Co-Founder & Co-CEO at Drip Capital, defining the strategic vision and overseeing product, business development and global operations.

International trade has increasingly become a key force behind global GDP growth. With steady increases in transaction size as well as payment periods, a lot of this trade has become reliant on trade finance facilitation by lenders. In fact, up to 80% of international trade requires some kind of financing.

Since the earliest days of commerce, trade has primarily been financed by institutions and individuals with deep pockets. These financial institutions have been focused heavily on financing large businesses and trading companies that have a reasonable assurance of success.

As a result, small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) have been left out of the trade finance circuit, despite contributing significantly to global trade. The Asian Development Bank estimated that nearly 45% of SMB trade finance applications are rejected by banks and traditional lenders.

However, a new class of financier has stepped up to the plate in recent years, in the form of alternative finance providers. Data-driven and agile, these fintech firms (to include our own) are pushing to close the gap, relying on technology to break the barriers faced by traditional lenders in servicing SMBs. The success of these newer players in originating high volumes and strong credit quality — key requirements for institutional investors —has resulted in the resurgence of a particular investment asset: trade finance receivables.

The Return Of The Trade Receivable

In a cross-border transaction, there are two parties: an exporter and an importer (i.e., a buyer). A third party (a financier) is introduced when one party needs advance payments. When an exporter generates an invoice against an order from a buyer, with the expectation the buyer will pay that invoice, that invoice is a trade receivable. The

Container ship outside Hong Kong

Blockchain and trade finance have always seemed like natural partners, and a company based in India is taking another stab at cracking the code.

Persistence has built the back-end infrastructure for a trade finance system that will allow small and medium-sized buyers to more easily find financing for commodities purchased from sellers, traveling between the main trade hubs of Asia, places like Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai, among others.

The startup closed a $3.7 million token round led by Arrington XRP, along with Alameda Research and South Korean stablecoin company Terra, among others. The backers are purchasing the Persistence token, or XPRT, which is set to be released sometime late this year or early next year, once macroeconomic conditions appear to be stabilized, said Persistence CEO Tushar Aggarwal.

Related: Boardroom Raises $2.2M for Blockchain Governance Toolset

“Commodity trading is a notoriously difficult industry to penetrate,” Aggarwal told CoinDesk in an interview, noting that other firms like Perlin and Centrifuge have already entered this space.

Persistence’s advantage, Aggarwal said, lies less in its technology than in its business-development strategy.

To build an application that would appeal to companies outside of the blockchain industry, Persistence settled on Tendermint as its base layer, after investigating both Ethereum and Waves.

“A big focus of ours is the institutional folks. On the institutional side we tried to abstract away some of the complexity,” Aggarwal said.

Related: Dapper Labs Raises $18M in Token Sale for NFT-Centric Flow Blockchain

Read more: Cosmos Gains Traction in India Amid Broader Crypto Resurgence

The specific trade finance platform was built as a separate application atop Persistence, called Comdex. That platform was turned over to a third party that already has access to the trade finance industry. Invoices get turned into non-fungible tokens (NFTs) that can then be collateralized to back

An international investment firm now owns an industrial park at DFW International Airport.

New York-based Brookfield Properties acquired the three-building Passport Logistics Center.

The 1.2 million-square-foot warehouse and distribution complex was developed by Dalfen Industrial, which has headquarters offices in Dallas and Canada. The buildings are at the south end of the airport near Airport Freeway and are part of the airport’s mixed-use Passport Park development.

Dalfen built the Passport Logistics Center in partnership with Brookfield, which now is the full owner of the business park.

“With the project’s prime location and best-in-class functionality, Brookfield Properties leased 50% of the project during construction,” Brookfield Properties officials said in a statement. “Over the past three years, Brookfield Properties has increased its footprint in the Metroplex, adding over 5.5 million square feet across nine transactions.”

During the last year, Brookfield has added more than $1.2 billion in logistics properties in the U.S.

North Texas warehouse construction is barely keeping up with demand.

Dalfen Industrial in turn has bought five industrial buildings in Fort Worth and San Antonio.

In Fort Worth, Dalfen acquired the new Mark IV Commerce Center, a three-building, more than 1 million-square-foot industrial park at Interstate 35W and Interstate 820. The buildings were developed by Crow Holdings Industrial.

Dalfen also purchased two industrial buildings north of San Antonio off Interstate 35.

“Best-in-class properties in exceptional infill locations make these acquisitions a natural fit for our rapidly growing portfolio,” Sean Dalfen, president and chief investment officer of Dalfen Industrial, said in a statement.

Dalfen Industrial now owns more than 4 million square feet of industrial buildings in Texas.

Dalfen Industrial bought the Mark IV Commerce Center in North Fort Worth.
Dalfen Industrial bought the Mark IV Commerce Center in North Fort Worth.(Dalfen Industrial )

Source Article

(Reuters) – The European Union’s new trade chief has told the U.S. to withdraw tariffs on more than $7 billion of EU products or face additional duties on exports to Europe, as he urged a settlement to the dispute over Airbus SE

and Boeing Co

, the Financial Times reported on Sunday. 

Repairing the transatlantic relationship would be EU’s top priority, and the U.S. should withdraw its Airbus-related tariffs as a confidence-building measure, the EU’s new trade chief Valdis Dombrovskis told https://on.ft.com/2GEqmap the FT.

“Of course, if the US is not withdrawing their tariffs we have no choice but to then introduce our tariffs,” he was quoted as saying.

Washington was awarded the right by the World Trade Organization (WTO) last October, to impose tariffs on $7.5 billion of annual EU imports in its case against Airbus. Washington then imposed 25% duties on products ranging from single-malt whisky to olives and cheese and 10% tariffs on most European-made Airbus jets.

In mid-February, the U.S. government said it would increase tariffs on aircraft imported from the EU to 15% from 10%, ratcheting up pressure on Brussels in a nearly 16-year dispute over aircraft subsidies.

The EU for its part, has been cleared by the WTO to impose tariffs on U.S. products worth $4 billion to retaliate against subsidies for American planemaker Boeing, sources told Reuters last month, with the award expected to be published within weeks.

Dombrovskis refused to speculate about the impact a Joe Biden presidency might have on the dispute, but told the FT that a more protectionist approach was something that came with the administration of Donald Trump.

“But in any case we will be engaging . . . and trying to bring the US administration back within the framework of multilateralism,” he added.

(Reporting by Bhargav Acharya

As President Donald Trump fights to win battleground state Michigan, there is evidence that his tariff policies have hurt his chances. Steel and agriculture are important industries in the state and billions of dollars have been lost due to tariffs.

In March 2018, the Trump administration imposed a 25% tariff on steel in order to protect American steel mills from foreign competition. The tariffs decreased demand for steel from the auto industry and other consumers, hurting steel plants.

Great Lakes Works, one of the largest mills in Michigan, laid off 1,250 workers in June and shut down steelmaking operations. The plant is owned by Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel.

A Reuters analysis reveals that Michigan steelmakers have issued layoff notices to 2,000 workers since the tariffs were implemented. 

The trade war has also hurt Michigan farmers. When Trump announced new tariffs on $60 billion of Chinese imports in May 2019, some farmers spoke out against the move. 

“The noose is getting tighter,” president of the Michigan Agri-Business Association Jim Byrum told the Detroit Free Press that month. “We have lost market opportunities. We’re not shipping soybeans around the world like we normally would. We’re not shipping them to China. China was our biggest soybean consumer, and they’re not moving.”

The Agriculture Department launched the Market Facilitation Program (MFP) to help farmers in 2019. The program distributes payments to farmers negatively impacted by the trade war. 

A report by the Government Accountability Office published in September found Michigan farmers received less on average from the MFP than farmers in other states.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland notes that Americans have paid over $60 billion in tariffs since the trade war began. In Michigan, more than $2 billion in tariffs have been paid by taxpayers while 1.1 million jobs in the state are supported by