FILE PHOTO: Judge Amy Coney Barrett meets with United States Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO.), not pictured, at the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., October 1, 2020. Demetrius Freeman/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s pick for a U.S. Supreme Court vacancy, said she will rule based on the law, not her personal views, in prepared remarks issued on Sunday ahead of her Senate confirmation hearing this week.

Barrett, a conservative appeals court judge, said that in her current job she has “done my utmost to reach the result required by the law, whatever my own preferences might be.”

A devout Catholic who has a record of opposing abortion rights, Barrett is likely to be probed by Senate Democrats on that issue in particular. If Barrett is confirmed to the position by the Republican-controlled Senate, the court would have a 6-3 conservative majority. Conservative activists hope the court will overturn the 1973 ruling, Roe v. Wade, that legalized abortion nationwide.

Trump nominated Barrett to replace liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last month.

Barrett said in the statement that it will be an “honor of a lifetime” to serve alongside the current eight justices and explained how she approaches cases.

“When I write an opinion resolving a case, I read every word from the perspective of the losing party. I ask myself how would I view the decision if one of my children was the party I was ruling against,” she wrote.

Barrett, 48, who has seven children, would be the fifth woman to serve on the court. Before Trump appointed her to the Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Barrett was a professor at Notre Dame Law School in Indiana.

Reporting by Steve Holland

In the past 72 hours, Yearnfinance (YFI) surged by 58% after dropping to as low as $12,260 at a few exchanges. 

Three factors that may have catalyzed the sharp rebound are: YFI had become deeply oversold, lead developer Andre Cronje’s deep commitment to the project and the ever expanding use cases for YFI within a large ecosystem.

YFI was deeply oversold

Over the past month DeFi tokens endured a brutal correction which saw the value of many DeFi tokens drop by 40%-70%. The sell-off appears to be primarily led by corrections in Bitcoin (BTC) and Ether (ETH) but now that BTC has turned $11K to support, traders are watching to see if YFI and other tokens will continue to rise higher.

YFI/USDT daily chart. Source: TradingView.com

As Cointelegraph reported, the strong fundamentals of the top DeFi projects was a hint that the market was oversold.

At the time data showed that revenues of most DeFi protocols were actually increasing while token prices fell sharply, indicating that they are likely below fair value.

Revenue change versus token price change of major DeFi networks. Source: Twitter.com

Yearn.finance, as an example, has been on the cusp of releasing the second version of its vaults.

Typically, major product launches and updates would cause the underlying token to rise but the overall weakness in the DeFi market caused YFI price to drop lower throughout September and October.

The total value locked across Yearn.finance products is also hovering above $900 million. This indicates that almost $1 billion worth of capital has been deployed across the Yearn.finance platform.

Total value locked in Yearn.finance. Source: Stats.finance

Andre Cronje assures the community he is not leaving

In the past week there have been rumors that lead developer, Andre Cronje, is leaving the Yearn.finance project after hackers managed to siphon

BEIJING (AP) — Global stock markets and Wall Street futures rose Friday after President Donald Trump said talks had resumed on an aid package for the struggling U.S. economy.



A man walks past an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 index at a securities firm in the rain in Tokyo Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. Asian stock markets followed Wall Street higher on Friday on hopes Washington will provide more aid to the struggling U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)


© Provided by Associated Press
A man walks past an electronic stock board showing Japan’s Nikkei 225 index at a securities firm in the rain in Tokyo Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. Asian stock markets followed Wall Street higher on Friday on hopes Washington will provide more aid to the struggling U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

London and Frankfurt opened higher. Shanghai and Sydney advanced. Tokyo and Hong Kong declined.

Wall Street gained Thursday after President Donald Trump, who earlier called off negotiations with legislative leaders, said “very productive” talks had begun. Separately, a report indicated the near-record pace of U.S. job losses might be slowing.

Stock prices have been volatile since mid-September as investors swing between optimism about possible development of a coronavirus vaccine and unease that markets recovered too fast and shares are too expensive.

“When the world’s financial markets are at the mercy of the randomness emanating from the White House, it is hardly surprising that investors elsewhere would prefer to wait on the side-lines,” said Jeffrey Halley of Oanda in a report. “Unfortunately, things are unlikely to settle down over the next few weeks.”

In early trading, London’s FTSE 100 gained 0.3% to 5,998.38 and the DAX in Frankfurt added under 0.1% to 13,051.30. The CAC 40 in Paris was up 0.5% at 4,935.11.

On Wall Street, futures for the benchmark S&P 500 index and Dow Jones Industrial Averages were up 0.4%.

In Asia, the Shanghai Composite Index, resuming trading after a weeklong holiday, rose 1.7% to 3,272.08. The Nikkei 225 in Tokyo lost 0.1% to 23,619.69 and the Hang Seng in Hong Kong shed XXX.

Sydney’s S&P-ASX

BEIJING (AP) — Asian stock markets followed Wall Street higher on Friday on hopes Washington will provide more aid to the struggling U.S. economy.

Benchmarks in Shanghai, Hong Kong, South Korea and Sydney advanced. Tokyo was off 0.1%.

Wall Street gained Thursday after President Donald Trump suggested he might be reversing his decision to halt talks on economic aid. Separately, a report indicated the near-record pace of U.S. job losses might be slowing.

Stock prices have been volatile since mid-September as investors swing between optimism about possible development of a coronavirus vaccine and unease that markets recovered too fast and shares are too expensive.

“The on-and-off nature of the fiscal stimulus discussion in the U.S. hardly inspires lasting confidence,” said Mizuho Bank in a report. “Uncertainty around the presidential election on 3 November will likely persist not only through to polling day but possibly after.”

The Shanghai Composite Index, resuming trading after a weeklong holiday, rose 1.9% to 3,278.83. The Nikkei 225 in Tokyo shed 0.3% to 23,574.39 while the Hang Seng in Hong Kong gained less than 0.1% to 24,216.26.

Sydney’s S&P-ASX 200 gained 0.3% to 6,122.00 and India’s Sensex opened 0.3% higher at 40,312.42. New Zealand advanced while Singapore, Bangkok and Jakarta declined.

Trump said in a TV interview that “very productive” talks had begun on more stimulus after supplemental unemployment benefits that supported consumer spending, the engine of the U.S. economy, expired.

That helped to fuel optimism that Republicans and Democrats will deliver another aid package after weeks of uncertainty.

Wall Street’s benchmark S&P 500 index rose 0.8% to 3,446.83. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.4% to 28,425.51. The Nasdaq composite picked up 0.5% to 11,420.98.

Banks, technology and communication companies accounted for much of the gains.

Energy stocks rose as the price of U.S. crude

JCPenney may be about to emerge from its chapter 11 bankruptcy and get back to the business of retailing. Then again, maybe it won’t.

In what is turning into certainly one of the most convoluted and complicated bankruptcy cases in recent retail history, what had seemed to be a done deal for two shopping mall real estate companies and a group of private equity investors to buy the company has apparently hit a speed bump. How big that bump is and how much damage it will do to the underside of this deal remains to be seen.

The latest wrinkle came earlier this week when a group of smaller lenders to the retailer led by Aurelius Capital Management said it didn’t like the original deal, saying it would channel too much money to that group and — on the flip side — not enough to itself and others cut out of the equity deal.

Mall operators Simon Property Group and Brookfield Property Partners along with some boldface lenders including H/2 and KKR had reached what seemed to be a final deal to buy Penney last month. The shopping center companies would get most of the retail real estate, much of which was located in malls they owned, giving them an anchor tenant they needed to populate their properties. The other investors would get additional real estate, the rights to provide funding for the new entity and other assorted financial considerations.

Aurelius said the arrangement was unfair and that its group, which controls about 16% of Penney’s loans according to published reports, was entitled to a bigger