Dear Amy: I am a personal trainer in my early 20s. I have been hooking up with a woman (almost 40) for the past few months, two or three times a week. Her husband found out about us. Yesterday, he called the gym where I work and also called my mother and told her I was sleeping with his wife. My mom is furious. Then he came after me at the gym.

I told him to calm down, but he took a swing at me and we fought. I knocked him out cold. He was out cold for about five minutes on the floor.

The manager at the gym fired me for fighting. I think it was wrong of the manager to do that, as I was only defending myself.

Now I’m wondering how to get my job back. I talked to my lady friend and she told me her husband is home in bed with a couple of broken ribs and a headache. He couldn’t go to work today.

How can I get my job back?

— Well Trained

Dear Trained: “My mom is furious” is a sign that you aren’t grown up enough to shoulder the burden of being a true badass. I hope you wise up.

I think you are very lucky that you weren’t arrested for assault. Your manager was justified in firing you. Your behavior put this business (and other patrons) at great risk.

I would not want to attend a gym where a trainer regularly hooked up with a married patron, and then beat that person’s husband to unconsciousness – right there in the gym. You obviously take no responsibility for your own actions and how they contributed to the outcome.

Dear Amy: I always assumed that my hairstylist of many years and I

I told him to calm down, but he took a swing at me and we fought. I knocked him out cold. He was out cold for about five minutes on the floor.

The manager at the gym fired me for fighting. I think it was wrong of the manager to do that, as I was only defending myself.

Now I’m wondering how to get my job back. I talked to my lady friend, and she told me her husband is home in bed with a couple of broken ribs and a headache. He couldn’t go to work today.

How can I get my job back?

Well Trained: “My mom is furious” is a sign that you aren’t grown up enough to shoulder the burden of being a true badass. I hope you wise up.

I think you are very lucky that you weren’t arrested for assault. Your manager was justified in firing you. Your behavior put this business (and other patrons) at great risk.

I would not want to attend a gym where a trainer regularly hooked up with a married patron, and then beat that person’s husband to unconsciousness — right there in the gym. You obviously take no responsibility for your own actions and how they contributed to the outcome.

Dear Amy: I always assumed that my hairstylist of many years and I didn’t see eye to eye on most political issues, but we kept our talk to personal lives and movies and TV shows.

She’s a genuinely nice person, and I’m certain she’s kind to everyone.

Then on social media, she attacked a politician I truly admire.

I just can’t go back to her as if nothing happened. I just can’t go back at all.

Should I ghost her, or should I tell her that I’m switching

Ruth Malhotra had just arrived in Florida for a vacation with some girlfriends from high school and their families when President Donald Trump was scheduled to introduce his next nominee for the Supreme Court on Saturday afternoon. A college football game was on the television at their rented beach house. “Turn off football and turn on CSPAN!” she told her friends. “We’ve got to watch this; this is historic.”

Malhotra, 36, a lifelong evangelical Christian who works in communications for a Christian ministry, has little personal affection for Trump. So she was surprised to find herself tearing up as he introduced Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden, describing her as “a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials, and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution.”

Malhotra’s mother was watching at home back in Georgia, and felt a spark of recognition in Trump’s description of a selfless, family-oriented woman who reveres the Constitution. Her mother texted: “Trump’s description of Amy reminds me of you.”

Barrett’s nomination pleased many conservatives, who see in her legal credentials and judicial philosophy the potential for her to be the next Antonin Scalia, a solidly conservative presence on the court for decades.

But for many conservative Christian women, the thrill of the nomination is more personal. Barrett, for them, is a new kind of icon — one they have not seen before in American cultural and political life: a woman who is both unabashedly ambitious and deeply religious, who has excelled at the heights of a demanding profession even as she speaks openly about prioritizing her conservative Catholic faith and family. Barrett has seven children, including two children adopted from Haiti and a young son with Down syndrome.

U.S. Supreme Court vacancy

“I found some personal inspiration in Ginsburg — you couldn’t not,” said

Ruth Malhotra had just arrived in Florida for a vacation with some girlfriends from high school and their families when President Trump was scheduled to introduce his next nominee for the Supreme Court on Saturday afternoon. A college football game was on the television at their rented beach house. “Turn off football and turn on CSPAN!” she told her friends. “We’ve got to watch this; this is historic.”

Ms. Malhotra, 36, a lifelong evangelical Christian who works in communications for a Christian ministry, has little personal affection for President Trump. So she was surprised to find herself tearing up as he introduced Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden, describing her as “a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials, and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution.”

Ms. Malhotra’s mother was watching at home back in Georgia, and felt a spark of recognition in Mr. Trump’s description of a selfless, family-oriented woman who reveres the Constitution. Her mother texted: “Trump’s description of Amy reminds me of you.”

Judge Barrett’s nomination pleased many conservatives, who see in her legal credentials and judicial philosophy the potential for her to be the next Antonin Scalia, a solidly conservative presence on the court for decades.

But for many conservative Christian women, the thrill of the nomination is more personal. Judge Barrett, for them, is a new kind of icon — one they have not seen before in American cultural and political life: a woman who is both unabashedly ambitious and deeply religious, who has excelled at the heights of a demanding profession even as she speaks openly about prioritizing her conservative Catholic faith and family. Judge Barrett has seven children, including two children adopted from Haiti and a young son with Down syndrome.

“I found some personal inspiration in Ginsburg — you couldn’t