Women in the spotlight who willingly share their experiences with weight loss are often unfairly critiqued for feeding into a narrative that “thin is better,” while others who embrace their curves are labeled “unhealthy.”

Seriously, people. Let’s stop trying to police women’s bodies.

Rebel Wilson dubbed 2020 her “Year of Health” back in January, and she’s been proudly posting about her efforts ever since.
I wrote about Wilson celebrating her fit physique this week and drew immediate ire from some who felt the coverage suggested there is something wrong with being bigger.

While I understand the concerns, nuance, apparently, doesn’t come easy to the internet.

Passing judgment on stars who lose weight (or gain weight) is an unfortunate pastime we can’t seem to quit. Here are just a few celebs who have been through it.

Adele: Her recent physical transformation sparked claps, eyerolls and complaints that she is now “too thin.”

The criticism when she first found fame was that she was too big. Either way, she’s beautiful, talented and an artist who is easy to admire.
Melissa McCarthy: The former “Gilmore Girls” star used her experience being zaftig to launch a plus-size clothing line years ago. I remember when she first started shedding pounds, someone on Twitter questioned if she’d still be as funny as a thinner woman. Ridiculous.

Lizzo: The singer fully embraces her fullness, and that has led many people to sign her up as the poster woman for big-girl acceptance.

But hailing Lizzo just for her body positivity ignores the reality that she would be a success at any size.

Zac Efron: Women aren’t the only ones who have to deal with comments about their bodies.

To some, the actor is looking slightly different on his Netflix travel series, “Down to Earth with

CHICAGO (CBS) — Chicago restaurants will soon be able to serve more people indoors, and bars that don’t serve food will soon be able to resume service inside, under loosened COVID-19 restrictions announced by Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Monday.

The city also is easing restrictions for health and fitness clubs, and for personal services.

“Being able to open further today is just one small step that we’re taking based on what we’re seeing in the data,” Lightfoot said. “It also means that difficult decisions and sacrifices that we’ve all had to make are moving us slowly but surely forward.”

The mayor said the move comes after the city has seen improving COVID-19 data over the past month, including lower rates of infection and fewer emergency room visits.

“It was because of the citywide cooperation and collaboration that Chicago never saw a huge surge in cases once we started to gently reopen,” Lightfoot said. “All the modeling predicted that we would see a surge. The question was only how large, and luckily because of all the hard work and sacrifice of so many, including individual residents, that fate didn’t come to us.”

The new rules will go into effect on Thursday, when indoor capacity at restaurants will be increased from 25% to 40%, with a maximum of 50 people per room and six people per table.

Bars that serve alcohol but not food will be limited to 25% capacity indoors, or a maximum of 50 people, whichever is lower. Customers can stay no longer than two hours, and cannot order at the bar, only at tables. Bars that don’t serve food themselves also must partner with a restaurant or other establishment to make food available to customers at all times through delivery services.