The crypto industry is known for its dramatic price action, euphoria and bubbles. In the latest sustained fad since the 2017 initial coin offering, or the ICO boom, the decentralized finance niche of the industry now captivates the attention of many participants. One particular asset within this niche, YFI, has pumped to amazing price heights, totaling at least 4,400% gains inside a two-month span. Is this price action warranted, and does the token have actual value?

“YFI’s value lies in its design as a governance token, allowing the community to vote and decide on the direction of the Yearn Finance project,” Jason Lau, the chief operating officer of the OKCoin crypto exchange, told Cointelegraph. “As activity within the project and vaults grow, YFI holders can change strategies, launch new vaults, and potentially even redirect treasury or fees to themselves at a later date.”

“While YFI currently does not offer any returns, there are proposals in the works that could see YFI holders that stake their YFI for governance, [they] would get a portion of the performance fees — and potentially even redirect treasury or fees to themselves at a later date,” Lau added, pointing to a relevant blog post.

Although crypto exchanges see value in YFI, their appraisals of the token may be biased because of the profits they gather by hosting trading for a popular asset. Binance, OKCoin and numerous other exchanges provide YFI trading on their respective exchanges.

Setting the scene

YFI is the token associated with the DeFi yield aggregation platform Yearn.finance. Essentially, the project stands as another opportunity for DeFi participants to shift their money around by borrowing and loaning assets for collateral and earning interest on holdings while also trading various pumping assets.

Between late July and the first half of September 2020, YFI ballooned

  • The management consulting market declined by $30 billion due to decreased client demand during the coronavirus pandemic, but certain areas are still growing. 
  • Experts told Business Insider that technology, healthcare, and strategy consulting remain steady areas of growth for major firms like KPMG, McKinsey, and Boston Consulting Group.
  • Consultants with specializations in digital transformation, corporate turnarounds, and cybersecurity are in higher demand right now. 
  • Here are the practice areas that will expand in response to the coronavirus and how much they pay. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

If you’re looking for a job in management consulting right now, it pays to be in a booming sector. 

The coronavirus pandemic has upended the management-consulting industry. The market for consultants has declined this year to an estimated $132 billion from $160 billion because of decreased client demand, according to research platform Statista. The crisis put a strain on corporate budgets, forcing some to cancel or pause projects with major clients.

But even in the midst of an unstable financial market and a rapidly-spreading virus, there are certain areas within consulting that are growing in demand.

While consultants working in the motor, manufacturing, aerospace, and travel industries are among the most impacted by the health crisis, there are certain areas, such as turnaround and bankruptcy, strategy, and healthcare that are set to grow. 

This means consultants may have to be flexible about the jobs they take on. For example, workers previously handling operations for an airline might be moved to strategy operations for a high-growth client. Stephan Chase, partner and US consulting leader at KPMG, said there’s also been “an explosion of opportunity” in specialized areas such corporate turnarounds, cybersecurity, and government-related work. 

“We tend to flow toward where those opportunities are being generated, and we’ve been pretty good about moving

KEY POINTS

  • Every $1,000 increase in home price pushes 150,000 buyers away: Report 
  • Rental prices have dropped by 0.1% since last month: Report
  • Homebuying is currently led by people with jobs and equity

Rising demand for homes, unprecedented levels of mortgage rates and low supply have pushed home prices out of reach for prospective homebuyers, which could make America a ‘renter nation,’ Grant Cardone, a real estate investor, told Yahoo.

“Homeownership is still dead in this country because the only people that are buying homes right now are people that have equity, great credit, and a job,” Cardone said.

For every $1,000 increase in home price, 150,000 buyers are priced out of a possible home purchase, according to a recent report by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB).

The fall season is known to be good for real estate as home prices fall during this time. Realtor.com, however, suggests that median home prices rose to $350,000 in the week ending Oct. 9, almost matching summer highs. This was 12.9% higher than the previous week.

On the other hand, the rental market is looking more desirable and economic with prices dropping. Data from rental website Zumper suggests that the median rent price for a one-bedroom apartment slid 0.1% from last month.

Cardone said a secure job is a way to secure a home loan. Americans would need a better credit score now than they did before COVID-19 to get a home loan, he told Yahoo.

As the pandemic progressed from early February, the American public, especially renters, have higher rates of unemployment, fewer savings to be used for a down payment, and lower credit scores, Elizabeth Renter, an analyst at Nerdwallet, told Yahoo.

Even though the public is struggling with finances, banks have increased their requirements to give out loans,

Application software firm Atlassian (TEAM) has performed extremely well over the last few years. The stock is up almost 145% over the last two years, while the S&P 500 is up a far more modest 21%. Even when compared to the iShares Expanded Tech-Software Sector ETF (IGV), Atlassian has gained twice as much as the sector.

Atlassian is getting ready to report fiscal first-quarter results in the next few weeks, and the stock is trading near an all-time high ahead of that earnings report. I wasn’t able to find the exact earnings date, as the company didn’t have the event on its Investor Relations page just yet. Several websites, including the Wall Street Journal, have the earnings report coming out on October 15. Based on the fact that Q4 2020 results were released on July 30 and third-quarter results were released on April 30, I am thinking the report will be in a few weeks, not on the 15th.

Regardless of when the report comes out, analysts expect the company to report EPS of $0.27 for the quarter, and that is a penny shy of the $0.28 Atlassian reported in Q1 last year. Revenue is expected to come in at $$440.49 million, and that is an increase of 25.2% compared to last year.

Over the last three years, the company has seen earnings grow by 52% per year, while revenue has grown by 38% per year. The fourth-quarter results showed earnings growth of 25% and revenue growth of 29%. Analysts expect the earnings growth to slow down in 2021 with an estimated growth rate of 3%. Revenue is expected to grow by 18.8%.

In addition to the tremendous earnings and revenue growth, Atlassian has strong management efficiency measurements. The return on equity is extremely high at 50.6%, and the

For the second month, New Jersey residents are complaining of shockingly high utility bills after months of estimated meter readings, according to dozens of NJ.com readers and complaints to the Board of Public Utilities.

Between Aug. 24 and Sept 24, the Board of Public Utilities received more than 229 complaints regarding high utility bills for PSE&G, 36 for JCP&L, 26 for ACE and nine for Rockland, spokesman Peter Peretzman said in a statement to NJ Advance Media.

“My bill, it’s over $500,” said Kevin Davitt of Glen Rock. “We have a window unit so it eats up the electricity in the summer, but this was just unusually high.”

And Hoboken resident Kailey Elfstrum said her bill jumped from $106 to $523. While she expected her bill to go up when she moved from her one-bedroom apartment across the street to her two-bedroom apartment, she was dismayed at the hundreds more she suddenly owed.

Along with dozens of other confused customers, they reached out to PSE&G customer services, which has seen an increase in customers calling about skyrocketing bills due to estimated meter readings.

The utility giant explained that one of Gov. Phil Murphy’s executive orders enacted during the height of the coronavirus pandemic barred utility workers from entering people’s homes. That meant the company had to estimate meter readings beginning in March and through the summer, said Fred Daum, Executive Director of Customer Operations.

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Electricity usage history and average monthly temperature are two big factors that come into play with estimating usage, he said in an interview.

For example, if a customer’s August bill was estimated, the company looks at average temperature this year — 77 degrees — compared to last year’s 76 degrees. The customer’s usage should be very