CHICAGO, Oct 12 (Reuters)A Wisconsin factory hailed by President Donald Trump as proof he was reviving U.S. manufacturing did not create enough jobs in 2019 to earn its owner Foxconn Technology Group tax credits, the state said on Monday, the second year it has missed its targets.

In a letter to the Taiwan-based company’s Vice Chairman Jay Lee, Wisconsin’s economic development agency said Foxconn was a long way away from building the large TV screens it had proposed in 2017, when it promised to eventually create 13,000 jobs in the state.

The Apple Inc AAPL.O supplier’s plans for the Mount Pleasant factory are now unclear, the letter from The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) said.

The planned $10 billion, 20-million-square-foot campus was hailed by the White House as the largest investment for a brand new location by a foreign-based company in U.S. history.

But for many the factory has become a symbol of failed promises in Midwestern states like Wisconsin that were key to Trump’s 2016 election and are now closely watched swing states in the Republican’s bid to be re-elected on Nov. 3.

Wisconsin’s Democratic Governor Tony Evers, who inherited a deal from his Republican predecessor to give Foxconn $4 billion in tax breaks and other incentives when he took office in 2019, has sought to renegotiate the state’s contract with the firm.

Foxconn said in a statement it employed more than the minimum 520 full-time workers by the end of the year to get the credit.

“WEDC’s determination of ineligibility during ongoing discussion is a disappointment and a surprise that threatens good faith negotiations,” it said.

WEDC’s review found Foxconn had fewer full-time employees than the minimum, however. It also fell short of its employment goal in 2018.

“Once Foxconn is able to provide more accurate

Recasts throughout with shares, estimates

Oct 8 (Reuters)Domino’s Pizza Inc DPZ.N reported a smaller-than-expected profit on Thursday, as high COVID-19-related costs and staff bonuses offset a jump in demand for pizzas during the coronavirus crisis.

Shares of the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based company, which have risen about 47% this year, were down about 5% before the bell.

The world’s largest pizza chain has thrived during the health crisis as diners staying at home craved more comfort food, but that came at a cost for the company, which spent millions on hiring more staff, bonuses, sick-pay policies and sanitary supplies.

Still, sales at Domino’s U.S. stores open for more than a year rose 17.5% in the third quarter ended Sept. 6, exceeding Wall Street estimates of 13.14%, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

The resumption of sports leagues such as the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League has also boosted demand for pies and chicken wings.

Domino’s has been focusing on tech innovations and has also broadened its menu with additions such as chicken tacos and cheeseburger pizzas in order to keep its customers from switching to rivals McDonald’s MCD.N, Papa John’s PZZA.O and Pizza Hut YUM.N, among others.

The company reported net income of $99.1 million, or $2.49 per share, compared with $86.4 million, or $2.05 per share, a year earlier.

Wall Street analysts had forecast earnings of $2.79 per share.

General and administrative costs rose 9.5% to $91.7 million. The pizza chain spent $108.1 million, a 20.8% rise, on advertising in the United States in the quarter.

Total revenue rose 17.9% to $967.7 million, beating expectations of about $953 million.

(Reporting by Nivedita Balu in Bengaluru; Editing by Aditya Soni and Krishna Chandra Eluri)

(([email protected]; within U.S. +1 646 223 8780; outside U.S.