CLEVELAND, Ohio — One of the most contentious political debates in Northeast Ohio this year is not about the presidential election, control of the Senate or even the Ohio Statehouse corruption scandal.

It’s about zoning in Pepper Pike.

Hundreds of yard signs bearing the phrase “No to Mixed-Use” are scattered throughout the small, well-to-do far-eastern suburb. They line the sidewalk-less residential streets as part of an effort that opposition organizer Manny Naft said aims to keep the city’s “bucolic” nature.

The signs refer to a measure on the Nov. 3 ballot to change the zoning for a 68-acre tract of land owned by behavioral health services nonprofit Beech Brook, along with two smaller adjoining lots. The issue has divided the community.

The division resulted in online bickering, contentious town hall meetings, threats of defamation lawsuits and even unused condoms left at Axiom Development Principal Bryan Stone’s home.

Stone, who lives in Pepper Pike, announced last month that he and the project’s investors scrapped plans to buy and develop the property at Lander Road and Chagrin Boulevard with houses, townhouses, office space and retail. After a lot of planning, he blamed the rancor surrounding the project.

“We will not move forward and invest time and energy on an idea that has been completely removed from the realm of civil discourse,” he wrote in a Sept. 25 news release.

However, Pepper Pike voters still have a chance to vote on the zoning change in November’s election. The proposal remains on the ballot.

Beech Brook CEO Tom Royer said in an email that the nonprofit decided not to pull the measure when Stone backed out. Early voting began Tuesday.

Regardless, the organization is now out of a deal to sell a property it longer needs to carry out its mission. The nonprofit has

LAKEWOOD, Ohio — Nearly two weeks after Lakewood announced it reached an agreement to part ways with Carnegie Management and Development Corporation regarding the proposed $72 million mixed-use One Lakewood Place development, city officials are talking about the decision.

“We’re paying Carnegie $255,000 to avoid future litigation, which could tie up the site for years to come,” Lakewood Mayor Meghan George said. “We believe this was in the best interest of the city.

“My focus is to ensure that we’re in the best position to move forward. The outcome of this settlement allows the city to begin a new chapter with a new developer on this site. We’re looking forward to that.”

The mayor noted the agreement includes the city retaining Carnegie-completed market studies, surveys and geotechnical reports that will provide value for any future developer.

“It’s disappointing that this partnership fell through,” Lakewood City Council President Daniel J. O’Malley said. “We wanted to have some finality about the matter, so we reached a settlement with Carnegie. It’s very important that that site not be encumbered by any litigation or potential litigation. It bought our freedom.

“You have cities that have these sites tied up for 30 years with litigation. This allows us to avoid that. We’re also conscious of the fact that lawsuits are expensive, even if you win. The settlement amount we reached with Carnegie is a fraction of what we’d likely spend on attorney fees alone.”

Located on the 5.7-acre site of the former Lakewood Hospital at the corner of Detroit and Belle avenues, One Lakewood Place included 200 apartments and 12 townhomes with retail and office spaces.

The mayor noted resetting the project could bring changes to the next development.

“This provides us an opportunity to re-examine the site,” George said. “There are some things that

BAY CITY, MI – Bay City’s South End is one step closer to becoming the new home of a state-of-the-art marijuana growing facility that promises to bring about 100 jobs to the area.

On Monday, Oct. 5, the Bay City Commission approved an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate application for Shango Park Bay City Inc. to allow the company to rehabilitate a vacant 24,800-square-foot building located at 1601 Garfield. The approved IFT is for the total amount of $7 million for 12 years.

Shango’s proposed plan involves turning the empty building and its 5-acre property into a mixed-use facility for marijuana cultivation, processing and storage, with the possibility for corporate offices. The existing structure will primarily be used for cultivation and offices while additions are planned to include a bakery and extraction lab.

Construction is slated to start in Fall of 2020, with the first phase of construction estimated to be wrapped up in Spring 2021.

Shango’s website refers to itself as a leading medical and recreational medical dispensary license holder, grower and manufacturer in multiple states across the country. Shango currently has facilities and sells products in Oregon, Nevada and Washington, with the plan to strengthen Michigan as a new player in its roster. Shango currently has a medical marijuana provisioning center in Lapeer but the company has larger plans for the Bay City location.

Matt Kowalski of Warren-based Shango was in attendance at Monday’s meeting to clarify details for commissioners about the tax abatement and plans for the property.

In exchange for the tax exemption, Shango plans to revamp the property and add approximately 100 new jobs of varying skill level.

“We’ll have jobs anywhere from janitorial staff all the way up to PhD’s,” said Kowalski.

In addition, Kowalski stated that the company is planning a provisioning center

Sales

ClearWorth Capital has purchased the Renaissance Parc apartments at the Dallas North Tollway and Verde Valley in Far North Dallas. The 294-unit apartment community is adjacent to the Village on the Parkway shopping center. Jay Gunn with Berkadia brokered the sale with the help of Chris Mendenhall at ClearWorth Capital. Nathan Stone and Brad Mason with Berkadia provided financing. ClearWorth Capital is an independent real estate investment firm that owns more than a dozen properties in Texas.

I-20 Industrial LP purchased 14.6 acres from HCH Farms Ltd. of Dallas at 34980 LBJ Freeway in Dallas. HSM Equity Partners will build a 15,540-square-foot facility for OTR Fleet Service, a provider of maintenance services for commercial vehicles. OTR is relocating from Forney. Huntley Luna and Nick Robinson at Henry S. Miller Brokerage brokered the sale with Tom Clarke with Transwestern. Mark Smith Sr. of HSM Equity Partners will develop the facility.

Khop Management has purchased 1426 N Riverfront Blvd., a 4,265 square foot building in the Dallas Design District. The building will be the home of Kirk Hopper Fine Art and was sold by Quadrant Investment Properties. Matthew Otte of Whitebox Real Estate brokered the sale. The lease was arranged by Christy Thelen, Trey Smith, Ward Eastman and Lauren Napper of Cushman & Wakefield.

An investor has purchased the Bocks Board Packaging building, a 69,750-square-foot industrial property at 1520 East Wintergreen Road in Hutchins. Adam Abushagur and Sam Martin of Marcus & Millichap brokered the sale.

An investor has acquired a freestanding 2,866-square-foot Burger King on a 29,980-square-foot site located at 2215 W. University Drive in Denton. Matthew Rosenfeld with Weitzman handled negotiations.

A Dallas investor purchased the Bonita Gardens Apartments, a two-story 138-unit rental community located at 3410 Fordham Road in Dallas. Mark Allen and Courtland Charles of Colliers International

After nearly four decades of sporting events and concerts, more than 20,000 people gathered in April 2010 to watch as an implosion leveled Texas Stadium in Irving.

The stadium, which opened in October 1971, was known as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. It was also recognized for its gaping hole at the top of the stadium, a result of abandoned plans for a retractable roof. In the 1980s and 1990s, The Jacksons, Madonna and Willie Nelson performed at the stadium to crowds of 65,000 people.

After the Cowboys moved to AT&T Stadium in Arlington, the site of the former Texas Stadium has remained vacant. That’s why reader Don Walther asked Curious Texas: “What is being planned for the former Texas Stadium site in Irving?”

The city of Irving leased the site to the Texas Department of Transportation to be used as a staging area for a construction project, said Philip Sanders, assistant city manager for the city of Irving. The News reported in July that the site will be part of a major construction project called the Diamond Interchange.

Texas Stadium, long before its implosion in 2010, is seen in this file photo from 1971. Irving hopes to fill the now-vacant site with mixed-use development.

The $355 million project will begin in Octobe. It, will interconnect Highway 114, State Highway 183 and Loop 12. The diamond interchange will be constructed by TxDOT and is expected to be completed in 2025, according to a news release.

“After it’s complete, what will happen is it will provide much better access to the properties in and around the convergence of those three highways,” Sanders said.

Another piece of infrastructure being added to the site of the former stadium is a 500-foot “Signature Bridge” that will span SH 114. The bridge, slated to be finished by the end of the year, will connect from the site to a new Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Orange Line Station and more