When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save you a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time home buyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time home buyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

 

WHERE’S THE NEAREST FIRE HYDRANT?

A homeowners insurance premium can depend in part on distance to the nearest fire hydrant and fire station, Naughton says. Homes that are on narrow roads or otherwise difficult for firetrucks to access also could be more expensive to insure.

“If they have to cross over a bridge, it’s not only a consideration of can a car go over that bridge, but also can a fire engine,” she says.

Some homes are at such high risk of wildfires and severe weather — hurricanes, tornadoes, windstorms and hail — that private companies won’t insure them. Without insurance, you can’t get a mortgage, so you’d need to turn to state-run risk pools such as Beach and Windstorm Plans or Fair Access to Insurance Requirements Plans, better known as FAIR. These policies typically cost more and cover less than regular homeowners insurance.

Also, many homeowners policies in storm-prone areas have hurricane deductibles that are higher than the normal

Federal investigators say a Coppell man fraudulently applied for dozens of federal stimulus PPP grants and received more than $17 million that he spent buying real estate and luxury cars such as a Bentley and a Corvette.

A coalition of federal agencies charged Dinesh Sah, 55, of Coppell, with applying for $24.8 million in PPP loans for 15 businesses that claimed to have more than 500 employees, but in fact, many of the businesses were registered after the CARES Act was passed and did not have any employees, according to court documents detailing the indictment.

“Mr. Sah exploited this terrible pandemic for personal gain – and he should be held accountable to the American people for that behavior,” said U.S. Attorney Erin Nealy Cox in a statement. “COVID-19 has devastated the finances of hardworking business owners across the nation. PPP funds should be reserved for those who really need them to keep their companies afloat.”

Sah was arrested Sept. 16 and remains in custody, said a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney’s office for the Northern District of Texas.

Sah is one of dozens indicted by government prosecutors for fraudulently applying for forgivable loans through the Payroll Protection Program, the $650 billion slice of the CARES Act designed to help small businesses cover costs for wages, rent and utilities. Among those charged with fraud were a former NFL football player and a former reality television star.

The Small Business Administration's Paycheck Protection Program provided forgivable loans to North Texas restaurants, churches, hotels, nonprofits and many other groups to help them weather the economic fallout of COVID-19 pandemic.

More than 5.2 million loans were approved nationwide. According to the U.S. Treasury Department, Texas businesses were approved for more than $41 billion in grants that were intended to go to businesses with 500 employees or fewer.

The indictment said Sah actually received $17.3 million and used the money on multiple homes, international transfers and a 2020 Bentley convertible, a luxury car that typically sells

When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save a homeowner a bundle.

This could be a particularly important concern for first-time homebuyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time homebuyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared to a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.

A homeowners insurance premium can depend in part on distance to the nearest fire hydrant and fire station, Naughton says. Homes that are on narrow roads or otherwise difficult for fire trucks to access also could be more expensive to insure.

Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey that they were considering moving out of the city because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“If they have to cross over a bridge, it’s not only a consideration of can a car go over that bridge, but also can a fire engine,” she says.

Some homes are at such high risk of wildfires and severe weather — hurricanes, tornadoes, windstorms and hail —that private companies won’t insure them. Without insurance, buyers can’t get a mortgage, so they need to turn to state-run risk pools such as Beach and Windstorm Plans or Fair Access to Insurance Requirements Plans, better known as FAIR. These policies typically cost more and cover less than regular

Dallas-based Invitation Homes, the country’s largest rental home owner, is forming a joint venture with a private equity firm to buy up to $1 billion in single-family homes in Dallas, Seattle, South Florida and a dozen other U.S. markets.

Invitation Homes, which owns 80,000 homes, announced the venture with Rockpoint Group LLC on Wednesday. The companies will initially invest $375 million, with Rockpoint putting $300 million into the buying spree.

“We believe both the fundamentals in our sector and the need for high-quality rental housing in the U.S. are as strong as they have been in our company’s history,” said a statement from Invitation Homes CEO Dallas Tanner.

Single-family home rental companies grew out of the 2008 financial crisis, with Wall Street titans like Blackstone Group Inc. investing heavily in buying up distressed properties. Blackstone launched Invitation Homes but cashed out last year, netting billions in profit.

This year, Invitation Homes narrowed its focus to suburbs close to the city center in 16 markets. It bids on homes as they hit the market, competing with first-time homebuyers and other single-family landlords.

The joint venture expects to deploy as much as $1 billion, including debt, to buy and renovate homes.

Invitation Homes will handle asset and property management for the venture, and will collect management fees in the process, according to the companies.

Invitation Homes executives rang the New York Stock Exchange opening bell on Feb. 1, 2017, to mark the company's IPO. (The Associated Press)

Real estate investors have poured billions into the rental home industry in recent months, betting that more Americans will flee dense city living for the suburbs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s Boston-based Rockpoint’s first move into rental homes.

Rockpoint co-founder Keith Gelb said the firm is “thrilled to be investing alongside Invitation Homes and to be part of the housing solution in America by expanding quality of choice for those seeking homes for lease in

The latest 13F reporting period has come and gone, and Insider Monkey have plowed through 823 13F filings that hedge funds and well-known value investors are required to file by the SEC. The 13F filings show the funds’ and investors’ portfolio positions as of June 30th, when the S&P 500 Index was trading around the 3100 level. Since the end of March, investors decided to bet on the economic recovery and a stock market rebound. S&P 500 Index returned more than 50% since its bottom. In this article you are going to find out whether hedge funds thought LGI Homes Inc (NASDAQ:LGIH) was a good investment heading into the third quarter and how the stock traded in comparison to the top hedge fund picks.

LGI Homes Inc (NASDAQ:LGIH) has seen an increase in support from the world’s most elite money managers of late. LGI Homes Inc (NASDAQ:LGIH) was in 22 hedge funds’ portfolios at the end of June. The all time high for this statistics is 18. This means the bullish number of hedge fund positions in this stock currently sits at its all time high. Our calculations also showed that LGIH isn’t among the 30 most popular stocks among hedge funds (click for Q2 rankings and see the video for a quick look at the top 5 stocks). Video: Watch our video about the top 5 most popular hedge fund stocks.

In the eyes of most market participants, hedge funds are viewed as worthless, outdated investment vehicles of the past. While there are over 8000 funds trading today, Our researchers choose to focus on the moguls of this club, around 850 funds. These investment experts have their hands on most of the smart money’s total capital, and by following their matchless equity investments, Insider Monkey has spotted several investment