The number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 rose to 33.4 million on Tuesday, a day after the global death toll reached 1 million, as governments around the world moved to reimpose restrictions on movement in a fight to contain the spread.

Governments across Europe are grappling with rising infections, including in countries like Germany that appeared to have the crisis under control earlier this year, and some including Italy, France and the U.K., are considering or have imposed new emergency measures. South America, parts of Asia and the Middle East are still counting thousands of new cases a day with no sign the virus is slowing, according to data aggregated by Johns Hopkins University that has become a global benchmark for tracking the virus.

Dr. Michael Ryan, head of the World Health Organization’s emergencies program, said Monday the true toll from COVID-19 likely exceeds 1 million. Experts have cautioned that there are discrepancies between how data is collected and reported in different countries.

“When you count anything, you never count it perfectly,” he told reporters at a press briefing in Geneva. “But I can assure you that the current numbers are likely an underestimate of the true toll of COVID.”


“Responsible leadership matters. Science matters. Cooperation matters – and misinformation kills. As the relentless hunt for a vaccine continues – a vaccine that must be available and affordable to all – let’s do our part to save lives.”


— António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations

The U.S., which accounts for just 4% of the world’s population, continues to lead in case numbers and fatalities, with 7.2 million confirmed case and 205,091 deaths, almost a fifth of the global total. Experts have said the numbers would be lower if the U.S. had stuck with a consistent



a group of baseball players standing on top of a grass covered field: A President Donald Trump and a former Vice President Joe Biden supporter converse before the Joe Biden Campaign Rally at the National World War I Museum and Memorial on March 7, 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)


© (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)
A President Donald Trump and a former Vice President Joe Biden supporter converse before the Joe Biden Campaign Rally at the National World War I Museum and Memorial on March 7, 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)

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Stocks fell in Europe on Tuesday, as investors ditched riskier assets, such as industrial commodities and took some profit on the dollar’s two-month highs ahead of the first of three presidential debates later in the day and as the global coronavirus death toll passed 1 million.

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Incumbent Republican candidate Donald Trump faces Democrat opponent Joe Biden later in the day in the first of three televised debates running up to the November 3 election. 

Investors in stocks have grown increasingly nervous about the race for the White House and, in particular, over the prospect of a delay to the final result, which has been partly responsible for the 4% drop in the S&P 500 this month and the flow of cash into the dollar.

“Historically the debate isn’t a big market moving event,” Fiona Cincotta, a strategist at spread-better CityIndex, said. “However, given the backdrop of coronavirus and a record breaking contraction in Q2, the public could be more easily swayed than in other years and investors could be twitchier than usual, meaning