• Jade Darmawangsa has 381,000 YouTube subscribers and has expanded her channel into a full-time business by working with brands on sponsorships and collaborations.
  • Darmawangsa uses a media kit as a tool to showcase her value to a brand or company.
  • She shared the exact 4-page document she uses to land deals and the rates she charges. 
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter.

YouTube creator Jade Darmawangsa (381,000 subscribers) expanded her channel into a full-time business by working with brands on sponsorships. 

Her social-media business mainly generates income through brand deals and the Google-placed ads that play in her YouTube videos, she told Business Insider.

On average, she charges between $2,000 and $5,000 for a YouTube brand sponsorship, and between $500 and $2,000 for a sponsored Instagram post, she said. On YouTube, her monthly earnings vary, and the most she’s made from a single video is around $5,000, according to a screenshot of her dashboard viewed by Business Insider.

When trying to land brand deals, Darmawangsa uses a media kit as a tool to showcase her value to a brand or company. Media kits often contain a variety of types of information, including performance metrics, which are a key component for brands, according to Alessandro Bogliari, the cofounder and CEO of The Influencer Marketing Factory.

“When I say metrics, I don’t talk only about vanity metrics (likes, comments, views) but also about conversions,” he said in an email earlier this year. “A lot of brands are looking not only anymore for brand awareness but for real conversions (sign-ups, e-commerce sales, use of promo codes, etc). If we see any reference to actual important numbers and metrics in an influencer kit we know that we are talking with a professional that cares about giving real value to our client.”

Darmawangsa’s media kit

BYU-Idaho says it will seek out and possibly expel students who may have intentionally tried to be infected with the coronavirus.

An Idaho college says it is “deeply troubled” by reports that people in its community may have intentionally exposed themselves to the coronavirus in the hopes of being paid more for plasma donations that could contain COVID-19 antibodies.

BYU-Idaho, located in the southeastern town of Rexburg, says it is actively searching to find out if any of its students have done this.

“Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university said in a statement.

Some private blood banks pay more for plasma that contains COVID-19 antibodies.

The university cautioned last month that it may have to shut down the campus and switch to an all-remote learning format if a recent upward trend of COVID-19 cases in Idaho and Madison County continue. 

The university says it realizes that the pandemic ls leading to strains on the community, including financial.

“There is never a need to resort to behavior that endangers health or safety in order to make ends meet,” the university said, offering contact information for student resources.

Idaho currently ranks sixth in the country for new cases per capita, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University, with more than 48,660 total confirmed cases of coronavirus statewide. So far more than 500 Idaho residents have died because of COVID-19.

RELATED: US colleges struggle to salvage semester amid COVID-19 outbreaks

RELATED: Reports: Several COVID-19 positive students in Ohio throw house party despite quarantine

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source Article

Press release content from Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

TORONTO – October 14, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

​​​Kids are like sponges when it comes to new concepts, making this the perfect time to teach financial literacy. Research shows that the younger you teach children about money, the more independent and responsible they will be as adults. This is why Treasure exists. Treasure, a mobile money management app has been built to teach kids the value of money, fun ways to earn and save their allowance and money received through gifts.

“Financial literacy is a key life skill, but schools don’t teach finance-related courses properly until middle school or high school, and I think that is not only crazy but also way too late to form good habits,” said Matt O’Leary, CEO of Treasure. “Kids need money skills as soon as they can count. My own kids would ask for things in the store without realizing the cost or need to take money to school as early as kindergarten, and that’s when I realized that kids need money skills as soon as they can count.” 

Treasure is a fun-first education tool that teaches positive financial habits around saving and spending, but unlike other tools, Treasure uses real money with real spending and saving options using the bank of Mom and Dad through allowance and task-driven incentives. 

“We all know someone who got in trouble when they got their first credit card. This is because a credit card isn’t money. It’s just an abstract concept,” says O’Leary. “Our research has shown that the reason it is important to start teaching kids about money as early as possible is based on the fact that many financial decisions are based on abstract logic

More than 22 million American jobs were lost in the past six months; stock markets have been up and down; and people are generally anxious about what’s in their bank accounts right now.



text, letter


© Provided by CNBC


If you’re lucky enough to have the funds you need despite all the recent economic turbulence, ask yourself one key question, says Bradley T. Klontz, an associate professor of financial psychology at Creighton University: “Why is it OK for you to have money when other people don’t?”

Loading...

Load Error

Answering this question is not about comparing your finances to anyone else’s, he told The New York Times. It’s about seeing money as a tool, rather than as a measuring stick.

More from Grow:4 money moves to make in your 30s to be richer in your 40s

5 suburbs where you get the biggest apartments

177 self-made millionaires share their wealth-building habits

Having a satisfying answer is crucial, “particularly if you come into money fast,” he says. “If you don’t have a good answer, you’re going to sabotage yourself. You’re going to find ways to get rid of it.” Or, he warns, you could end up feeling disconnected from and less active in your community. Remember that “we’re here to make the world a better place,” and money can help you do that.

Wasting time on comparisons or feeling guilty isn’t helpful as it can lead to impulsive decisions or distract from your long-term financial goals. Instead, it’s important to know how to maintain a budget no matter your net worth, and to understand how you earned your money and what you want to do with it, including how it can help you make good, productive decisions.

Understand what money means to you—and have a plan

A 2019 study from Applied Research in

Quiz: What’s one advantage the president has that the market does not?

Answer: He can get a doctor’s note telling you everything is wonderful. 

But investors? They’re left on their own, left trying to forecast when a stimulus bill will land, left watching every vaccine trial to spot a winner, left waiting up at night for earnings reports, and left tracking technical indicators for clues about what’s churning underneath the surface. 

Fortunately, investors do, however, have experts who can guide them. Helping us get through this messy, mucky October are Real Money and Real Money Pro writers Jim Cramer, Paul Price, Maleeha Bengali, Alex Frew McMillan, and Jim Collins.

Jim Cramer: Let’s Beat Covid-19

Cramer lays out what is happening right now to get the pandemic under control and what it will look like not that long from now — even before a vaccine is available.

Here’s the tests and therapies that Cramer contends will change the channel on the Covid outlook.

Price: Give Stocks a Second Chance 

Few stocks go up in straight-line moves. Instead, writes Price, most tend to spurt higher, tail off, then rise again. While the interim selloffs often shake out traders who mainly trade on momentum, plus those who fail to understand the companies’ true worth, there’s still opportunity awaiting for those willing to give second chances.

See how Price would play a select group of stocks — even following their earlier rebounds from March’s lows.

Jim Collins: There’s Trouble in Bubbleland 

We are in the midst of a unprecedented financial bubble, writes Collins. Will a recovery from the Covid-19 lockdowns ease the bubble before it bursts in our faces?

Read why Collins isn’t holding his breath, and how the situation could play out for insurers and others. 

Bengali: It’s Value Vs. Growth. Pick One.