President Donald Trump has insisted he would sign a standalone bill prior the election for more stimulus checks to be sent to Americans—though time is running out for money to be able to arrive with people before Election Day on November 3.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a bill signing ceremony for H.R. 748, the CARES Act in the Oval Office of the White House on March 27, 2020. He has said he would sign a standalone bill to grant more Economic Impact Payments.


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U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a bill signing ceremony for H.R. 748, the CARES Act in the Oval Office of the White House on March 27, 2020. He has said he would sign a standalone bill to grant more Economic Impact Payments.

While Trump called off talks aiming to agree a bipartisan relief package amid the COVID-19 crisis, he has indicated a willingness to enact measures in a piecemeal fashion and has declared his support for a further round of Economic Impact Payments.

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In regards to signing such a bill, he tweeted: “Move Fast, I Am Waiting To Sign!”

The CARES Act, which was signed more than six months ago, granted eligible individuals $1,200, which was paid via direct deposit, checks or on pre-paid debit cards.

A second round of such payments would likely be processed by the Internal Revenue Service faster than the first round, according to IRS managers, although there would still be a delay in them being approved for distribution.

It has previously been suggested by IRS managers that a second round of payments would be released faster than the first, because relevant systems would already be in place and more people’s details would likely be up to date.

However, though the process could be quicker, there would still be a cut off as to how late payments could be sent in order to arrive before Election Day, Chad

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An engineer works in the general laboratory during a media tour of a new factory built to produce a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine


WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images

A briefing document published today by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration makes it clear that President Trump won’t be able to push through a Covid-19 vaccine before November’s election.

The FDA posted the 38-page briefing on its website, ahead of an Oct. 22 meeting of the agency’s outside scientific advisors on development and authorization of Covid vaccines. Inside, the agency reports that it has advised vaccine developers not to apply for an emergency use authorization until they’ve followed-up on clinical trial participants for an average of two months after the last shot.

A two month follow-up would make it late November for the vaccine being tested by

Pfizer

(ticker: PFE) and

BioNTech

(BNTX), writes Raymond James analyst Steven Seedhouse in a Tuesday note. That vaccine had been regarded as the front-runner, with a clinical trial design that Pfizer executives thought would yield an answer before October’s end.

But Seedhouse says the agency’s request for two months of safety and efficacy data would likely delay a Pfizer submission until around the same time as

Moderna

(MRNA), whose readout was expected in November.

Johnson & Johnson

(JNJ) expected results of its pivotal vaccine trial in December or January.

News reports have said the White House is blocking the FDA from issuing guidelines that require two months of surveillance. But today’s briefing document shows that the agency had already advised vaccine developers that such data should be part of their submissions.

The ball is now in the manufacturers’ court, says the Raymond James analyst. Nine vaccine companies had pledged last month to resist political pressure and only request approval after trials that met FDA requirements.