After seven months of darkness, some movie screens in the Seattle area will light up on Friday. Newly revised state coronavirus restrictions are allowing cinemas to reopen at 25% capacity, and while some operators are choosing to remain closed, others are eagerly preparing to resume business — for an audience that may still be deciding whether to return.

“It is a personal choice, and I understand that and I don’t want to minimize the concern that people may have,” said Jeff Brein, managing partner of the local chain Far Away Entertainment. “I think what we can do is what retailers have done, what restaurants have done … and that is to do everything that we can to provide a safe environment.”

Far Away is reopening seven of its eight theaters, including the Admiral in West Seattle and the Varsity in the University District, on Friday. (The eighth, Ocean Shores Cinema, reopened in the summer, as it is in a Phase 3 county.)  

Also reopening Friday are 14 multiplexes in the AMC chain across the state, including Pacific Place in downtown Seattle. And Cinemark announced Tuesday that it will reopen its four theaters in the state Friday, including two at Bellevue’s Lincoln Square and multiplexes in Federal Way and Tacoma.

Most of the Seattle area’s locally owned theaters — including SIFF, Majestic Bay, Ark Lodge, Grand Illusion and Northwest Film Forum — have announced that they will not reopen at this time, citing both safety and business concerns. “It’s going to be extremely challenging at 25%,” Brein acknowledged. And some of the chain multiplexes will remain dark: Regal Cinemas has announced a nationwide closure for the foreseeable future.

But Brein said he’s eager to demonstrate to moviegoers that it’s safe to return to cinemas again, and his theaters are reopening after

SEATTLE — Boeing said Thursday it will shut down the original assembly line for its two-aisle 787 jetliner near Seattle and consolidate the plane’s production in South Carolina as the airline industry tries to weather the global pandemic.

The move will begin in mid-2021. The company intends to keep assembling other jetliners — the 737, 747, 767 and 777 — in the Seattle area.

“Consolidating to a single 787 production location in South Carolina will make us more competitive and efficient, better positioning Boeing to weather these challenging times and win new business,” Stan Deal, CEO of Boeing’s commercial aircraft business, told workers in an email.

The company did not immediately say whether jobs would be eliminated in the move, but Rep. J.T. Wilcox, the Republican leader of the state House of Representatives, posted on Facebook following a call with the company that the decision would affect about 900 jobs in Washington state.

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had a statewide workforce of more than 70,000 people before announcing in April that it was cutting 10% of its employees.

The 787 is used mostly for international routes. Washington state in 2003 granted Boeing massive tax breaks — amounting to about $100 million a year — to entice the company to assemble the plane in the state. The subsidies were revoked earlier this year after the World Trade Organization found them illegal.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee called Thursday’s decision on 787 prodiction “an insult” and said the state would have to review tax breaks Boeing continues to receive.

“I understand the serious market forces Boeing faces today,” Inslee said. “What I don’t understand is why the company can’t commit to restoring production here when the market for this plane improves.”

At an afternoon news conference Inslee said he had multiple conversations with Boeing

SEATTLE (AP) — Boeing said Thursday it will shut down the original assembly line for its two-aisle 787 jetliner near Seattle and consolidate the plane’s production in South Carolina as the airline industry tries to weather the global pandemic.

The move will begin in mid-2021. The company intends to keep assembling other jetliners — the 737, 747, 767 and 777 — in the Seattle area.

“Consolidating to a single 787 production location in South Carolina will make us more competitive and efficient, better positioning Boeing to weather these challenging times and win new business,” Stan Deal, CEO of Boeing’s commercial aircraft business, told workers in an email.


The company did not immediately say whether jobs would be eliminated in the move, but Rep. J.T. Wilcox, the Republican leader of the state House of Representatives, posted on Facebook following a call with the company that the decision would affect about 900 jobs in Washington state.

Boeing had a statewide workforce of more than 70,000 people before announcing in April that it was cutting 10% of its employees.

The 787 is used mostly for international routes. Washington state in 2003 granted Boeing massive tax breaks — amounting to about $100 million a year — to entice the company to assemble the plane in the state. The subsidies were revoked earlier this year after the World Trade Organization found them illegal.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee called Thursday’s decision on 787 prodiction “an insult” and said the state would have to review tax breaks Boeing continues to receive.

“I understand the serious market forces Boeing faces today,” Inslee said. “What I don’t understand is why the company can’t commit to restoring production here when the market for this plane improves.”

Employees at Boeing’s plant in Everett, Washington, began building the 787 in 2007, turning

Uber’s treatment of its drivers has been under intense scrutiny this year, with many localities enforcing new rules on the ride-sharing company, including hourly wages. On Tuesday, Seattle became the latest city to enforce a minimum hourly wage on both Uber and Lyft.

As of January, both ride-sharing operations will be required to pay drivers at least $16 an hour, the minimum wage in Seattle for businesses with 500 or more employees. The decision to enforce this rule on Uber and Lyft was passed by the Seattle City Council in a unanimous 9-0 vote, the New York Times reports.

“The pandemic has exposed the fault lines in our systems of worker protections, leaving many frontline workers like gig workers without a safety net,” Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said about the decision.

Seattle is the second major city to pass a measure like this, following on from New York City’s measure in 2018. The minimum wage for these drivers in the Big Apple is currently set at $17.22 after expenses.

California as a whole also recently passed a bill that requires ride-sharing companies to classify drivers as employees and not independent contractors, which had allowed them to avoid paying hourly minimum wage, offering overtime pay, offering workers’ compensation, and providing unemployment insurance.

Uber and Lyft, for their parts, have strongly opposed these measures, attempting to spin their treatment of drivers as necessary for keeping costs low. Both have supported a measure on the California ballot in November that would exempt their drivers from the law reclassifying them as employees.

Uber said it intends to become "zero emissions" by 2040 as it moves to transition mainly to electric vehicles, as part of an effort to fight climate change Uber said it intends to become “zero emissions” by 2040 as it moves to transition mainly to electric vehicles, as part of an effort to fight climate change Photo: AFP / Josh Edelson

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