(Reuters) – Tesla Inc <TSLA.O> Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Wednesday the company will produce Model Y with a new structural battery design and technology at its Berlin factory next year and that could result in a “significant production risk”.

The U.S. electric carmaker plans to manufacture a new version of its Model Y crossover vehicle, and possibly even battery cells at the site. Last month, Musk said that Tesla will use its Germany-based plant to demonstrate a radical overhaul of how its cars are built.

The company plans to start the production of Model Y at Gigafactory Berlin during the second half of 2021.

Tesla’s new battery cell – a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make – is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030.

The company’s new structural battery pack requires the new 4680 battery cells in order to work.

Musk said on Wednesday that it will take about two years for Tesla factories in Fremont and Shanghai to embrace the new technology.

“Fremont and Shanghai will transition in 2 years when new tech is proven,” Musk said in a tweet https://bit.ly/2I8Gam3.

The company said last week that it delivered 139,300 vehicles in the third quarter, a quarterly record for the electric carmaker.

Tesla’s delivery push has been supported by its new Shanghai factory, the only plant currently producing vehicles outside California, as it is also building a new vehicle and battery manufacturing facility near Berlin.

(Reporting by Sabahatjahan Contractor and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

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(Reuters) – Tesla Inc

Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Wednesday the company will produce Model Y with a new structural battery design and technology at its Berlin factory next year and that could result in a “significant production risk”.

The U.S. electric carmaker plans to manufacture a new version of its Model Y crossover vehicle, and possibly even battery cells at the site. Last month, Musk said that Tesla will use its Germany-based plant to demonstrate a radical overhaul of how its cars are built.

The company plans to start the production of Model Y at Gigafactory Berlin during the second half of 2021.

Tesla’s new battery cell – a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make – is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030.

The company’s new structural battery pack requires the new 4680 battery cells in order to work.

Musk said on Wednesday that it will take about two years for Tesla factories in Fremont and Shanghai to embrace the new technology.

“Fremont and Shanghai will transition in 2 years when new tech is proven,” Musk said in a tweet https://bit.ly/2I8Gam3.

The company said last week that it delivered 139,300 vehicles in the third quarter, a quarterly record for the electric carmaker.

Tesla’s delivery push has been supported by its new Shanghai factory, the only plant currently producing vehicles outside California, as it is also building a new vehicle and battery manufacturing facility near Berlin.

(Reporting by Sabahatjahan Contractor and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Name three things these five companies have in common: AutoZone,

Booking Holdings,

Cable One,

NVR

and

Seaboard.

One: Their shares are among the priciest in the U.S. stock market — all in four figures. Two: They have almost never split their stock. Three: All enjoy among the highest-quality shareholders measured by long-term horizon and portfolio concentration.

These are not coincidences, yet the shared experience seems lost on the increasing number of companies doing stock splits, from

Apple

(ticker: AAPL) to

Tesla

(TSLA). Both of these companies recently split their stock in order to cut share price. They apparently are trying to attract shareholders who will also be customers. But while that might be good product marketing, it is definitely bad investor stewardship: Stock splits degrade a company’s shareholder quality.

Managers and investors alike should care about which shareholders grace a company’s shareholder list. At companies brimming with transient shareholders, managers bend toward a short-term focus, while those dominated by indexers get shareholder proposals and votes aligning with prevailing social and political fashions.

Some companies attract a greater proportion than others of patient and focused shareholders — what Warren Buffett has dubbed “high-quality shareholders” (QSs for short). While all public companies have transients and indexers among their shareholders, those with a higher density of QSs get longer strategic runways that are associated with superior performance.

Companies shape their shareholder base through dozens of corporate practices. Actions that focus on stock price tend to draw transients while those emphasizing business performance attract QSs. Stock splits are riveted on stock price; managers who cultivate quality shareholders shun them.

After all, stock splits are like exchanging a dime for two nickels. They produce no economic effect, but carry subtle psychological ones. Side-effects include increasing a company’s market capitalization, despite no change in

For Immediate Release

Chicago, IL – October 7, 2020 – Zacks.com announces the list of stocks featured in the Analyst Blog. Every day the Zacks Equity Research analysts discuss the latest news and events impacting stocks and the financial markets. Stocks recently featured in the blog include General Motors GM, Ford F, Fiat Chrysler FCAU, Tesla TSLA and Honda HMC.

Here are highlights from Tuesday’s Analyst Blog:

Big 3 Detroit Automakers in Focus: How Have They Fared?

After plunging the most in the second quarter since the Great Recession, the U.S. auto industry gathered momentum in the third quarter, with sales rebounding from coronavirus-led lows and buyers returning to showrooms. Sales growth for September marked the first monthly rise since February. Unless there is a spike in coronavirus cases, which will trigger another round of lockdown and send vehicle deliveries into a tailspin, auto sales in the United States are likely to gain traction going forward. Increasing consumer confidence, declining unemployment rate and Fed’s efforts to support the economy bode well for the auto industry, which is highly cyclical in nature.

Amid the improving landscape, let’s take a look at how the Big 3 automakers namely General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler are currently faring. General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler are three of the oldest auto firms dated 1908, 1903 and 1925, respectively. While relatively new auto firms including Tesla are surely beefing up competition, especially in the electric vehicle space, these three legacy automakers have certainly stood the test of time and remain trusted picks for investors and consumers alike. While Fiat Chrysler currently sports a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy), General Motors and Ford carry a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) and 3 (Hold), respectively. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank stocks here

  • Tesla just reported record Q3 vehicles deliveries, which will result in more renewable energy credits it can sell to automakers like Ford, GM and Fiat Chrysler.
  • Other electric vehicle start-ups, such as Nio, Rivian, Lordstown Motors and Nikola, could benefit from zero-emission vehicle credits in the years to come.
  • More U.S. states are planning credit programs or will make existing ones stricter, and cover more classes of vehicles, including trucks.
  • The emissions trading market has proven to be a successful example of climate finance.



Elon Musk preparing food in a kitchen: Elon Musk guest appearance on CBS sitcom


Elon Musk guest appearance on CBS sitcom

Tesla’s ability to manufacture electric vehicles without losing money has been a constant concern for investors. As renewable energy credits have played a significant role in the recent string of quarterly profits from Elon Musk’s EV company, they have been a source of some frustration for Wall Street analysts — who have struggled to get a handle on how much revenue these credits will rack up in any quarter — as well as generating skepticism from investors.

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But there’s nothing dubious about the renewable energy credit market. In fact, Tesla’s domination of zero-emission vehicle credit trading — where it is estimated to have sold more credits than any other company — is an example of a climate finance mechanism that is working as it was designed to work. Tesla, unlike traditional automakers, risked it all on making and selling EVs. Meanwhile, traditional car companies are required to pay up, by other means, for the choice of delaying their transition to battery electric or fuel cell electric zero-emission vehicles.

“The last thing a company wants to do is pay their competitor to eat their own lunch,” said Simon Mui, deputy director of the clean vehicles & fuels group at the Natural Resources Defense Council. But he added that