The bad news for the movie business keeps piling up, enough that B. Riley analyst Eric Wold further cut his box office forecasts for both this year and 2021, before suggesting something of a return to old levels in 2022.

But in the meantime, the pandemic pinch that left theaters shut for months and Hollywood studios rescheduling most of their slates into next year or beyond continues to batter the business.

The latest news includes U.K. exhibitor chain Vue saying it will partially close a quarter of its screens during the week. The chain said in a statement that it will close 21 of its 87 theaters Tuesday through Thursday, beginning next week, “to ensure that our business is financially well-placed to withstand the uncertainty ahead.”

The move is similar to one by British competitor Odeon. Cineworld, which also owns the No. 2 U.S. chain Regal, took an even more drastic step, closing all its U.K. and U.S. locations for the next several weeks.

The situation is even more grim for B&B Theatres, the sixth-largest chain in the United States. The company warned that it was a few months away from bankruptcy if it doesn’t receive new content or government aid.

No. 1 U.S. chain AMC issued a similar warning last summer, then restructured its debt, cut a landmark revenue-sharing deal with NBCUniversal, and said it planned to issue 15 million new shares of stock. In response to the Cineworld closures, AMC said last week that it would keep theaters open and strive to open more, depending in part on potential revenues from that NBCU deal.

But the situation is ugly overall for the industry. Cineworld’s closure announcement came soon after MGM pushed back the

The stock market was volatile on Tuesday after posting solid gains to start the week. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI) was up 0.37% at 1:10 p.m. EDT today, outperforming the other major indexes.

One thing keeping the stock market in check could be comments from Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell, who warned on Tuesday that too little government aid would lead to a weak economic recovery. Congress has yet to agree on additional stimulus measures, and an agreement does not appear close.

Shares of Boeing (NYSE: BA) were moving in the wrong direction on Tuesday after the airplane manufacturer predicted a difficult decade ahead. Meanwhile, the stock of Walmart (NYSE: WMT) was little changed after the retailer announced an insurance brokerage business.

An airplane.

Image source: Getty Images.

Boeing forecasts tough years ahead

The coronavirus pandemic has greatly reduced demand for air travel. While the number of daily air passengers in the United States has improved since bottoming out in April, the Transportation Security Administration is still reporting year-over-year declines around 65%.

This lack of demand for air travel will have longer-term implications for the aviation industry. In its 2020 market outlook, Boeing predicted demand for 18,350 commercial airplanes over the next decade, down 11% from the comparable 2019 forecast.

While the next decade will be tough, Boeing is more optimistic when a 20-year period is considered. The company expects demand for 43,000 commercial airplanes over the next 20 years, which will drive the size of the global commercial fleet from 25,900 today to 48,400 by 2039. Passenger traffic is expected to grow by an average of 4% annually over the next two decades.

Boeing expects single-aisle airplanes to be the largest market segment, predicting 20-year demand of 32,270 planes. This category includes its 737 MAX, which is still grounded