New Zealand opposition leader Judith Collins has been criticised for calling obesity a “personal choice”, creating a headache for her National party which is struggling in the polls ahead of Saturday’s election.

Collins told radio station Newstalk ZB that “people need to start taking some personal responsibility for their weight” before joking that weight gain was not an epidemic and “wasn’t catching”.

New Zealand is listed by the OECD as the third fattest country in the world, with 31% of Kiwis regarded as obese. Aotearoa sits behind only Mexico (32%) and the United States (38%). Two in three Pasifika (66%) and half of Māori (48%) are obese.

Collins attacked suggestions her views oversimplified a complex issue or were heartless. “Do you know what is heartless? Thinking that someone else can cure these issues. We can all take personal responsibility,” she said.

She criticised parents on the AM Show, saying: “It doesn’t take actually much to get frozen vegetables out of the freezer and pull them out and do something with them. It’s not that hard.”

Mark Mitchell, a former defence minister and expected party leadership contender to Collins should she lose the election, said obesity was “a lot more complex”. “Some obesity is related to medical conditions, even psychological conditions that need treating, so it’s a more complex issue,” he told Newstalk ZB.

Dr Lisa Te Morenga, senior lecturer in Māori health and nutrition at Victoria University, called Collins’ remarks “outrageous and disappointing”.

“Making healthy food choices is really difficult for people when they are constrained by income, lack of access to healthy foods and the environment is full of junk food options,” she said. “And Maori and Pasifika families earn less money, are more likely to live in poverty and in areas not well served by shops.”

Te Morenga

The National Security Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:NSEC) releases preliminary estimates of insured catastrophe losses from Hurricanes Sally and Delta along with updated estimates of catastrophe losses from Hurricane Laura incurred by property and casualty subsidiary National Security Fire & Casualty.

Hurricane Sally

On September 16, 2020, Hurricane Sally made landfall near Gulf Shores, Alabama as a category 2 storm. Hurricane Sally had maximum sustained winds of 105 mph at landfall and was the eighth tropical cyclone, in the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, to impact the continental U.S.

Our pre-tax loss due to Hurricane Sally is expected to be $2,000,000, net of recoveries under our catastrophe aggregate reinsurance. Net of tax, Hurricane Sally will reduce our 2020 earnings by $1,580,000 and will reduce earnings per share by $0.62. The impact of Hurricane Sally will be reflected in our third quarter financial results. To date, we have had approximately 600 claims reported from Hurricane Sally with approximately 90% of total claims from this event incurred by our Alabama policyholders.

Based on our analysis of historical reporting patterns, preliminary post event model estimates and assessment of claims to date, we estimate our ultimate gross losses from Hurricane Sally to be in the range of $3,000,000 to $3,500,000. While we expect to recover $1,000,000 to $1,500,000 under our catastrophe aggregate reinsurance, based on our estimate of gross losses, we do not expect losses from Hurricane Sally to impact our primary catastrophe reinsurance coverage which is triggered once gross losses exceed $4 million from a single catastrophe event. This first layer of catastrophe reinsurance was reinstated for a second event following losses from Hurricane Laura.

Hurricane Laura – Revision to the Range of Estimated Gross Losses

We are revising our estimate of gross losses due to Hurricane Laura. This revision to gross losses (before reinsurance) is

Abbey Lee and Wunmi Mosaku
Abbey Lee and Wunmi Mosaku

Secrets come out, Hippolyta is back, and Tic, Leti, and Montrose are headed back in time. It’s the Tulsa episode, everyone! This bit of history which was lost to most non-Black Americans makes it’s second feature on an HBO series. Once again the survivors are front and center, and the endless trauma of Black people in America remains the theme. Lovecraft Country finally explores in depth how Montrose became the man he is today, in this powerfully moving episode.

Poor baby Diana took the brunt of the hit with the Police Captain’s spell. Her blood turned black, her skin shriveled up, Diana must fight to live long enough for Tic, Leti, and Montrose to find a counter spell. All the adults surrounding her quake with fear, knowing the responsibility for the young girls suffering lays at their feet. As they argue, their secrets inch toward the surface. Leti’s pregnancy, and Montrose’s parietal accuracy remain hidden, but Ruby reveals her intrepid affair with Christina. She promises Christina will perform the spell to heal Diana. Unfortunately, only the Police Captain who cast the spell, can lift the curse. The Captain’s spell rotted Diana. First the spell turned Diana into the physical manifestation of a jigga boo, and then caused her to flesh to rot and fester from the inside out.

Luckily, the hellhounds didn’t kill the Captain in last week’s attack – which Leti spun as a gas explosion. But to call him alive and well would be false. We learned that the police force kidnapped Black citizens, and hacked off whatever limbs an officer needed, attaching the Black body part to the white officer with magic. Christina sentenced William to a thousand deaths by overriding this quick-fix spell. But, that line of deaths must end for

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia’s National Commercial Bank said Sunday it will purchase rival lender Samba Financial Group in a deal valued at $14.8 billion, creating what would become the kingdom’s largest bank.

The bank will control some $223 billion in assets and a market capitalization of $46 billion after the merger wins regulatory approvals and is completed, National Commercial Bank said in a filing on Riyadh’s Tadawul stock market announcing the deal.

The new bank will control a quarter of all banking in the kingdom, it said.

NCB will pay Samba a premium of 3.5% on the closing price of its stock Thursday in the deal, which will see it dissolve into the NCB brand.


The bank’s largest shareholders will be Saudi Arabia’s Private Investment Fund, the Public Pension Agency and the General Organization for Social Insurance, all government entities.

The two banks described the merger as fitting into the kingdom’s Vision 2030 plan, the brainchild of Saudi Arabia’s assertive Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. That plan calls for Saudi Arabia to ween itself off of relying on oil exports while creating new jobs for its millions of young people.

“Saudi Arabia is undergoing a historic transformation with Vision 2030,” NCB chairman Saeed al-Ghamdi said in a statement. “Our ambition is to create a national champion that can facilitate the transformation envisaged under Vision 2030 and create a pioneer for next-generation banking services that nurtures tomorrow’s industry leaders.”

NCB was Saudi Arabia’s first bank to be officially licensed in the kingdom back in 1953, created out of two currency trading houses. Samba grew out of Citibank, which established a presence in the oil-rich kingdom in 1955. The bank became Saudi American Bank following a royal decree in 1980, with Citibank slowly divesting over time until selling

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia’s National Commercial Bank said Sunday it will purchase rival lender Samba Financial Group in a deal valued at $14.8 billion, creating what would become the kingdom’s largest bank.

The bank will control some $223 billion in assets and a market capitalization of $46 billion after the merger wins regulatory approvals and is completed, National Commercial Bank said in a filing on Riyadh’s Tadawul stock market announcing the deal.

The new bank will control a quarter of all banking in the kingdom, it said.

NCB will pay Samba a premium of 3.5% on the closing price of its stock Thursday in the deal, which will see it dissolve into the NCB brand.

The bank’s largest shareholders will be Saudi Arabia’s Private Investment Fund, the Public Pension Agency and the General Organization for Social Insurance, all government entities.

The two banks described the merger as fitting into the kingdom’s Vision 2030 plan, the brainchild of Saudi Arabia’s assertive Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. That plan calls for Saudi Arabia to ween itself off of relying on oil exports while creating new jobs for its millions of young people.

“Saudi Arabia is undergoing a historic transformation with Vision 2030,” NCB chairman Saeed al-Ghamdi said in a statement. “Our ambition is to create a national champion that can facilitate the transformation envisaged under Vision 2030 and create a pioneer for next-generation banking services that nurtures tomorrow’s industry leaders.”

NCB was Saudi Arabia’s first bank to be officially licensed in the kingdom back in 1953, created out of two currency trading houses. Samba grew out of Citibank, which established a presence in the oil-rich kingdom in 1955. The bank became Saudi American Bank following a royal decree in 1980, with Citibank slowly divesting over time until selling