BERLIN (Reuters) – The latest economic data provide hope that Germany’s economy can return to pre-crisis levels in early 2022, Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said on Tuesday.



a group of police officers riding on the back of a car: FILE PHOTO: VW re-starts Europe's largest car factory after coronavirus shutdown


© Reuters/POOL New
FILE PHOTO: VW re-starts Europe’s largest car factory after coronavirus shutdown

Germany’s rising level of government debt is not a problem because the country can tackle the situation with “good growth”, Scholz told TV station CNBC in an interview.

Scholz rejected concerns that state aid was artificially keeping alive companies that were in financial troubles in the wake of the crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic.



Olaf Scholz wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: German Finance Minister Scholz and Justice Minister Lambrecht hold news conference in Berlin


© Reuters/HANNIBAL HANSCHKE
German Finance Minister Scholz and Justice Minister Lambrecht hold news conference in Berlin

Germany’s government has taken steps such as allowing firms to delay bankruptcy filings until the end of the year, extended from an original deadline of end-September.

Helped by these measures, the number of firms declaring insolvency in Germany fell 6% in the first half of 2020 compared with the year-earlier period.

Critics say suspending insolvencies delays but does not prevent the collapse of “zombie companies” that are artificially kept afloat.

Firms are making necessary decisions and adjustments despite the crisis, Scholz said. For instance, many companies are cutting staff at the moment instead of making use of state aid that would allow them to cut workers’ hours, he said.

“The debate about zombie companies is nonsense,” Scholz said.

(Reporting by Christian Kraemer, writing by Kirsti Knolle, editing by Maria Sheahan)

Continue Reading

Source Article

CRISPR therapeutics inc, logo 2020

Graphic Source: CRISPR Therapeutics, Inc.

Introduction: What is CRISPR Therapeutics, Inc.?

CRISPR Therapeutics (NASDAQ:CRSP) is a gene-editing company focused on the development and versatile application of CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics, a special brand of therapeutics used for precision genome editing by applying a viral defense mechanism from bacteria to regulate, disrupt, or correct genes related to key diseases. CRSP is currently targeting disease areas, including hemoglobinopathies, oncology, and regenerative medicines.

Founded in 2013 in Switzerland, CRSP has since grown to over 304 employees producing relatively inconsistent revenues ranging from $3M in 2018 to $290M in 2019 with expectations for 2020 at $6.7M. Their lead candidate is CTX001, an investigational autologous gene-edited hematopoietic stem cell therapy developed in partnership with Vertex Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:VRTX) for treating transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia (“TDT”) and severe sickle cell disease (“SCD”).

Products: CRSP’s pipeline consists of 9 therapeutics: 4 in the clinical phase and 5 in the research phase. Of the 4 clinical phase therapeutics, the first targets TDT and SCD (mentioned above: CTX001), while the 3 others fall into immuno-oncology covering: CD19+ malignancies (Product: CTX110), multiple myeloma (CTX120) and solid tumors and hematologic malignancies (CTX130). All immuno-oncology therapeutics are allogeneic CRISPR/Cas9 gene-edited CAR-T cell therapies wholly owned by CRISPR Therapeutics with data updates typically every 6 months.

Customers/market: For CRSP’s clinical phase pipeline, the total estimated 2022 global market potential is $220B with an average market size for each disease of $36.7B growing at an average 15.2% CAGR (median market: $13.3B | CAGR 10.9%). The largest market is Solid Tumors, at a 2022 estimated size of $145B (8.1% CAGR), and the highest CAGR market CAR T/CD19+ market at a 34.5% CAGR. For CTX001, the lead candidate, the target market can be broken down into the TDT market at very roughly $1.8B with a 10.8% CAGR and the SCD market

(RTTNews) – Stocks are likely to move to the upside in early trading on Monday, adding to the strong gains posted last week. The major index futures are pointing to a higher open for the markets, although the Dow futures are up a relatively modest 71 points compared to more than 220-point jump by the Nasdaq futures.

The markets may continue to benefit from optimism about a new stimulus bill even though House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said talks will “remain at an impasse” until “serious issues” with the Trump administration’s latest proposal are resolved.

The White House has increased its offer to $1.8 billion in its latest proposal, but Pelosi still called the administration’s proposed bill “grossly inadequate.”

“The news is filled with the numbers in terms of dollars. The heart of the matter is: can we allow the virus to rage on and ignore science as the Administration proposes, or will they accept the scientific strategic plan in the Heroes Act to crush the virus,” Pelosi said in a letter to her Democratic colleagues.

“We have other differences in terms of who benefits from the spending,” she added. “But in terms of addressing testing, tracing and treatment, what the Trump Administration has offered is wholly insufficient.”

Meanwhile, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows sent a letter to members of the House and Senate accusing Democrats of refusing to compromise on bipartisan legislation.

“It is not just about the top-line number but also about legislation that can be passed by both the House and the Senate and signed into law by President Trump to help the American people,” Mnuchin and Meadows wrote.

Mnuchin and Meadows urged Congress to vote on a bill allowing the administration to spend unused Paycheck Protection Program funds while negotiations

TOKYO – The dollar inched up in early Monday trade as riskier currencies slipped after negotiation on a U.S. stimulus package ran into resistance and as the yuan dropped after China’s central bank took a measure seen as aimed at curbing its strength.

The euro slipped 0.15% to $1.1818 EUR= while the Australian dollar shed 0.25% to $0.7223 AUD=D4.

The yen was little changed at 105.65 to the dollar JPY=.

WHY EVERY ONE OF YOUR DOLLARS DURING CORONAVIRUS NEEDS A NAME: DAVE RAMSEY

The U.S. dollar index edged up to 93.104 =USD, bouncing back from Friday’s near-three-week low of 92.997. The index saw its biggest loss in six weeks on Friday on hopes that a deal for new U.S. stimulus would be reached.

President Donald Trump on Friday offered a $1.8 trillion coronavirus relief package in talks with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi – moving closer to Pelosi’s $2.2 trillion proposal.

But Trump’s offer drew criticism from several Senate Republicans, many of whom are uneasy about the nation’s growing debt and concerned a deal would cost Republicans support in the upcoming presidential election, denting the risk-on mood.

The dollar inched up in early Monday trade as riskier currencies slipped after negotiation on a U.S. stimulus package ran into resistance and as the yuan dropped after China’s central bank took a measure seen as aimed at curbing its strength. (iStock


Still, with Nov. 3 election only weeks away, investors bet that Democrat Joe Biden is more likely to win the U.S. presidency and offer a larger economic package.

“On the whole, the big picture has not changed that much,” said Kyosuke Suzuki, director of forex at Societe Generale.

The offshore Chinese yuan dropped after the People’s Bank of

Yesterday’s JOLTS report for August showed a jobs market that is still just beginning to mend. Hires were up, and layoffs and discharges were down, which is good, but job openings and voluntary quits both declined.

We are far enough along past the worst of the pandemic jobs losses that it is worthwhile to compare the state of the various JOLTS components with the two previous recoveries from recession bottoms in the series’ histories (this is because the JOLTS data only dates from 2001).

In the two past recoveries:

  • First, layoffs declined
  • Second, hiring rose
  • Third, job openings rose and voluntary quits increased, close to simultaneously

Let’s examine each of those in turn. In each case, I break out 2001-19 in a first graph and then this year in a second.

This first graph compares layoffs and discharges (blue) with the 4-week average of initial jobless claims (red):

Figure 1

You can see that, by the end of the recessions, layoffs were already declining and continued to decline steeply over the next 3-8 months before reaching a “normal” expansion level. The turning point coincides exactly with the much less volatile but more slowly declining level of initial jobless claims.

The same has been the case this year, as layoffs and discharges already declined to their “normal” level in May, while initial jobless claims peaked one to two months later and have been declining (slowly) ever since.

Next, here are hires (red) and job openings (blue):

You can see that actual hires started to increase one to two months before job openings.

This year, both made troughs in April, but hires rebounded sharply in May and June compared with job openings.

Finally, here are quits (green) vs. job openings (blue):

Actual hiring started to rise slightly before quits made a bottom.