• Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, has settled its compensation fight with former co-CEO Eileen Murray. 
  • A spokesperson confirmed the deal, but offered no details on the settlement size or terms.
  • Murray originally filed her lawsuit in July, saying the firm balked on up to $100 million in deferred pay after she disclosed her internal dispute to an industry body. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Bridgewater Associates settled a multimillion-dollar gender pay-disparity lawsuit with its former co-CEO Eileen Murray for an undisclosed amount of money, it said Monday.

A spokesperson for the Connecticut-based hedge fund confirmed the settlement to Business Insider, saying: “We are pleased that we were able to amicably and fairly resolve the discussions around Eileen’s post-employment benefits.”

Murray, who helmed the $140 billion firm from 2009 to earlier this year, originally filed her complaint in July after departing. She claimed the firm withheld up to $100 million in deferred compensation after she told FINRA about the pay dispute when joining the self-regulatory body’s board of directors.

“Bridgewater has used a false and otherwise grossly expanded, bad faith assertion under the terms of the Plan to claim forfeiture of Ms. Murray’s earned Deferred Compensation, all as part of a cynical plan to intimidate and silence her,” she said in the lawsuit.

The Bridgewater spokesperson declined to elaborate on the size or terms of its settlement with Murray.

“We have a tremendous amount of respect for Eileen and the many contributions she made to Bridgewater during her 10 years of helping to lead the company,” their statement continued. “She will always be a valued member of the Bridgewater community and we wish her well in her various new ventures.”

In September, The Wall Street Journal reported that another high-ranking woman at the hedge fund, research director

Federal prosecutors say the owners of the horse racing track in New Orleans have agreed to pay a $2.8 million penalty for letting horse manure and urine into the city’s drainage system

The U.S. Justice Department described the fine to be paid by Churchill Downs Inc., owner of the Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, as the largest ever paid by a “concentrated animal feeding” operation under the Clean Water Act, news outlets reported.

The agreement settles a federal complaint alleging that the Fair Grounds violated that law and the track’s state permit more than 250 times between 2012 and 2018.

“This consent decree will stop the flow of untreated process wastewater into the local sewer system, which leads to local waters used for fishing and ultimately Lake Pontchartrain, in a way that recognizes the challenges presented by the racetrack’s urban location.” said Jonathan Brightbill, principal deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division, said Tuesday in a news release.

Churchill Downs, based in Louisville, Kentucky, said it has worked with federal, state and local environmental agencies to find ways to deal with wastewater and stormwater at the New Orleans track. It “has agreed to meaningful measures, including $5.6 million of capital improvements over the next three years, to address the conditions and obligations under the consent decree,” the company told The Times-Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate.

Neighborhoods the government considers environmental justice communities surround the