Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose 4 percent over the past year, outpacing the increase in workers’ wages and the rate of inflation, according to an analysis released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Average annual premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance are now $7,470 for a single plan and $21,342 for a family plan, up 4 percent from the previous year. Those dollar amounts include both worker and employer contributions.

Meanwhile, wages increased by 3.4 percent alongside 2.1 percent inflation. 

About 157 million people get their insurance through work, and the costs have steadily risen over the years.

The average premium for family coverage, including the employer contribution, has increased 22 percent over the last five years and 55 percent over the last decade.

In 2020, on average, workers contributed 17 percent of the premium for single coverage — about $1,243 — and 27 percent for family coverage, or about $5,588.

Rising health care costs have been one of the reasons behind stagnant wages.

Eighty-three percent of covered workers had an annual deductible for single coverage that must be met because most services are paid for by the plan, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation analysis.

The average deductible for single coverage was $1,644 in 2020, similar to the average deductible last year.

Sixty-five percent of covered workers have coinsurance that requires they pay for a percentage of their care of meeting their deductible.

The analysis concluded that health care costs were stable in 2020, with premium increases modest and consistent with recent years. However, as the analysis was conducted in the early days of the pandemic, it doesn’t address how employers responded to it.

BERLIN (Reuters) – Orders for German-made goods rose 4.5% in August, more than expected, boosting hopes for a robust third-quarter in Europe’s largest economy after the coronavirus shock.

The increases were driven by demand from the euro zone, the Federal Statistics Office said on Tuesday, suggesting companies are making good progress back to pre-crisis levels. A Reuters forecast had predicted a 2.6% gain on the previous month.

“The catch-up process for new industry orders is continuing at a remarkable pace,” the economy ministry said in a statement.

Order intake was now only 3.6% lower than in February, before lockdown measures were imposed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the office said.

Economists applauded the strong data, but cautioned that rising infection rates across Europe were increasing the risk of setbacks.

“It is difficult to imagine how German manufacturing could escape another round of lockdown measures with important trading partners,” said ING Bank economist Carsten Brzeski.

“Nevertheless, today’s industrial order data suggest that full order books – at least in the near future – could help the manufacturing sector to overtake the service sector.”

Official figures released last week showed German retail sales rose much more than expected in August and unemployment fell further in September, boosting hopes that household spending would power a recovery.

Figures from the statistics office showed that orders from abroad increased by 6.5%, boosted by a 14.6% surge in orders from the rest of the euro zone. Domestic orders rose by 1.7% on the month.

The German economy contracted by 9.7% in the second quarter as household spending, company investments and trade collapsed at the height of the pandemic.

An easing of lockdown measures, coupled with an unprecedented array of rescue and stimulus packages, has led to a robust recovery in the third quarter, but