Jared Kushner
Jared Kushner

Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner participates in a press briefing at the White House on September 4, 2020 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A new documentary shining a light on White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner’s handling of the COVID-19 is raising questions about the credibility of his Supply Chain Task Force’s pandemic response over the last several months. 

In the forthcoming documentary titled, “Totally Under Control,” Max Kennedy, Jr., also the 27-year-old grandson of Robert F. Kennedy, reflected on his time as a volunteer working for President Donald Trump’s administration in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

“My old boss called me and said he heard Kushner’s task force needed younger volunteers who had general skills and were willing to work seven days a week for no money,” Kennedy said.

Although Kennedy admitted that he was apprehensive about working for the Trump administration, he took the position. When he arrived at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in Washington, D.C., he and others were led to an underground conference room with no windows. TVs blaring news reports from Fox News covered the walls as representatives of FEMA and the military entered to brief the new staff about their positions. 

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According to Kennedy, volunteers were told that they needed to acquire “stuff” for the government. He soon learned the “stuff” they were referring to was actually personal protective equipment (PPE). After government officials left, Kennedy and other volunteers slowly began to better understand what was transpiring.

“We thought we’d be auxiliary support for an existing procurement team,” Kennedy said in the documentary. “Instead, we were the



Jared Kushner, Kellyanne Conway standing next to a person in a suit and tie: White House senior advisor Jared Kushner and counselor Kellyanne Conway on April 30. AP Photo/Evan Vucci


© AP Photo/Evan Vucci
White House senior advisor Jared Kushner and counselor Kellyanne Conway on April 30. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

  • For several weeks in March and April, Max Kennedy Jr., then 26, served on Jared Kushner’s White House COVID-19 Supply Chain Task Force.
  • Kennedy, who is Robert F. Kennedy’s grandson, quit the task force in April. Soon after, he wrote an anonymous whistleblower complaint to Congress accusing the task force of corruption and ineptitude.
  • According to Kennedy, most members of the task force were young, inexperienced volunteers “cold emailing” Chinese factories from their personal email accounts.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Max Kennedy Jr. volunteered to help out on Jared Kushner’s White House COVID-19 Supply Chain Task Force, he thought he’d be helping out senior staff with rote tasks like data entry.

“My old boss called me and said he heard Kushner’s task force needed younger volunteers who had general skills and were willing to work seven days a week for no money,” Kennedy, now 27, said in the forthcoming documentary about the Trump team’s coronavirus response, “Totally Under Control.” The film, which was made in secret over the past five months, is slated for on-demand release on October 13.



Official poster for "Totally Under Control." Courtesy of Neon


© Courtesy of Neon
Official poster for “Totally Under Control.” Courtesy of Neon

Despite his “apprehension” about working for the Trump administration, Kennedy volunteered because he felt like it was the right thing to do, he said.

So Kennedy traveled to Washington, DC, and showed up at the headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Once there, he said volunteers were led to Conference Room A, a windowless underground meeting space. TVs covered the walls, all blaring Fox News.

After they sat down, Kennedy said representatives from FEMA and the military came in and gave them a

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian casino billionaire James Packer on Tuesday acknowledged sending threatening emails in 2015 to an unnamed person with whom he was working on taking Crown Resorts Ltd

private while a director at the company he created.

During questioning by a government inquiry, Packer blamed his “medical state” for the threats which he agreed were “shameful” and “disgraceful”. Packer, who confirmed on Tuesday that he has bipolar disorder after revealing previously he had mental health problems, said he should have told shareholders about his personal issues instead of keeping them secret.

“I think my medical state is what it reflected most on,” Packer said of the emails to the person. Packer, who quit the Crown board weeks later without disclosing medical issues, no longer works at the company but retains 37% of Crown, a stake worth A$2.2 billion ($1.57 billion).

One of Australia’s wealthiest people, Packer shuns public attention beyond staged photo opportunities or prepared statements. Packer testified via videolink in a jacket and tie from an undisclosed location, reported by Australian media to be on board a yacht in the South Pacific.

The government inquiry comes as the New South Wales state casino regulator considers whether Crown should be allowed to proceed with plans to run a 75-floor, A$2.2 billion ($1.6 billion) casino tower in Sydney, just months before its scheduled opening.

The risk of the company losing its licence grew last year following media reports, denied by the company, that Crown hired tour operators linked to organised crime to bring wealthy foreign gamblers, largely from China.

Packer denied knowing that Crown staff set up informal offices in residential locations in Guangzhou, China, where advertising gambling is illegal, to avoid detection. In 2016, 16 Crown staff were jailed in China for violating anti-gambling laws. [D-REUTERSNEWS-T004/Ie4b85a305a2b11e79b7692983d739d5a]

“I believe