M.D.C. Holdings (MDC) is a buy for the total return and dividend income investor. M.D.C. Holdings is among the largest homebuilders in the United States and has an increasing owned backlog of over 17,000 lots to develop and options on another 7,000.

The company has steady growth and has the cash it uses to develop new properties and homes for the average home buyer. The lower interest rates give a tailwind to the company business. The Fed has indicated that they intend to keep interest rates low for at least a year or maybe two.

As I have said before in previous articles.

I use a set of guidelines that I codified over the last few years to review the companies in The Good Business Portfolio (my portfolio) and other companies that I am reviewing. For a complete set of guidelines, please see my article “The Good Business Portfolio: Update to Guidelines, March 2020”. These guidelines provide me with a balanced portfolio of income, defensive, total return, and growing companies that hopefully keeps me ahead of the Dow average.

When I scanned the five-year chart, M.D.C Holdings has a good chart going up and to the right for 2016, 2017, and 2019 in a strong solid pattern. It is a cyclic company and was down in 2015 and has recovered well in 2019 from the flat year of 2018. 2020 was doing good until the pandemic hit, then it went down like a rock in water but has recovered nicely in the past six months. The PE is low at 11, and the earnings growth looks good at 10%, making MDC a strong buy.

ChartData by YCharts

Fundamentals and company business review

The method I use to compare companies is to look at the total return, as shown from my

The iShares Russell Top 200 ETF (IWL) was launched on 09/22/2009, and is a passively managed exchange traded fund designed to offer broad exposure to the Large Cap Blend segment of the US equity market.

The fund is sponsored by Blackrock. It has amassed assets over $831.13 million, making it one of the larger ETFs attempting to match the Large Cap Blend segment of the US equity market.

Why Large Cap Blend

Large cap companies usually have a market capitalization above $10 billion. They tend to be stable companies with predictable cash flows and are usually less volatile than mid and small cap companies.

Blend ETFs usually hold a mix of growth and value stocks as well as stocks that exhibit both value and growth characteristics.

Costs

When considering an ETF’s total return, expense ratios are an important factor, and cheaper funds can significantly outperform their more expensive counterparts in the long term if all other factors remain equal.

Annual operating expenses for this ETF are 0.15%, making it one of the cheaper products in the space.

It has a 12-month trailing dividend yield of 1.59%.

Sector Exposure and Top Holdings

Even though ETFs offer diversified exposure that minimizes single stock risk, investors should also look at the actual holdings inside the fund. Luckily, most ETFs are very transparent products that disclose their holdings on a daily basis.

This ETF has heaviest allocation to the Information Technology sector–about 31.30% of the portfolio. Healthcare and Consumer Discretionary round out the top three.

Looking at individual holdings, Apple Inc (AAPL) accounts for about 7.63% of total assets, followed by Microsoft Corp (MSFT) and Amazon Com Inc (AMZN).

The top 10 holdings account for about 32.61% of total assets under management.

Performance and Risk

IWL seeks to match the performance of the Russell