Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a drive-in rally in Miramar, Florida on October 13, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a drive-in rally in Miramar, Florida on October 13, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – Democrat Joe Biden and his fellow Democrats rail against President Trump and Republicans for wanting to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, with its high premiums and co-pays and limited options for millions of Americans.

But even Biden isn’t satisfied with the law as it now stands.

At a campaign stop in Miramar, Florida on Tuesday, Biden urged a larger role for government in Americans’ health insurance coverage, including bigger subsidies and expanded Medicaid/Medicare:

“Together, we’ll build on the Affordable Care Act by adding–by adding a new health insurance option, a not-for-profit option, to give private insurers a real competitor,” Biden said.

“We’ll increase (government) subsidies so premiums are lower cost to get more coverage, lower deductibles, lower out-of-pocket expenses.

“And by the way, anybody, anybody who qualifies for Medicare, but lives in a state like your governor that doesn’t allow for 800,000 people to have it, will automatically be enrolled. It’s wrong.”

Biden meant “anyone who qualifies for Medicaid”; Florida has not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. But Biden also could have been thinking about Medicare for all, which has always been the goal of Democrats.

According to the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force Recommendations, Democrats will secure universal health care through a public option, as follows:

Private insurers need real competition to ensure they have incentive to provide affordable, quality coverage to every American. To achieve that objective, we will give all Americans the choice to select a high-quality, affordable public option through the Affordable Care Act marketplace.

The public option will provide at least one plan choice without deductibles, will be administered by the traditional Medicare program, not private



a group of people in a room: COVID-19 treatment: Dealing with denial of cashless settlement and huge deductions in health insurance claims


© Venkatasubramanian K
COVID-19 treatment: Dealing with denial of cashless settlement and huge deductions in health insurance claims

In the past few months, we’ve heard several stories of people with health insurance policies facing claim rejections, not getting cashless treatments, or having to pay hospital bills out of pocket for COVID-19 hospitalizations. There could be many reasons that insurers give for rejecting claims. Some situations are avoidable. You must ensure that a COVID diagnosis or treatment does not burn a hole into your hard-earned savings.

This article discusses some such key issues, along with actions you could take to avoid or reduce the financial burden of an already taxing health situation.

Claims declined for mild symptom cases: Health Insurance policies cover hospitalization treatments that are considered ‘necessary’ – where there is active treatment carried out in a hospital, under any local or international medical protocol. The claim could be declined if the hospitalization is only for monitoring or investigations, without active treatment.  In the current pandemic, isolation of a patient who is asymptomatic/ has only mild symptoms, where treatment could be managed at home is considered hospitalization without any active line of treatment and hence claims are declined.

What you should do: If you are diagnosed as asymptomatic or have mild symptoms, based on your treating doctor’s advice, you must explore home isolation as an option. If your current residence cannot accommodate isolation, you should prepare yourself for bearing the cost of isolation at a quarantine centre from your own pocket, since this expense is out of the scope of any health insurance policy.

Cashless facility declined, deposit is required: It is being reported that hospitals, part of the empanelled cashless network of insurance companies, are often not honouring cashless facilities. These hospitals are demanding huge deposits before admitting the

Health insurance companies are offering their corporate customers rebates to offset premium costs and reflect lower medical spending as patients avoid doctors’ offices, routine procedures and elective surgeries during the coronavirus pandemic.



a person sitting at a desk: ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children's Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


© Karen Warren, Staff Photographer / Houston Chronicle

ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children’s Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


It’s unclear how big an impact the rebates, in the form of credits, might have on the premiums companies pay and contributions their employees make. Premiums vary from company to company and, depending on the circumstances, the rebates could lower premiums, keep them from rising or at least limit increases.

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Companies, meanwhile, will decide whether to adjust employee contributions to health insurance premiums based on the rebates they might receive.

Fewer claims were filed during the pandemic, meaning insurance companies paid out less, kept more of the premiums they collect and earned higher profits. As a result, insurers are coming under pressure to return some of the windfall to customers, particularly since the Affordable Care Act prohibits insurers from keeping more that more than 20 percent of premiums for administrative costs and profits.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued guidance in August that allows insurers to refund the excess profits this or next year as premium credits, which are discounts that reduce the amount paid monthly.

On Tuesday, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas said it would help customers during the pandemic by issuing $104 million in premium credits to employers that it insures. It also said it would adjust the price of 2021 premiums for individual and group plans, saving buyers

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 14, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — In a release issued under the same headline earlier today by Insurance Acquisition Corp. (NASDAQ: INSU) and Shift, please note that dates included in the press release were incorrect. Shift will begin trading on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol “SFT” and its senior management will host an investor conference call on October 15, 2020, not October 14, 2020, as previously stated. The corrected release follows.

Shift Completes Merger with Insurance Acquisition Corp. on its Path to Public Listing, Transaction Delivers $340 Million to Support Growth and Working Capital

Shift will begin trading on NASDAQ under ticker SFT on October 15, 2020

Shift’s senior management to host investor conference call on October 15, 2020 at 8:00am EDT

Shift, a leading end-to-end ecommerce platform for buying and selling used cars, and Insurance Acquisition Corp. (Nasdaq: INSU), a publicly traded special purpose acquisition company sponsored by Cohen & Company (NYSE American: COHN), have announced the closing of their previously announced business combination. The business combination, which was approved on October 13, 2020, by INSU’s stockholders, brings the newest pure-play in the used car ecommerce market to the public markets. The transaction provides Shift with approximately $300 million, net of fees and expenses. Beginning October 15, 2020, Shift’s shares of Class A common stock will trade on the Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “SFT” and warrants under ticker symbol “SFTTW.” Shift’s co-CEOs, George Arison and Toby Russell, will host an investor update call on October 15, 2020 at 8:00am EDT.

Shift has built a state-of-the-art automotive ecommerce company powered by its unique technology platform and service model. Leveraging proprietary technology, Shift delivers a comprehensive and seamless process for consumers to buy, sell, trade, finance, and own used cars.

“Today marks an important milestone for our company.

Australia’s banking and insurance regulator has estimated the country should be spending about $3.5bn a year to limit damage from climate-related natural disasters, warning the cost of responding to them after the fact is likely to be 11 times greater.



a close up of an old building: Photograph: James Gourley/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: James Gourley/AAP

In a speech on Wednesday, Geoff Summerhayes, an executive board member of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority, said the cost of pre-emptive action to avoid the impact of disasters exacerbated by the climate crisis was far cheaper than dealing with the aftermath.

Addressing the issue of rising insurance premiums in northern Australia due to an increasing number of claims caused by storms and cyclones, Summerhayes said Apra was concerned general insurance could become unaffordable or unavailable in parts of the country.

He said it heightened the need to both cut greenhouse gas emissions and increase community resilience to extreme climate events, such as last summer’s catastrophic bushfires.

Related: Investors lead push for Australian business to cut emissions more than government forecasts

“Investing in the types of resilience, mitigation and hazard reduction measures needed to better protect Australian communities – and keep insurance affordable and accessible – comes at a cost,” he told an Australian Business Roundtable webinar. “But as we witnessed last summer, failing to take action can be far more costly in the long run, and the price paid is often far more valuable than can be measured in dollars.”

Summerhayes cited research by the business roundtable that predicted the total economic cost of natural disasters in Australia would reach $39bn a year by 2050. Based on evidence from the US that every $1 spent on resilience measures saves up to

$11 in response and recovery costs, he said covering those losses would require the community to invest about $3.5bn a