Ben Pursell for Blizzard Entertainment

With a 4-2 win over the Seoul Dynasty, the San Francisco Shock have won the Overwatch League Grand Finals in consecutive seasons and cemented themselves as the greatest team in Overwatch history. 

While the sample size is too small for the “dynasty” moniker to be slung around, the Shock’s organizational culture warrants praise. After winning 2019’s championship, partly on the back of play from that season’s MVP, Sinatraa, and his fellow DPS, Architect, San Francisco was without both players in 2020’s playoffs.

As other teams have tried rotating starters, no team has found success doing so quite like the Shock. With Sinatraa leaving to pursue a professional career in Valorant and Architect being transferred to the Hangzhou Spark, both midseason, the organization’s next-man-up mantra paid dividends as midseason acquisition ANS slid into the lineup and helped carry the team to a cool $1.5 million in Grand Finals winnings.

When asked about that ability to rotate players seamlessly, the team’s main support, Moth, offered a simple explanation: “Shock’s always been a team that feels like we don’t really have bench players. Everyone has a role.”

Primarily running ANS and Striker at DPS with Moth and Viol2t on support, head coach Crusty rotated his tank line, complementing ChoiHyoBin with both Smurf and Super during their tightly contested playoff run. Here’s how the final four shook out, followed by the biggest plays and moments from the year’s most important match.

         

Thursday, October 8

Seoul Dynasty 2-3 San Francisco Shock

Philadelphia Fusion 0-3 Shanghai Dragons

         

Friday, October 9

San Francisco Shock 3-2 Shanghai Dragons

Seoul

Adds expected deadline for bids

MILAN, Sept 28 (Reuters)Italy’s top flight soccer league has lost more than 500 million euros ($583 million) in revenues due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, the head of Serie A said on Monday, warning the industry was in dire straits.

To contain COVID-19 contagion, Italy’s government has rejected a proposal to allow more spectators at sporting events, including lifting the current limit of 1,000 spectators at Serie A football matches to fill a quarter of stadium capacity.

“As of now, Serie A is experiencing a shortfall of more than 500 million euros”, Serie A Chief Executive Luigi De Siervo told state television, blaming a lack of matchday revenue and a drop in sponsorship deals.

“The whole system is on the verge of collapse,” he added, calling on the government to consider gradually increasing the cap on football fans at matches.

Matchday revenues account for around 11% of Serie A clubs’ 2.5 billion euro aggregated yearly revenues, whose bulk is made up by broadcasting right sales.

But this source of income is also shrinking because broadcasters around the world respond to lower advertising revenues by cutting spending on media right deals.

In an effort to cushion the impact of the pandemic on debt-laden clubs, Serie A is considering selling a minority stake in a newly created company handling the League’s broadcasting rights for 10 seasons.

Two rival private equity consortia led by CVC Capital Partners and Bain Capital are vying for a 10% stake.

Serie A expects to receive final offers for its media rights by Oct. 2, two sources said on Monday, flagging an extension of a previous Sept. 30 deadline.

The Serie A clubs are expected to meet on Oct. 9 to review the bids, the sources added.

De Siervo