Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Thursday touted $500,000 the city’s getting from restaurant delivery company DoorDash to winterize Chicago restaurants, while proposals by aldermen to further crack down on such apps during the coronavirus pandemic languish in City Council committees.



Erica Hunt et al. posing for the camera: Mayor Lori Lightfoot visits Camp DoorDash at the 2019 Taste of Chicago in Grant Park.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Mayor Lori Lightfoot visits Camp DoorDash at the 2019 Taste of Chicago in Grant Park.

In announcing the grant from the delivery company to help restaurants prepare for winter, Lightfoot thanked DoorDash “for investing in Chicago and its restaurants to assist them in continuing to serve Chicagoans this winter.”

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Third-party apps such as DoorDash, Grubhub and Uber Eats that charge additional fees to restaurants to deliver meals have drawn increasing scrutiny from elected officials since the virus outbreak began, as diners skittish about eating inside restaurants have been ordering more to-go meals, fueling a boom for the companies.

During a May City Council committee hearing, struggling restaurateurs said the companies charge 30% or more to deliver food, and sometimes set up their own websites masquerading as those of the restaurants themselves.

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Northwest Side Ald. Scott Waguespack, 32nd, introduced an ordinance to cap fees at 5% of the cost of the meal, but it got shunted to the City Council Rules Committee, where ideas the mayor opposes often get sent to die.

And while the council did adopt Lightfoot-backed rules requiring delivery apps to itemize the fees they charge, stricter bench marks backed by downtown Ald. Brendan Reilly, 42nd, have gone nowhere.

Reilly on Thursday said if the city wanted to really throw a lifeline to struggling restaurants, it would adopt the tougher standards, and the companies would readily agree to abide by them.

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In a filing, Lyft (LYFT +0.7%) reveals expanding its insurance carrier partnerships to include Allstate, Liberty Mutual, and CSAA subsidiary Mobilitas.

Lyft plans to continue working with Progressive, AXA-XI, and Constitution State Services, which is Travelers’ third-party administrator.

The ride-hail company expects the changes to reduce potential volatility in its insurance costs for the policy year ending on September 30, 2021.

Lyft requires drivers to have personal auto insurance that meets the minimum state requirements, but notes that not all personal policies will cover accidents that happen while driving for the company.

For cases where personal coverage doesn’t apply, Lyft offers third-party liability coverage through its partner network.

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