers Grove on Oct. 1, 2020.

While the automotive industry is showing signs of recovery, months of production stoppage, supply chain interruption and stay-at-home disruption has left many Chicago-area dealers with few new cars and lots of empty spaces.

Adding to the inventory shortage, the new model year — an automotive rite of fall — has yet to hit showrooms in any significant numbers. Many 2021 models may not actually arrive until 2021.

“It’s kind of hard to sell from an empty cupboard when you don’t have any new vehicles,” said John Webb, a principal with family-owned Packey Webb Ford, a 58-year-old Downers Grove dealership.

The auto industry is gaining some momentum after grinding to a halt at the onset of the pandemic. Chicago-area auto plants, which were shut down for much of the spring, are back up to pre-COVID-19 employment and production levels. Dealerships are open for business and consumer demand has been strong.



a man driving a car: Sales consultant Eric Mateo waits for customers at the Packey Webb Ford dealership in Downers Grove on Oct. 1, 2020.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Sales consultant Eric Mateo waits for customers at the Packey Webb Ford dealership in Downers Grove on Oct. 1, 2020.

But COVID-19 has been a change accelerator for the industry. With new cars in short supply, used car sales hit record numbers this summer. Online sales took off, dealers picked up and dropped off cars for service, and showroom visits touted Plexiglas and masks over free coffee and doughnuts.



a group of people sitting around a car: A customer fills out paperwork for her vehicle at the Packey Webb Ford in Downers Grove on Oct. 1, 2020.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
A customer fills out paperwork for her vehicle at the Packey Webb Ford in Downers Grove

This is a breaking news update. An earlier version of the story appears below.

US stocks are swinging through another day of back-and-forth trading on Thursday as Wall Street waits to see if Washington can get past its partisanship to deliver more support for the economy.

The S&P 500 was up 0.4 percent in afternoon trading, after briefly turning negative, as investors handicap the chances of a deal to send more cash to Americans, restore jobless benefits for laid-off workers and deliver assistance to airlines and other industries hit particularly hard by the pandemic.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 17 points, less than 0.1 percent, at 27,802, as of 2:38 p.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was 1.3 percent higher.

The market was once again moving erratically. The Dow had been up 259 points earlier and down as many as 112. Such moves have become typical recently, with several big shifts in momentum pushing markets around within a day.

Data reports released in the morning painted a mixed picture on the economy, which also added to the market’s sloshing around. One indicated the pace of layoffs across the country may have slowed last week, with the number of workers filing for unemployment benefits falling to 837,000 from 873,000. It’s a larger decline than economists expected, though the number remains incredibly high compared with before the pandemic.

“We’re certainly expecting the employment situation to slowly improve,” said Scott Wren, senior global market strategist at Wells Fargo Investment Institute. “Things seem to be moving in the right direction.”

But other reports showed that personal incomes weakened by more than expected and that growth in the country’s manufacturing sector fell short of forecasts.

Other warning signs are also looming for the economy, which has seen some slowdowns recently after the

By Fergal Smith

TORONTO (Reuters) – The Canadian dollar edged lower against its U.S. counterpart on Tuesday as oil prices fell and investors waited for the currency to extend this month’s decline before stepping in to buy it, with the loonie sticking to its recent trading range.

The loonie <CAD=> was trading 0.1% lower at 1.3381 to the greenback, or 74.73 U.S. cents, having matched intraday Friday’s 7-week low at 1.3418. The currency has fallen 2.5% this month as rising coronavirus cases in some parts of the world spooked financial markets.

“Client feedback suggests that there should be some decent U.S. dollar selling activity if we go north of 1.35, which should cap it,” said Simon Côté, managing director, risk management solutions, National Bank Financial. “There will have to be some decent risk-off sentiment for the dollar to go higher than that.”

Canada runs a current account deficit and is a major producer of commodities, including oil, so the loonie tends to be sensitive to the global flow of trade and capital.

U.S. crude oil futures <CLc1> settled 3.2% lower at $39.29 a barrel on worries about the outlook for fuel demand as Europe and the United States grappled with a surge in new coronavirus infections.

Producer prices in Canada rose by 0.3% in August from July on higher prices for primary non-ferrous metal products, Statistics Canada said. Still, prices were down 2.3% compared to the same month last year.

Canada’s GDP data for July is due on Wednesday, which could help guide expectations about the strength of economic recovery.

Canadian government bond yields eased across a flatter curve, with the 10-year dipping 1.1 basis points to 0.538%.

(Reporting by Fergal Smith; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Alistair Bell)

Source Article



FILE - In this May 26, 2020 file photo, a historic marker for Wall Street is shown in New York's financial district. Stocks are off to a mixed start on Wall Street Tuesday, Sept. 29 as the market cooled off following a rally the day before and as investors waited for the presidential debate between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. Banks and industrial companies had some of the biggest losses shortly after the opening bell Tuesday, while several big technology and communications companies were higher. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this May 26, 2020 file photo, a historic marker for Wall Street is shown in New York’s financial district. Stocks are off to a mixed start on Wall Street Tuesday, Sept. 29 as the market cooled off following a rally the day before and as investors waited for the presidential debate between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. Banks and industrial companies had some of the biggest losses shortly after the opening bell Tuesday, while several big technology and communications companies were higher. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Stocks recovered some of their earlier losses in afternoon trading Tuesday, as investors waited for the debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

The S&P 500 index was down 0.2% after being down 0.7% earlier in the day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 0.2% as of 3 p.m. Eastern. The Nasdaq was effectively unchanged.

Banks, energy companies and stocks that depend on consumer spending had some of the biggest losses. The price of oil fell 3.2%, dragging much of the energy sector down with it.

Technology stocks, which have long been the biggest driver of this year’s stock market moves, were mostly higher. Advanced Micro Devices, Twitter and Facebook were all up roughly 1%, though they had been higher at the opening of trading. Technology shares were helping keeping the Nasdaq in better shape than other indexes.

The Trump-Biden debate comes as coronavirus deaths worldwide crossed 1 million. Cases in the U.S. are on the rise again as states attempt to reopen schools and factories. Tens of millions of Americans remain out of work.

Investors remain uncertain whether the recovery that happened over the summer was sustainable, and whether the newest surge of cases will be as