FILE PHOTO: Calin Rovinescu, CEO of Air Canada speaks during a panel discussion on Cyber Security at the 2016 International Air Transport Association (IATA) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and World Air Transport Summit in Dublin, Ireland June 3, 2016. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne/File Photo

(Reuters) – Air Canada AC.TO has slashed its price to buy Canadian tour operator Transat A.T. Inc TRZ.TO, with the deal now worth about C$188.7 million ($143.86 million), down from C$720 million, as COVID-19 weighs on travel demand, the companies said in a statement on Saturday.

The country’s largest carrier had secured Transat shareholders’ approval for the deal last year with an C$18.00 a share bid, to bolster its then thriving leisure business.

But with the pandemic grounding flights globally, Air Canada faced shareholder pressure to renegotiate the deal which is still pending approval from European and Canadian regulators, Reuters reported in May.

Montreal-based Air Canada, like many of its global peers, has slashed flights, suspended financial forecasts and sought government aid as the industry deals with its worst slump.

Companies have been cancelling deals amid COVID-19 uncertainty, with aircraft parts suppliers Hexcel Corp HXL.N and Woodward Inc WWD.O abandoning their planned $6.4 billion all-stock merger in April.

Under revised terms of the deal, Air Canada said it will acquire all shares of Transat for C$5 per share, representing a premium of about 30.5% to Transat’s last close on Friday.

“Air Canada intends to complete its acquisition of Transat, at a reduced price and on modified terms,” said Calin Rovinescu, the carrier’s chief executive officer, in a statement.

“Consummating the initial deal at $18.00 was not an option that was viable given the full set of circumstances the Corporation is facing,” Jean-Yves Leblanc, chair of the special committee of the board of Transat said in a statement.

(Reuters) – Air Canada

has slashed its price to buy Canadian tour operator Transat A.T. Inc
, with the deal now worth about C$188.7 million ($143.86 million), down from C$720 million, as COVID-19 weighs on travel demand, the companies said in a statement on Saturday.

The country’s largest carrier had secured Transat shareholders’ approval for the deal last year with an C$18.00 a share bid, to bolster its then thriving leisure business.

But with the pandemic grounding flights globally, Air Canada faced shareholder pressure to renegotiate the deal which is still pending approval from European and Canadian regulators, Reuters reported in May.

Montreal-based Air Canada, like many of its global peers, has slashed flights, suspended financial forecasts and sought government aid as the industry deals with its worst slump.

Companies have been cancelling deals amid COVID-19 uncertainty, with aircraft parts suppliers Hexcel Corp

and Woodward Inc

abandoning their planned $6.4 billion all-stock merger in April.

Under revised terms of the deal, Air Canada said it will acquire all shares of Transat for C$5 per share, representing a premium of about 30.5% to Transat’s last close on Friday.

“Air Canada intends to complete its acquisition of Transat, at a reduced price and on modified terms,” said Calin Rovinescu, the carrier’s chief executive officer, in a statement.

“Consummating the initial deal at $18.00 was not an option that was viable given the full set of circumstances the Corporation is facing,” Jean-Yves Leblanc, chair of the special committee of the board of Transat said in a statement.

As part of the deal, Transat has also secured a new C$250 million short-term loan facility, Transat said.

(Reporting by Bhargav Acharya in Bengaluru and Allison Lampert in Montreal; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s core machinery orders likely fell in August, a Reuters poll found on Friday, reversing the previous month’s gain as the coronavirus pandemic weighed on business investment.

Worsening earnings have discouraged businesses from investing, with the world third-largest economy only just emerging from its worst post war contraction.

Core machinery orders, a highly volatile data series regarded as an indicator of capital spending in the coming six to nine months, likely slipped 1.0% in August from the previous month, the poll of 17 economists showed. The fall would follow a 6.3% gain in July.

From a year earlier, core orders, which exclude those for ships and electrical utilities, are projected to have fallen 15.6% in August following a 16.2% drop in July.

“A rapid deterioration in corporate earnings and uncertainty over the outlook will prompt firms to refrain from carrying out business investment,” said Yoshiki Shinke, chief economist at Dai-ichi Life Research Institute.

“There may be IT-related investment by firms going ahead, but overall business investment is expected to be weak.”

The Cabinet Office will release the machinery orders data at 8:50 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 12 Tokyo time (2350 GMT Oct. 11).

The Bank of Japan’s corporate goods price index (CGPI), which measures the prices companies charge each other for goods and services, likely fell 0.5% in September from a year earlier, the poll found, reflecting weak domestic demand.

(Reporting by Kaori Kaneko; Editing by Sam Holmes)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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The United States on Friday imposed steep new tariffs on nearly $2 billion in aluminum from 18 countries the Commerce Department accuses of dumping into the American market, including Germany, Spain and Brazil.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said China was not on the list but is partially responsible for the flood of aluminum sheet imports that could undermine domestic producers.

“What’s really been happening, actually, is Chinese excess capacity has been dumped into other markets. That, in turn, displaces production which gets dumped here,” Ross said on Fox Business Network.

“It’s a very complicated setup but the net effect is a lot of dumping in the US, and that’s what we’re clamping down on.”

US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said excess aluminum production from China led other countries to dump the product into the US market US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said excess aluminum production from China led other countries to dump the product into the US market Photo: AFP / –

Germany and Brazil face the steepest tariffs of close to 353 percent and 137 percent, respectively. The US imported nearly $287 million of the product from Germany last year, and $97 million from Brazil.

The preliminary decision means the US will immediately begin collecting the tariffs from importers to compensate for the price of aluminum sheeting sold below the cost of production, or helped by unfair subsidies, according to a Commerce Department statement.

The department could overturn the decision in late February, which is also subject to review by the US International Trade Commission. Their final decision is scheduled for April 5, 2021.

Copyright AFP. All rights reserved.

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Democcratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris went after President Trump for not paying enough money in taxes, and questioned who he might owe money to.

“We now know because of great investigative journalism that Donald Trump paid $750 in taxes,” Harris said during Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate. “When I first heard about it, I literally said, ‘You mean $750,000?’ Nope $750.”

Harris was referring to a recent report by The New York Times, who obtained information on the president’s 2016 and 2017 taxes, both of which show he paid a total of $750 in federal taxes each year.

The Times also reported that he paid no federal income taxes for ten of the 15 years prior to winning the presidency in 2016, largely due to the fact that he reported financial loses greater than his income.

KAMALA HARRIS VOWS BIDEN WILL REPEAL TRUMP TAX CUTS ‘ON DAY ONE’

“We now know Donald Trump owes, and is in debt for $400 million, and just so that everyone is clear, when we say in debt – it means you owe money to somebody,” Harris said Wednesday in answer to a question about presidential transparency.

Harris added: “And it’d be really good to know who the president of the United States, the commander-in-chief owes money to, because the American people have a right to know what is influencing the president’s decisions and is he making those decisions on the best interests of the American people….or self-interest?”

Trump has disregarded the report as “fake news” and claimed that his tax returns would be available as soon as the IRS had completed their audit.

Pence, however, highlighted the president’s dismissal of the report and said, “the American people have a president who’s a businessman, a job creator, he’s paid tens of millions of dollars