Businesswoman, philanthropist, and television personality Bethenny Frankel is known for her bold and outspoken nature. Over the years, she has taken many calculated risks as an entrepreneur, investor, and lifestyle influencer. One of the best ‘risks’ has been speaking up as a woman in business. Now with much success, Frankel has taken on a new venture as the host of the “Just B with Bethenny Frankel” podcast which takes a nontraditional approach to business and lifestyle conversations with business luminaries.

To date, Mark Cuban, Television personality, Entrepreneur, and Owner of the Dallas Mavericks; Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer of Netflix; and Paris Hilton, Entrepreneur & DJ have joined Frankel on her show.

When it comes to speaking up, Frankel said that there are many ways to do business. Being fearless in her decision making and advocating for herself are two of the many things that have gotten her to where she is today.

In Business, Say What You Mean

“I’ve always been like this! Different people have different styles. Some people just go with their gut. Paris Hilton says that she goes with her gut, most people do. Other people like to pitch to ask around or to crowdsource because there are people around them that are smarter than them. There are many different styles to every type of business,” said Frankel.  

She went on to add, “We are alone in our decision making in business. Once you make that final decision, you sign that paper, you make that choice to say something, do something – it’s your choice alone. That fearlessness has really taken me far. I’ve always known that when you jump, you fly. When something feels wrong, but you just don’t have the

  • YouTube’s Partner Program lets creators monetize their videos with Google-placed ads. 
  • YouTube pays creators a certain rate based on the type of audience their videos attract, and often talking about money can net an influencer more per view than many other topics, according to finance creators.
  • We spoke with several finance influencers on exactly how much money they’ve made a month, per 100,000 views, and in a single year on YouTube. 
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Insider Influencers.

This is the latest installment of Business Insider’s YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

Attorney Erika Kullberg started her personal-finance YouTube channel one year ago after leaving her job as a corporate lawyer and she now has about 71,500 subscribers.

Though Kullberg’s YouTube channel doesn’t have millions of subscribers, she is still able to earn a sizeable amount of money each month because of her video content and the audience her channel attracts. She films videos about personal finance, passive income, investing, and stimulus-package updates.

The audiences these topics attract are valuable to advertisers, who usually pay more money for an informative business-related video than a vlog-style video. In short: Talking about money on YouTube can make creators a lot of it, according to some personal-finance creators like Kullberg. 

Toward the end of April, Kullberg’s channel was accepted into YouTube’s Partner Program — making May the first month she earned revenue off YouTube, she said. Her channel reached 1.8 million views that month, and her most viewed videos were about the stimulus package.

Business Insider spoke with several finance influencers on exactly how much money they’ve made per 1,000 ad views, per 100,000 views, in a month, in a year, and the most amount of money they’ve earned on a single YouTube video. 

Here’s a comprehensive

Mark J. Migliaccio announces the release of ‘1st Generation Rich’

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M., Sept. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Mark J. Migliaccio wanted to open the eyes of anyone who always wanted to start a business or invest in real estate but never knew how to get started. He wants to show that there are many more options to the daily grind and “working in a job you dislike with people you would never invite to one of your barbecues.” It is for these reasons that he writes “1st Generation Rich” (published by Archway Publishing), a book about how to build a money-generating machine that pays all your bills, become 1st Generation Rich while having fun doing it.

 

In this guide to building wealth, Migliaccio explores how to build a business that puts one in control of his/her valuable time, master the art of making money by investing in real estate and view money as a valuable tool instead of being taboo. He explains that by creating more options, one will have more freedoms.

 

“Technology has changed just about everything yet these basic principals have been the building blocks for any start up or investments for thousands of years,” Migliaccio points out. “I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel I just found a different way to become rich by taking the path that was less traveled. This journey is my personal story on how I was able to build a successful business and invest in real estate with a learning disability, no education, no money, no help and no safety net if I was to fail.”

 

When asked what he wants readers to take away from his writing of the book, Migliaccio replies, “This entire book from the 1st word to the last word was written with one goal in mind,

JPMorgan


  • JPMorgan will pay the largest CFTC monetary penalty ever and admitted wrongdoing in order to resolve a case surrounding claims of market manipulation in the trading of precious metals and Treasury securities, Bloomberg first reported.
  • The case covers an eight-year period and relates to the practice of “spoofing,” where traders put in large orders to buy or sell a security with no intention of executing the order, creating the appearance of demand or supply for a particular asset.
  • JPMorgan will pay $920 million, which includes a $436.4 million fine, $311.7 million in restitution, and $172 million in disgorgement.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

JPMorgan will pay $920 million and admit wrongdoing in order to resolve a case surrounding claims of market manipulation, Bloomberg first reported on Tuesday.

The $920 million payment represents the largest-ever monetary penalty imposed by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and consists of a $436.4 million fine, $311.7 million in restitution, and $172 million in disgorgement, according to a statement from the CFTC seen by Bloomberg.

The case covers an eight-year period and relates to the practice of “spoofing,” where traders put in large orders to buy or sell a security with no intention of executing the order, creating the appearance of demand or supply for a particular asset, and helping move that asset in the desired direction of the trader.

It’s unlawful to submit and cancel orders in a strategy intended to deceive other traders.

The settlement will put an end to a criminal investigation of the bank that has entangled a half-dozen employees. Two employees have entered guilty pleas, while four employees are facing trial, according to Bloomberg.

JPMorgan traded down as much as 2% on Tuesday.

Read more: The CEO of a $41 billion money manager says there will