AG Ferguson says the company agreed to pay $100,000 for failing to maintain records related to ads that ran from 2012 through 2019.

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Editor’s note: The above video aired at an earlier date.

Twitter is the latest social media giant to pay for violations of Washington state’s campaign finance disclosure rules. 

Attorney General Bob Ferguson says the company agreed to pay $100,000 for failing to maintain records related to ads that ran from 2012 through 2019, when Twitter banned political advertising. 

Companies are required to maintain records about who paid for ads, when they ran, how much they cost, and the name of the candidate or measure supported or opposed. 

Facebook and Google have also agreed to settlements of $200,000 each, though Ferguson filed a second lawsuit against Facebook in April.

The law requires commercial advertisers to maintain the following information regarding ads they sell so that the information is available for public inspection:

  • The name of the candidate or measure supported or opposed;
  • The dates the advertiser provided the service;
  • The name and address of the person who sponsored the advertising; and
  • The total cost of the advertising, who paid for it (which may be different than the sponsor) and what method of payment they used.

The state sued Facebook again for selling political ads without disclosing all necessary information about who’s behind them. 

Attorney General Bob Ferguson first sued Facebook over the issue in 2018, with the company agreeing to a $238,00 settlement. 

Rather than comply with all of the disclosure requirements of Washington campaign finance law, Facebook said it would no longer sell political ads in Washington state.

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Australia’s banking and insurance regulator has estimated the country should be spending about $3.5bn a year to limit damage from climate-related natural disasters, warning the cost of responding to them after the fact is likely to be 11 times greater.



a close up of an old building: Photograph: James Gourley/AAP


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Photograph: James Gourley/AAP

In a speech on Wednesday, Geoff Summerhayes, an executive board member of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority, said the cost of pre-emptive action to avoid the impact of disasters exacerbated by the climate crisis was far cheaper than dealing with the aftermath.

Addressing the issue of rising insurance premiums in northern Australia due to an increasing number of claims caused by storms and cyclones, Summerhayes said Apra was concerned general insurance could become unaffordable or unavailable in parts of the country.

He said it heightened the need to both cut greenhouse gas emissions and increase community resilience to extreme climate events, such as last summer’s catastrophic bushfires.

Related: Investors lead push for Australian business to cut emissions more than government forecasts

“Investing in the types of resilience, mitigation and hazard reduction measures needed to better protect Australian communities – and keep insurance affordable and accessible – comes at a cost,” he told an Australian Business Roundtable webinar. “But as we witnessed last summer, failing to take action can be far more costly in the long run, and the price paid is often far more valuable than can be measured in dollars.”

Summerhayes cited research by the business roundtable that predicted the total economic cost of natural disasters in Australia would reach $39bn a year by 2050. Based on evidence from the US that every $1 spent on resilience measures saves up to

$11 in response and recovery costs, he said covering those losses would require the community to invest about $3.5bn a

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

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Twitter must pay $100,000 to Washington state for campaign finance violations.

Twitter received nearly $200,000 for hosting campaign ads between 2012 and 2019 but did not disclose that information to Washington’s Public Disclosure Transparency Account in violation of state laws.

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“Transparency in political advertising is critical to a free and informed electorate,” Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said in a Tuesday statement. “Whether you are a local newspaper or a multinational social media platform, you must follow our campaign finance laws.”

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The social media platform banned political advertisements on the site in November of last year.

“This resolution is reflective of our commitment to transparency and accountability,” a Twitter spokesperson said in a statement to FOX Business. “We’ll continue working to uphold our commitment to transparency and to protect the health of the online public conversation, especially ahead of the 2020 U.S. Election.”

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An independent researcher in communication with the state Public Disclosure Commission requested records for ads for 12 campaigns between 2012 and 2019 from Twitter but did not hear back for two months, according to a press release.

“The people of Washington, in their overwhelming vote for the disclosure Initiative 276 nearly a half-century ago, created one of the nation’s most emphatic demands for transparency and accountability in campaign finance reporting,” Public Disclosure Commission Chair David Ammons said in a statement.

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Twitter will pay $100,000 to Washington after the social media platform failed to maintain public inspection records of nearly $200,000 paid to it for political ads in violation of state law, state Attorney General Bob Ferguson (D) says.



a close up of a computer: Twitter to pay $100,000 to Washington for violating state's campaign finance laws


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Twitter to pay $100,000 to Washington for violating state’s campaign finance laws

The judgement filed Tuesday in King County Superior Court asserts that since 2012, Twitter has failed to maintain records from at least 38 Washington candidates and committees that bought ads.

Washington’s campaign finance law requires political advertisers to retain records related to political ads.

“Transparency in political advertising is critical to a free and informed electorate,” Ferguson said in a statement. “Whether you’re a local newspaper or a multinational social media platform, you must follow our campaign finance laws.”

A Twitter spokesperson said the resolution with Washington is “reflective of our commitment to transparency and accountability,” noting the company’s decision to ban all political advertising starting in November 2019.

“We’ll continue working to uphold our commitment to transparency and to protect the health of the online public conversation, especially ahead of the 2020 U.S. Election,” the spokesperson added.

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The state’s suit against Twitter is one of several Ferguson has sought against tech giants over political advertising.

The attorney general in December of 2018 said Google and Facebook would each pay more than $200,000 to resolve lawsuits over their failure to maintain information about political ads on their platforms since 2013.

Ferguson said in April he launched a second lawsuit against Facebook for allegedly selling Washington state political ads without maintaining legally required information, alleging that its violations were intentional.

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