There’s a peculiar sound coming from inside the magenta building at 623 Valencia St.

The muffled crinkling of plastic sanitary gloves accompanies customers as they hurriedly sift through secondhand clothing racks, unusually tidy bookshelves and rows of assorted knick-knacks. Laughter rings out from another corner of the shop, where a group of masked teenage girls unfurl posters to reveal faded images of Gumby and Vincent Van Gogh. The synth pop drawl of Thomas Dolby’s “She Blinded Me with Science” echoes over the speakers as more people line up on the sidewalk outside of Community Thrift, where in-store shopping has resumed for the first time in months.
 
The steel garage door typically intended for moving large donations has been lifted to safely allow customers through. In its place is a seated employee shielded by a clear, glass divider. One by one, she provides each guest with a pump of hand sanitizer, followed by a pair of disposable gloves, and gestures them toward a pile of multicolored shopping baskets, sending them on their way.

The bustle is a relief for this rummager’s paradise, and though business is unusual, the oldest independent thrift store left in San Francisco is doing what it can to survive.

“Things are definitely picking up, but we’re not doing business like we used to,” interim executive director Brian Stump tells me over the phone.

Community Thrift, in the Mission District of San Francisco, opened in 1982 and supports over 200 Bay Area charities.

Community Thrift, in the Mission District of San Francisco, opened in 1982 and supports over 200 Bay Area charities.

Blair Heagerty / SFGATE

The Mission District was once considered a thrifter’s haven, peppered with retro boutiques and resale shops. But circumstances proved challenging for small businesses, even prior to the pandemic. As rents soared, independent retailers simply couldn’t keep up. Secondhand shops in particular have disappeared from the neighborhood in rapid-fire succession: Clothes Contact,

You need to recognize that your desire to show people how smart you are, or to impress people with your wealth, or prove how quickly you can make money, which causes you to do insufficient research, can lead you to these bad decisions.

Accept that you are flawed, he says, and you will have a chance of doing the right thing. “Do not aim to be coldly rational when making financial decisions,” he says. “Aim to be pretty reasonable. Reasonable is more realistic and you have a better chance of sticking with it for the long run.”

Mr. Housel offers two examples of reasonableness: Try to defer gratification, recognizing that wealth is created by not spending today so that you have more options in the future. And try to maintain a long horizon.

“Time is the most powerful force in investing,” he says. “It makes little things grow big and big mistakes fade away.”

As much as I like this book, it’s not perfect.

For example, Mr. Housel writes, “How you behave is more important than what you know.” While it’s certainly true that your behavior can undermine the best financial plans, it’s also true that if you know nothing about finance and make your own investment decisions anyway, you are leaving things up to chance.

I have the same problem with his claim that “an investor can be wrong half the time, and still make a fortune.” In one sense, that’s true. Here’s an interpretation that puts the comment in the best light. Say you buy 10 individual stocks that are all priced at $20 a share. If four rise 10 percent over the year, five fall 10 percent, and one increases by a factor of 20, you are a big winner.

But taking Mr. Housel’s comment literally could

Black people who have a strong sense of psychological well-being may have better heart health, a new study indicates.

It suggests that feelings of optimism and a sense of purpose and control — hallmarks of psychosocial resilience — are more important to heart health than where people live, researchers said.

Lead researcher Tené Lewis, an associate professor at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, noted that differences in heart health between Black and White Americans have been documented for decades. But individual factors affecting Black Americans have not been well understood.

“Almost everything we know about Black Americans and their health focuses on deficits, yet we really need to begin to identify strengths,” she said. “Understanding which strengths matter most for Black Americans — and under which contexts — will allow us to develop the most appropriate and applicable public health interventions for this group.”

For the study, the researchers recruited nearly 400 Black volunteers between the ages of 30 and 70. They investigated whether the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 metrics were linked to better heart health among them. The seven measures include smoking, physical activity, diet, weight, blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure.

Participants also completed standard questionnaires gauging their psychosocial health.

This information was then compared with neighborhood data on heart disease and stroke and death rates.

In neighborhoods with high rates of heart disease and stroke, Black adults with higher psychosocial resilience had a 12.5% lower risk of heart disease than those who were less resilient, the researchers found.
The findings were published Oct. 7 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“We assumed that being both high on psychosocial resilience and living in a resilient neighborhood would be the most beneficial for cardiovascular health, yet what we found was that

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Black people who have a strong sense of psychological well-being may have better heart health, a new study indicates.

It suggests that feelings of optimism and a sense of purpose and control — hallmarks of psychosocial resilience — are more important to heart health than where people live, researchers said.

Lead researcher Tené Lewis, an associate professor at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, noted that differences in heart health between Black and white Americans have been documented for decades. But individual factors affecting Black Americans have not been well understood.

“Almost everything we know about Black Americans and their health focuses on deficits, yet we really need to begin to identify strengths,” she said. “Understanding which strengths matter most for Black Americans — and under which contexts — will allow us to develop the most appropriate and applicable public health interventions for this group.”

For the study, the researchers recruited nearly 400 Black volunteers between the ages of 30 and 70. They investigated whether the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 metrics were linked to better heart health among them. The seven measures include smoking, physical activity, diet, weight, blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure.

Participants also completed standard questionnaires gauging their psychosocial health.

This information was then compared with neighborhood data on heart disease and stroke and death rates.

In neighborhoods with high rates of heart disease and stroke, Black adults with higher psychosocial resilience had a 12.5% lower risk of heart disease than those who were less resilient, the researchers found.

The findings were published Oct. 7 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“We assumed that being both high on psychosocial resilience and living in a resilient neighborhood

KEY POINTS

  • Bristol Myers’ tender price represents a 61-percent premium on MyoKardia shares
  • The transaction is expected to close during the fourth quarter of 2020
  • An estimated 160,000 to 200,000 people have been diagnosed with symptomatic obstructive HCM in the U.S. and EU

Bristol Myers Squibb (BMY) said on Monday it signed a definitive agreement to acquire MyoKardia Inc. (MYOK) in a deal valued at $13.1 billion, or $225 per share in cash.

MyoKardia closed at $139.60 per share on Friday, meaning Bristol Myers’ tender price represents a 61% premium. The transaction is expected to close during the fourth quarter of 2020.

MyoKardia is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the treatment of serious cardiovascular diseases.

Bristol Myers Squibb said the transaction is expected to be “minimally dilutive” to its non-GAAP earnings per share in 2021 and 2022 and “accretive” beginning in 2023.

Bristol Myers Squibb expects to finance the deal through a combination of cash and debt.

As a result of the merger, Bristol Myers Squibb will obtain mavacamten, a potential treatment for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a chronic heart disease with high morbidity. A New Drug Application for mavacamten for the treatment of symptomatic obstructive HCM is expected to be submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the first quarter of 2021.

There are an estimated 160,000 to 200,000 people diagnosed with symptomatic obstructive HCM in the U.S. and EU, with no existing treatment options outside of limited symptomatic relief.

Bristol Myers Squibb also said it expects to “explore the full potential” of mavacamten in additional indications, including non-obstructive HCM, and to develop MyoKardia’s “promising pipeline” of novel compounds, including two clinical-stage therapeutics: danicamtiv (formerly called MYK-491) and MYK-224.

Mavacamten could generate annual sales of more than $1.5 billion worldwide by 2025, BMO Capital Markets