Lufax Holding, the operator of one of China’s biggest online wealth management platform, filed to go public in the US market, the latest Chinese company to shrug off concerns about worsening relations between the world’s two largest economies.

The Shanghai-based company is backed by China’s biggest insurer Ping An Insurance (Group) and follows in the footsteps of the insurer’s unit OneConnect Financial Technology, which raised US$312 million in its New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) debut in December.

Lufax said it plans to list its American depositary shares on the NYSE under the symbol, LU, it said in a regulatory filing early Thursday.

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Lufax did not disclose the size of its offering, using a common place holder figure of US$100 million in its filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission. But sources have said the IPO could raise between US$2 billion and US$3 billion.

Lufax was valued at US$39.4 billion during its last-known funding round at the end of 2018. It previously considered a Hong Kong listing in 2018, but that never materialised. Details of potential US listing by Cayman Island-registered Lufax first emerged in July.

In Thursday’s filing, Lufax showed it had a net profit of 7.2 billion yuan (US$1.03 billion) for the six months to June 30. It reported a net profit of 7.5 billion yuan a year earlier.

The company said it plans to use the proceeds from the offering for general corporate purposes, including product development, sales and marketing activities and improving its technology infrastructure.

The company stopped facilitating new peer-to-peer loans in August last year. As of June 30, outstanding peer-to-peer loans as a percentage of total client assets had declined to 12.8 per cent.

Goldman Sachs,

(Bloomberg) — HSBC Holdings Plc rose the most since 2009, recovering from a 25-year low, as its biggest shareholder raised its stake in a bet the embattled lender will return to paying dividends.

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China’s Ping An Insurance Group Co., which last week bought 10.8 million shares to boost its stake to 8%, remains confident in HSBC’s long-term prospects, a spokesperson said. The recent slump in the share and the valuation only increases HSBC’s appeal, the spokesperson said.

“Ping An believes HSBC’s suspension of dividend payments is a short-term issue and has been actively communicating with the lender about the possibility of restoring dividends in the future,” the spokesperson said.

HSBC shares in Hong Kong on Monday rose 9.2%, the biggest gain since April 2009, clawing back most of last week’s tumble and adding $6.8 billion to its market capitalization. In London, HSBC rose as much as 11.5% — also the most since April 2009. They were up 9% as of 10:55 a.m. local time, although they’re still down by almost half this year.

The bank last week plunged to a 25-year low in part on speculation its massive push into China could be thwarted. The ruling Communist Party’s Global Times newspaper reported that the bank could be put on an “unreliable entity” list that aims to punish firms or individuals that damage national security. HSBC has rankled China over its participation in the U.S. investigation of Huawei Technologies Co.

At the behest of U.K. regulators, the bank suspended its dividend payments earlier this year, alienating its Hong Kong retail investor base. The lender’s shares have trailed the Hang Seng Index in five out of the past six years once dividends are excluded. HSBC has pledged to review the payout once the impact of the pandemic becomes clearer.



chart: Stock rallies after hitting a 25-year low


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