The World Bank has approved $12 billion in financing to help developing countries buy and distribute coronavirus vaccines, tests, and treatments, aiming to support the vaccination of up to 1 billion people.

The $12 billion “envelope” is part of a wider World Bank Group package of up to $160 billion to help developing countries fight the COVID-19 pandemic, the bank said in a statement late Tuesday.

The World Bank said its COVID-19 emergency response programs are already reaching 111 countries.

Citizens in developing countries also need access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, it said.


“We are extending and expanding our fast-track approach to address the COVID emergency so that developing countries have fair and equal access to vaccines,” said the bank’s president, David Malpass, said in the statement.

“Access to safe and effective vaccines and strengthened delivery systems is key to alter the course of the pandemic and help countries experiencing catastrophic economic and fiscal impacts move toward a resilient recovery,” he said.

The International Finance Corporation, the private sector lending arm of the World Bank is investing in vaccine manufacturers through a $4 billion Global Health Platform, the World Bank said.

Researchers are working on developing more than 170 potential COVID-19 vaccines.

Development and deployment of such preventive vaccines is crucial to helping stem outbreaks of the coronavirus that has killed more than 1 million people and sickened more than 38 million, while devastating economies and leaving many millions jobless.

The world’s richest countries have locked up most of the world’s potential vaccine supply through 2021, raising worries that poor and vulnerable communities will not be able to get the shots. Meanwhile, an ambitious international project to deliver coronavirus vaccines to the world’s poorest people, called Covax, is facing potential shortages of money, cargo planes, refrigeration and vaccines

The World Bank has approved $12 billion in financing to help developing countries buy and distribute coronavirus vaccines, tests, and treatments, aiming to support the vaccination of up to 1 billion people.

The $12 billion “envelop” is part of a wider World Bank Group package of up to $160 billion to help developing countries fight the COVID-19 pandemic, the bank said in a statement late Tuesday.

The World Bank said its COVID-19 emergency response programs are already reaching 111 countries.

Citizens in developing countries also need access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, it said.

“We are extending and expanding our fast-track approach to address the COVID emergency so that developing countries have fair and equal access to vaccines,” said the bank’s president, David Malpass, said in the statement.

“Access to safe and effective vaccines and strengthened delivery systems is key to alter the course of the pandemic and help countries experiencing catastrophic economic and fiscal impacts move toward a resilient recovery,” he said.

The International Finance Corporation, the private sector lending arm of the World Bank is investing in vaccine manufacturers through a $4 billion Global Health Platform, the statement said.

Development and deployment of vaccines is crucial to helping stem outbreaks of the coronavirus that has killed more than 1 million people and sickened more than 38 million, while devastating economies and leaving many millions jobless.

The World Bank said it will draw on expertise and experience from its involvement in many large-scale immunization programs and other public health efforts.

The funding is meant to also help countries access tests and treatments and to support management of supply chains and other logistics for vaccinations in developing countries, the bank said.

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(Bloomberg) — Demand for cars in China continues to go from strength to strength, making the automobile market in Asia’s biggest economy a lone bright spot as the coronavirus pandemic puts a damper on sales in Europe and the U.S.



a group of people standing on top of a car: A customer speaks with a sales agent while standing between a Ford Motor Co. Everest sport utility vehicle (SUV), right, and a Mustang sports car on display at a Ford dealership in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, July 19, 2018. The fledgling U.S.-China trade war will take a toll on companies from both sides, with some tariffs in place and the potential to escalate into consumer boycotts.


© Bloomberg
A customer speaks with a sales agent while standing between a Ford Motor Co. Everest sport utility vehicle (SUV), right, and a Mustang sports car on display at a Ford dealership in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, July 19, 2018. The fledgling U.S.-China trade war will take a toll on companies from both sides, with some tariffs in place and the potential to escalate into consumer boycotts.

Deliveries of sedans, SUVs, minivans and multipurpose vehicles increased 7.4% in September from a year earlier to 1.94 million units, the China Passenger Car Association said Tuesday. That’s the third straight monthly increase, and it was driven by demand for SUVs. A fuller sales picture will be reported later in the day by the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

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With auto sales in the U.S. and Europe still impacted by the Covid-19 outbreak, reviving demand in China is proving a boon for international and domestic manufacturers. China is set to be the first country globally to bounce back to 2019 volume levels, albeit only by 2022, according to researchers including S&P Global Ratings.

Automakers worldwide have invested billions of dollars in China, the world’s top car market since 2009, where the middle class is expanding but penetration is still relatively low. Brands from countries such as Germany and Japan have weathered the pandemic better than their local rivals — the combined market share of Chinese brands fell to 36.2% in the first eight months from a peak of 43.9% in 2017.

Even as the market recovers, it may still record

Stock markets rose Friday as news of progress on virus treatments boosted sentiment, following a bout of volatility over the prospects for a US stimulus package.

Observers said that with Democrats and Republicans about $600 billion apart in their stimulus proposals, there was little expectation a deal would be reached before the November 3 presidential election.

“Things are still up in the air when it comes to the relief package in the US,” noted David Madden, market analyst at CMC Markets UK.

He added however that “the prospect of some form of stimulus in the US is trumping the health crisis” for stock markets.

And there has been some good news regarding coronavirus treatments.

Markets cheered a write-up in the New England Journal of Medicine reporting that Gilead Sciences’ remdesivir drug resulted in “consistent, clinically meaningful improvements” in coronavirus patients, the latest positive indicator about a leading treatment.

That news follows announcements by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly earlier in the week on Covid-19 therapies that have boosted confidence in effectiveness of the treatments for the virus.

The market is “being stimulated more this week by the realization that there just might be a widespread, effective COVID treatment regimen that gets approved soon,” said Briefing.com analyst Patrick J. O’Hare.

“The gist is that, the more confidence there is in potential treatment plans, the more confidence there will be in a potential return to normal activity,” he added.

The Dow was 0.5 percent higher in late morning trading in New York, while the major European indices closed with small gains.

There is also growing expectation that Democrat Joe Biden will win the US election, with polls giving him big enough leads in battleground states that could prevent President Trump from challenging the result — a situation that would fan uncertainty.

With

BUDAPEST, Oct 9 (Reuters)Central European currencies firmed on Friday, with the Hungarian forint extending gains after a lower-than-expected September inflation reading took pressure off the central bank and the trade balance posted a sizeable surplus in August.

While the decline in inflation temporarily relieves the National Bank of Hungary, which is battling inflation and deepening recession worries, risks in Central European and emerging markets are high as COVID-19 cases spike.

“The slowing pace of recovery in CEE and the rising number of new COVID-19 cases will likely keep risks elevated,” Morgan Stanley analysts said in a note.

“While we think that the benign September inflation print will ease some of the pressure for the (Hungarian) central bank to deliver tighter monetary conditions, we think that it is too early for it to consider realigning the one-week depo rate to the base rate at 0.60%.”

The bank hiked the one-week depo rate by 15 basis points to 0.75% on Sept. 25, which helped shore up the weakening forint and reverse a negative trend.

On Friday, the forint EURHUF= was up 0.1% at 357.20 to the euro, after it outperformed peers on Thursday.

Hungary posted a foreign trade surplus of 251 million euros ($295.98 million) in August, above analyst forecasts for 140 million.

The Czech crown EURCZK= was also 0.1% firmer, even though the Czech Republic’s daily cases of the novel coronavirus rose to 5,394 on Thursday, the third record tally in a row.

“Thursday was a bad day for the CZK rates, (on) the long end dropping by 6 bps on disappointing retail sales, a record number of new COVID-19 cases and tighter government restrictions announced in the afternoon,” Komercni Banka trader Marek Lesko said in a morning note on Friday.

The Czech government will tighten anti-coronavirus measures from