WARREN, MI – A 37-year-old Michigan man has been charged with the murder of a 6-year-old boy, the boy’s father, and the boy’s father’s girlfriend.

Nicholas Raad Bahri of Bloomfield Hills is accused of the “execution-style killing” of 6-year-old Tai’raz Moore and 28-year-old Isis Rimson at a home on Otis Street in Warren on Oct. 1.

Detroit police also found the body of 32-year-old Tukoyo Moore, Tai’raz’s father, in a torched car around the same time. Bahri is also charged with his murder.

When asked about motive for the murders on Tuesday, Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer simply said “It was all about drugs and money. I’ll leave it at that” but noted that the suspect and victims did know each other.

Macomb County Judge john M. Chmura found probable cause for all 15 counts against Bahri, who has an extensive criminal history, in 37th District Court in Warren on Tuesday.

Bahri is charged with three counts of first-degree homicide, three counts of felony murder, six counts of using a firearm to commit a felony, third degree arson, possessing a firearm as a felon and mutilation of a dead body. Bond was denied and the court will appoint an attorney for Bahri, per his request.

“I don’t know what more a person can do to show they’re a danger to society,” Warren Police Det. Jim Twardesky said at the arraignment.

Bahri was identified as a person of interest last week. Dwyer said the teamwork between his department and the Detroit Police Department was a big reason the suspect was identified, arrested and charged so quickly.

Dwyer has called on federal involvement in prosecuting the case, calling for the death penalty.

“Only monsters, or godless creatures would pull the trigger and execute a 6-year-old child,” Dwyer said on Oct. 9. “When

As President Donald Trump fights to win battleground state Michigan, there is evidence that his tariff policies have hurt his chances. Steel and agriculture are important industries in the state and billions of dollars have been lost due to tariffs.

In March 2018, the Trump administration imposed a 25% tariff on steel in order to protect American steel mills from foreign competition. The tariffs decreased demand for steel from the auto industry and other consumers, hurting steel plants.

Great Lakes Works, one of the largest mills in Michigan, laid off 1,250 workers in June and shut down steelmaking operations. The plant is owned by Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel.

A Reuters analysis reveals that Michigan steelmakers have issued layoff notices to 2,000 workers since the tariffs were implemented. 

The trade war has also hurt Michigan farmers. When Trump announced new tariffs on $60 billion of Chinese imports in May 2019, some farmers spoke out against the move. 

“The noose is getting tighter,” president of the Michigan Agri-Business Association Jim Byrum told the Detroit Free Press that month. “We have lost market opportunities. We’re not shipping soybeans around the world like we normally would. We’re not shipping them to China. China was our biggest soybean consumer, and they’re not moving.”

The Agriculture Department launched the Market Facilitation Program (MFP) to help farmers in 2019. The program distributes payments to farmers negatively impacted by the trade war. 

A report by the Government Accountability Office published in September found Michigan farmers received less on average from the MFP than farmers in other states.

Tariffs Hurt the Heartland notes that Americans have paid over $60 billion in tariffs since the trade war began. In Michigan, more than $2 billion in tariffs have been paid by taxpayers while 1.1 million jobs in the state are supported by

road to hell is paved with good intentions. if they were good intentions

CHICAGO(Reuters) – President Donald Trump promised a new dawn for the struggling U.S. steel industry in 2016, and the lure of new jobs in Midwestern states including Michigan helped him eke out a surprise election win.

Four years later, Great Lakes Works – once among the state’s largest steel plants – has shut down steelmaking operations and put 1,250 workers out of a job. A year before the June layoffs, plant owner United States Steel Corp called off a plan to invest $600 million in upgrades amid deteriorating market conditions.

Trump’s strategy centered on shielding U.S. steel mills from foreign competition with a 25% tariff imposed in March 2018. He also promised to boost steel demand through major investments in roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

But higher steel prices resulting from the tariffs dented demand from the Michigan-based U.S. auto industry and other steel consumers. And the Trump administration has never followed through on an infrastructure plan.

While the tariffs failed to boost overall steel employment, economists say they created higher costs for major steel consumers – killing jobs at companies including Detroit-based automakers General Motors Co and Ford Motor Co. Nationally, steel and aluminum tariffs resulted in at least 75,000 job losses in metal-using industries by the end of last year, according to an analysis by Lydia Cox, a Ph.D. candidate in economics at Harvard University, and Kadee Russ, an economics professor at the University of California, Davis. In all, they estimated, the trade war had caused a net loss of 175,000 U.S. manufacturing jobs by mid-2019.

When U.S. Steel idled Great Lakes Works, which primarily serves the automotive industry, it cited weak demand, lower steel prices and a new corporate strategy to invest in more

President Donald Trump promised a new dawn for the struggling U.S. steel industry in 2016, and the lure of new jobs in Midwestern states including Michigan helped him eke out a surprise election win.

Four years later, Great Lakes Works — once among the state’s largest steel plants — has shut down steelmaking operations and put 1,250 workers out of a job. A year before the June layoffs, plant owner United States Steel Corp called off a plan to invest $600 million in upgrades amid deteriorating market conditions.

Trump’s strategy centered on shielding U.S. steel mills from foreign competition with a 25 percent tariff imposed in March 2018. He also promised to boost steel demand through major investments in roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

But higher steel prices resulting from the tariffs dented demand from the Michigan-based U.S. auto industry and other steel consumers. And the Trump administration has never followed through on an infrastructure plan.

Higher steel prices resulting from Trump’s tariffs have dented demand from the Michigan-based U.S. auto industry and other steel consumers.

Michigan’s heavy reliance on the steel and auto industries puts Trump’s trade policy in sharp focus ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election in this battleground state. Democrats say they aim to recapture the votes of blue-collar workers they lost to Trump four years ago — one key factor in his victory over Hillary Clinton. Trump won Michigan by less than one percent of the statewide vote total. The competition for the votes of often-unionized manufacturing workers —who historically have voted Democratic — will be just as fierce in the battleground states of Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, political analysts say.

Biden leads Trump in Michigan by 8 percentage points, according to a Reuters/Ipsos state opinion poll of likely voters conducted from Sept. 29 – Oct.

The rules right now in Michigan are a bit of a mess.

But no matter how you draw it up, the last batch of businesses proactively closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic can reopen Friday, Oct. 9.

The list of places that can reopen includes theaters, performance venues, amusement parks, arcades, bingo halls, bowling centers, indoor climbing facilities, indoor dance areas, roller rinks, ice rinks, trampoline parks, carnival or amusement rides, water parks and other similar recreational and entertainment facilities.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s Executive Order 2020-183 – issued Sept. 25 – allowed these businesses to reopen Friday. There’s an argument they could have opened as soon as last Friday, however, as Michigan’s executive orders were struck down by a state Supreme Court ruling that day.

Whitmer’s team argued the orders still have merit for three to four weeks, but other experts disagree. While that question remains in limbo, these entertainment venues are now off the hook from either angle.

Friday marks the first day every Michigan industry can open its businesses under Whitmer’s executive orders – albeit with restrictions.

One exception is bars with 70% of their sales coming from alcohol must still be closed inside, per the orders, although they can operate in outdoor spaces.

Moore Theaters has five theaters in southwest Michigan and are among the venues ready to open Friday for the first time since the pandemic began.

“It’s not a free-for-all,” said Scott Moore, vice president of Moore Theaters. “We’re not going back to 100% (capacity). We’re still going to have to still do these things to make sure we get over this pandemic.”

There was no consideration to opening early, since it takes a few weeks to sort out logistics of getting films in, Moore said. The biggest picture debuting this weekend is “The War