UFC on ESPN 16 post-event facts: Holly Holm sets multiple personal records



Holly Holm standing in front of a crowd: The oddsmakers and public see this as a close fight, listing Holm -120 and Aldana +100 as of this writing.  Despite being very familiar with both fighters, I, too, admittedly had trouble making a solid read, much less a pick that I'm comfortable with.  I don't disagree with the current favorite, as Holm is probably the safer pick in this spot. Not only does Holm carry an edge in combat sports experience overall, but this will be Aldana's first time potentially going five rounds under the UFC banner.  The Mexican fighter has fought in two title fights previously (in the Jungle Fight and Invicta FC promotions), losing them both via stoppage. That said, those fights came early in Aldana's career and were against legitimate competition in Larissa Pacheco and Tonya Evinger (the latter a fight where Aldana was also battling the flu).  Furthermore, Aldana – like a lot of my favorite Mexican fighters – seems to get stronger as the fight goes on, which suits her high-output sensibilities well. Nevertheless, I will still be curious to see how Alanda deals with her first high-level southpaw.  Although I already stated that we could see fewer kicks and a less-confident jab early, I do believe that Aldana's up-jab variation to a cross could have some serious play and would not be surprised to see her high kick come to life in this open-stance affair. However, I suspect Aldana's counter right will be the ultimate weapon to watch out for.  From her first fight with Pennington to her defeats at the hands of Valentina Shevchenko, Germaine de Randamie and Amanda Nunes, the counter right hand has been a well-known kryptonite for Holm in both boxing and MMA. Add in the fact that Holm’s patterns seem to be – especially at this point in her career – very deeply rooted, and I suspect that Aldana can find enough openings to get her groove going as this fight wears on.  Unless Holm is able to hurt Aldana or demonstrate grappling and clinch dominance early and often, then I'm not sure her point-scoring style will be enough to combat the output that will likely be coming back at her. For that reason, I'll somewhat reluctantly side with Aldana to outwork her 38-year-old foe down the stretch, leaving the door open for a possible finish late. Prediction: Aldana by decision


© Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports
The oddsmakers and public see this as a close fight, listing Holm -120 and Aldana +100 as of this writing. Despite being very familiar with both fighters, I, too, admittedly had trouble making a solid read, much less a pick that I’m comfortable with. I don’t disagree with the current favorite, as Holm is probably the safer pick in this spot. Not only does Holm carry an edge in combat sports experience overall, but this will be Aldana’s first time potentially going five rounds under the UFC banner. The Mexican fighter has fought in two title fights previously (in the Jungle Fight and Invicta FC promotions), losing them both via stoppage. That said, those fights came early in Aldana’s career and were against legitimate competition in Larissa Pacheco and Tonya Evinger (the latter a fight where Aldana was also battling the flu). Furthermore, Aldana – like a lot of my favorite Mexican fighters – seems to get stronger as the fight goes on, which suits her high-output sensibilities well. Nevertheless, I will still be curious to see how Alanda deals with her first high-level southpaw. Although I already stated that we could see fewer kicks and a less-confident jab early, I do believe that Aldana’s up-jab variation to a cross could have some serious play and would not be surprised to see her high kick come to life in this open-stance affair. However, I suspect Aldana’s counter right will be the ultimate weapon to watch out for. From her first fight with Pennington to her defeats at the hands of Valentina Shevchenko, Germaine de Randamie and Amanda Nunes, the counter right hand has been a well-known kryptonite for Holm in both boxing

The world of exchange-traded assets just keeps getting bigger.

Exchange-traded funds and exchange-traded products pulled in a record $7 trillion-plus in assets in August, with U.S.-based ETFs and ETPs accounting for some $4 trillion of those flows. The U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan’s exchange-traded markets all also reached historic highs for asset-gathering.

A key factor driving the inflows is a renewed sense of confidence among investors, Deborah Fuhr, the founder and managing partner of ETFGI, told CNBC’s “ETF Edge” on Monday.

“ETFs really busted the myths that they weren’t able to handle the significant volatility in inflows and outflows during March and April,” Fuhr said. “From there, what we’re seeing is a significant increase in the number of investors using ETFs.”

Nearly 6,000 institutions now hold about half of all ETF assets across 62 countries, Fuhr said. As for where the money’s going, fixed-income-based products top the list, with $160 billion of net inflows globally in August, up from $148 billion over the same time period last year, she said.

“The Fed has clearly given a good signal to people that ETFs, fixed income, high yield and investment grade are good investments,” Fuhr said.

Themes such as ESG, which stands for Environmental, Social and Governance-related investments, technology and health care have also captured investors’ attention and money, she added.

“We’re also seeing active nontransparent. We have 15 new launches this year gathering about [$]500 million so far,” she said. “And gold has clearly played two different views there for investors. They’re in [$]49 billion of net inflows. Some see it as a safe haven. Others see it as a potential hedge against inflation given all the stimulus going into the markets.”

Kim Arthur, the president and CEO of Main Management, agreed that ETFs proving their resilience was a major catalyst