“I think the county government has, really without too many false starts, risen to the occasion and stuck to our principles,” Page said. “And that’s making decisions based on science, following the advice of public health experts delivering our resources based on need — and doing all that with as much transparency as an urgent situation would allow.”

He said the sports protests were “50% parental frustration and 50% partisan politics in an election year, and probably 50% denial.”

Page chalked up the acrimony in local government to the national political climate. On Tuesday, in the third hour of the council’s weekly marathon videoconference, Councilman Mark Harder, R-7th District, asked Page a question while the county executive’s video was turned off. Page didn’t respond, indicating he wasn’t there, which was Harder’s point.

It was an especially cutting maneuver by Harder, one of the ringleaders of dissent against Page. Just last year, Harder and Page had worked together to ask the prosecuting attorney to kick Stenger out of office for skipping meetings. Page has missed only a few of the council’s weekly meetings since that time.

Page said last week that he had turned his attention on Tuesday to the presidential debate, which he called “a reflection of where we are as a country, how partisan we’ve become and how acrimonious we’ve become.… I expect that we’ll be able to get past the partisan political environment that we’re in and govern responsibly over the next few years.”

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