For a change, investors aren’t having to count on tech stocks to deliver the goods. The S&P 500 Index (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC) gained 27 points, up 0.8%, on Oct. 8. The Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF (NYSEMKT: XLK) gained 0.5%, while the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (NYSEMKT: XLE) surged 4.1% higher on another strong day for crude oil. IBM (NYSE: IBM) was the sole tech giant to have a big day, with shares gaining over 5% on news it was going to spin off part of its business.

Utility and real estate stocks, segments that usually do well in a recession but have underperformed in a 2020 that’s been anything but usual, also finished up today. Every stock in both sectors closed higher, with DTE Energy (NYSE: DTE) up 6.3% and Iron Mountain (NYSE: IRM) up 4%, leading the way.

Oil barrel and pumpjack paperweights on pile of cash.

Image source: Getty Images.

Is oil back? Investors are behaving that way

After falling sharply on supply/demand worries and the Friday announcement that President Donald Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19, West Texas Intermediate crude oil futures have surged from a low of $37 to today’s price above $41 per barrel.

Big Oil won big today, with Occidental Petroleum (NYSE: OXY) up 8.8% and Halliburton (NYSE: HAL) up 7.4%, two of the S&P’s biggest gainers. More than half of today’s biggest gainers in the index operate in the oil patch, including global giant ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM), which added 5.3% and reclaimed its place as the biggest of the U.S. big oil companies, only a day after temporarily falling behind Chevron (NYSE: CVX) in market cap size.

Today’s move higher for the oil sector came on a combination of things behind crude oil’s move higher. To start, oil prices are moving up on worries about oil and refinery production in the

By Christoph Steitz and Alexander Hübner

FRANKFURT/MUNICH (Reuters) – Shares in Siemens Energy

opened lower than expected on their first day of trading on the Frankfurt stock exchange, as Germany’s biggest-ever spin-off gears up for a challenging future independent from parent Siemens

.

Shares in Siemens Energy – which makes gas turbines, power transmission systems and holds a 67% stake in Siemens Gamesa

– opened at 22.01 euros apiece on Monday, giving the company a market value of 16 billion euros ($18.6 billion).

A source had previously said estimates were for a market valuation of between 21-22 billion euros.

Shares eventually closed at 21.21 euros, down 3.6% from the first price, after trading in a range of 19.21-22.98 euros during the session. This puts Siemens Energy’s market capitalisation at 15.4 billion euros.

“I have repeatedly pointed out that we expect volatility to be high in the first few weeks,” Siemens Chief Financial Officer Ralf Thomas told Reuters. “It’s not a situation specific to Siemens Energy, it’s the same with every spin-off.”

Siemens Energy is Germany’s largest spin-off ever, even surpassing Lanxess

and Covestro <1COV.DE>, which were both spun off from Bayer

.

For Siemens AG investors the deal has paid off: They have received one Siemens Energy share for every two shares they own in the former parent. Yet Siemens shares traded only 1.7% below Friday’s closing price, a tiny discount given a substantial part of the conglomerate has been spun out in a separate listing.

Thomas said it would take until at least mid-October to get a first idea of how Siemens Energy, which competes with General Electric

and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries <7011.T>, will be valued.

Spun off from Siemens due to weak profit margins, the unit is expecting an adjusted margin of not more than 1% in 2020