Economical Insurance has selected Docebo (TSX: DCBO), a leading artificial intelligence (AI)-powered learning platform, to enhance and personalize learning experiences for employees and broker partners. Docebo was chosen to help Economical modernize traditional insurance company training through cutting-edge learning experience technology.

Economical Insurance is a rapidly evolving Canadian insurer. After nearly 150 years in business, they are now on the path to becoming a public company. Docebo offers Economical a modern, learner-centric platform to support their rapid growth and learning culture. Economical Insurance has been transforming its business model to keep pace with evolving customer expectations.

“This is such a dynamic time for Economical on so many fronts, and our ability to attract and develop some of the best talent in our industry is a top priority,” said Brigid Pelino, SVP and Chief Human Resources Officer, Economical Insurance. “With Docebo, we continue our focus on operational efficiency knowing that our new, innovative learning infrastructure will support our employees and valued broker partners with better access to timely information and critical skills to meet their development needs and further our business integrity and capabilities.”

“We are honoured to have been selected by Economical Insurance to support the transformation of their business model through their learners’ experience,” said Alessio Artuffo, CRO, Docebo. “By providing a modern, learner-centric platform, Economical Insurance has innovation and personalization at the forefront of their learning experience.”

About Docebo

Docebo is redefining the way enterprises learn by applying new technologies to the traditional corporate learning management system market. Docebo provides an easy-to-use, highly configurable learning platform with the end-to-end capabilities designed to make customers, partners, and employees love their learning experience.

About Economical Insurance

Economical Mutual Insurance Company (“Economical” or “Economical Insurance”, which includes its subsidiaries where the context so requires) is a leading property and

Employee engagement and morale have taken a beating in the pandemic. As companies scramble to adapt to new remote workplace realities, leaders are stepping up their efforts to provide mentorship and career development opportunities, and for good reason.

According to a new study from online scheduling platform Doodle, 49 percent of employees don’t feel like they’re getting enough training, coaching, or mentoring to advance their careers. On top of that, 50 percent of employees said their careers have stalled or even regressed.

Now with the pandemic–and all the uncertainty and stress that it’s brought with it–feelings of self-doubt have grown stronger and become louder in employees’ minds.

For some employees, being recognized for doing a job well or for taking on leadership qualities (regardless of their title) can do wonders for their confidence and self-esteem. So, constant recognition and growth can help self-doubting employees regain their confidence, take more ownership, and actualize their career goals.

That said, organizations need to bring mentorship and career development to the forefront of their corporate strategy, mission, values, and culture.

Career development is not a one-way street

The Doodle study highlights a huge disparity between what employees need to grow professionally and what their employers are providing. On the one hand, 32 percent of employees want clear direction on their roles and responsibilities and 15 percent want guidance and support for their career-development goals. If you think about these stats, that’s 47 percent who want their bosses to play an active role in their career growth.

Employees understand that career growth is not a one-way street. To meet career goals, managers must build rapport with their people. That includes being able to have honest one-on-one conversations about what a career path looks like for your employee at the company. These conversations can only happen

More coverage for virtual doctors’ visits. Expanded mental health benefits. Access to on-site health clinics.



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As employees sign up for job-based coverage for 2021, they’ll find the coronavirus pandemic has changed some of the benefits that their companies are providing, experts said.

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And they’ll also see their premiums and out-of-pocket costs increase about 5%, which is more than wages and inflation have been rising, according to the Business Group on Health, which surveys large employers.

This bump comes on top of a 4% increase in premiums this year, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s annual employer health benefits survey. In 2020, the average annual premiums hit nearly $7,500 for single coverage and $21,500 for family coverage. Deductibles stayed roughly the same at about $1,650 for a single person.

One of the biggest changes for 2021 will be a growth in the number and types of virtual care options, said Steve Wojcik, the group’s vice president of public policy. Employers had long offered telehealth, but few of their staffers actually used it.

The pandemic changed all that. Utilization soared as Americans sought medical care from the safety of their homes.

Some 53% of large employers will offer more virtual care options next year, the group found. And they are extending the services to weight management, prenatal care and management of chronic diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Coronavirus, as well as the accompanying economic upheaval, has also greatly affected many Americans’ mental health. Companies plan to bolster their support and make employees more aware of the offerings available to them, said Mark Hope, senior director at Willis Towers Watson.

Some 45% of large employers are planning to work with their insurers to expand mental health provider networks, according to the Business Group on Health report.

Some 91%

Lowe’s Companies Inc. LOW has been recognizing the efforts of its frontline workers, who have worked tirelessly during the pandemic, through special payments and bonuses. In April, the company scaled up the payment for full-time, part-time and seasonal associates by $2 per hour. Taking this further, it has now committed to pay an additional $100 million of discretionary bonuses to its frontline hourly workers across U.S. stores, distribution centers and store support centers.

The company plans to pay $300 to all full-time hourly associates and $150 for the part-time and seasonal associates. The bonus will be distributed to all associates in the United States on Oct 16. This will match the payments of all hourly associates in March, May, July and August.

So far amid the pandemic, the company has provided more than $675 million in incremental financial support to associates. With the payment of the aforementioned additional bonus, its total commitment for associates and communities during the pandemic reaches more than $775 million.

Additionally, in a separate release, Lowe’s Canada revealed plans to reward frontline workers with additional discretionary bonuses. The company stated that all eligible full-time and part-time associates at Lowe’s, RONA or Reno-Depot corporate stores, contact centers, and supply-chain facilities in Canada will receive the aforementioned bonuses in the latter half of October. This is incremental to the discretionary bonus paid in March and August as well as the special premium wage of $2 per hour paid in April, May, June and July.

Apart from this, Lowe’s Canada revealed that it plans to hire more than 650 people for various positions in Quebec, including more than 625 full-time and part-time regular jobs at RONA and Reno-Depot corporate stores, and about 30 positions at the Boucherville distribution center. The positions offered are that of Sales Specialists, Lumber Yard



a man wearing a suit and tie: Ed Bastian


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Ed Bastian

The airline hasn’t had the massive layoffs of the other major airlines in part because it gave employees a choice.

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It’s a rough time to be an airline.

Look no further than the decisions by United and American to impose massive layoffs and furloughs that began on October 1. That was the date airlines had agreed to when they received assistance from the U.S. government. Between them, those two companies say as many as 35,000 employees may lose their jobs, at least in the short term.

While the airline industry has pushed for a second round of aid to preserve jobs through next March, it’s unclear whether that will happen. The President tweeted that he believes Congress should provide $25 billion for airlines despite previously indicating that there would be no further pandemic-related assistance package until after the election.

Of all the businesses affected by the pandemic, I think it’s fair to say that airlines have faced some of the greatest challenges. Not only are people simply not traveling as much (or at all), but when they do, airlines face the enormous responsibility of keeping them safe.

That combination of decreased demand and increased safety expenses makes it very hard for airlines to make money. As the entire industry has canceled flights and reduced overall capacity, it may seem logical that the quickest way to reduce expenses is to furlough employees.

Delta, however, is taking a different approach. It said in September that it will avoid furloughing flight attendants, and has delayed any pilot reductions until at least November 1. That is largely the result of the company’s