Henry Ford Health System announced Friday it will raise the minimum wage for most of its lowest-paid workers to $15 an hour. 



a car parked on the side of a road: Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital valet employee Kenneth Douglas, 31, of West Bloomfield, runs back to the main entrance after parking a car on Oct. 8, 2020. Douglas said a pay increase may relieve him of having to hold two jobs to make ends meet.


© Mandi Wright, Detroit Free Press
Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital valet employee Kenneth Douglas, 31, of West Bloomfield, runs back to the main entrance after parking a car on Oct. 8, 2020. Douglas said a pay increase may relieve him of having to hold two jobs to make ends meet.

The increase takes effect Sunday, and will boost the pay of more than 3,000 employees in at least 100 different types of benefits-eligible jobs, including food service workers, environmental services staff andnurse assistants, among others.

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Michigan’s minimum wage is $9.65 an hour.

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The pay increase is expected to cost the health system about $6 million annually, and is part of a multi-phase plan that is expected to include a general increase for other employees later this year.

“Our core mission is to improve people’s lives,” said Henry Ford President and CEO Wright Lassiter III. “We know that across so many sectors of our country, where you have team members who have who have hourly wage levels that may not provide them with a sense of economic security and prosperity as we all would want for our own family members, loved ones, etc., that organization needs to think about stepping up to make that kind of investment in their team members.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Henry Ford CEO Wright Lassiter III speaking at the new sports medicine center in the Henry Ford Detroit Pistons Performance Center Wednesday September 18, 2019 in Detroit Michigan.


© Kirthmon F. Dozier, Detroit Free Press
Henry Ford CEO Wright Lassiter III speaking at the new sports medicine center in the Henry Ford Detroit Pistons Performance Center Wednesday September 18, 2019 in Detroit Michigan.

“While we can’t assert that raising the wage to $15 as the minimum standard for

PARIS (Reuters) – Global airlines warned on Tuesday that the coronavirus-stricken industry was on course to burn through another $77 billion in cash in the second half of 2020, calling on governments to renew expiring wage support programmes.



a large air plane on a runway: FILE PHOTO: Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago


© Reuters/Ivan Alvarado
FILE PHOTO: Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago

“The issue now is that aid, particularly the wage subsidies, is starting to be withdrawn,” Brian Pearce, chief economist at the International Air Transport Association (IATA), told reporters.

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Airlines consumed $51 billion in cash in the second quarter as the pandemic brought global travel to a near-standstill, the industry body said.

The call for increased support came as U.S. airlines begin furloughs of more than 32,000 workers amid fading hopes for a new federal bailout package. Wage support programmes are also tapering off in Europe and elsewhere.

Whereas the withdrawal of subsidies makes sense for sectors in recovery, IATA warned of further airline bankruptcies in the northern hemisphere winter as the collapse in revenue continues to dwarf cost savings. The average carrier now has cash for 8.5 months of operations, Pearce said.

“We’re facing some tough winter months for airlines when cash flows are always seasonally weak,” he said. “We’re looking (at) airlines getting into trouble if not failing without either further government support or (being) able to access capital markets for more cash.”

Airlines are pushing for a global system of pre-flight COVID-19 tests to replace quarantines and travel restrictions they blame for worsening the travel collapse.

(Reporting by Laurence Frost; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

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