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TORONTO – October 14, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

​​​Kids are like sponges when it comes to new concepts, making this the perfect time to teach financial literacy. Research shows that the younger you teach children about money, the more independent and responsible they will be as adults. This is why Treasure exists. Treasure, a mobile money management app has been built to teach kids the value of money, fun ways to earn and save their allowance and money received through gifts.

“Financial literacy is a key life skill, but schools don’t teach finance-related courses properly until middle school or high school, and I think that is not only crazy but also way too late to form good habits,” said Matt O’Leary, CEO of Treasure. “Kids need money skills as soon as they can count. My own kids would ask for things in the store without realizing the cost or need to take money to school as early as kindergarten, and that’s when I realized that kids need money skills as soon as they can count.” 

Treasure is a fun-first education tool that teaches positive financial habits around saving and spending, but unlike other tools, Treasure uses real money with real spending and saving options using the bank of Mom and Dad through allowance and task-driven incentives. 

“We all know someone who got in trouble when they got their first credit card. This is because a credit card isn’t money. It’s just an abstract concept,” says O’Leary. “Our research has shown that the reason it is important to start teaching kids about money as early as possible is based on the fact that many financial decisions are based on abstract logic

More than 22 million American jobs were lost in the past six months; stock markets have been up and down; and people are generally anxious about what’s in their bank accounts right now.



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If you’re lucky enough to have the funds you need despite all the recent economic turbulence, ask yourself one key question, says Bradley T. Klontz, an associate professor of financial psychology at Creighton University: “Why is it OK for you to have money when other people don’t?”

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Answering this question is not about comparing your finances to anyone else’s, he told The New York Times. It’s about seeing money as a tool, rather than as a measuring stick.

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Having a satisfying answer is crucial, “particularly if you come into money fast,” he says. “If you don’t have a good answer, you’re going to sabotage yourself. You’re going to find ways to get rid of it.” Or, he warns, you could end up feeling disconnected from and less active in your community. Remember that “we’re here to make the world a better place,” and money can help you do that.

Wasting time on comparisons or feeling guilty isn’t helpful as it can lead to impulsive decisions or distract from your long-term financial goals. Instead, it’s important to know how to maintain a budget no matter your net worth, and to understand how you earned your money and what you want to do with it, including how it can help you make good, productive decisions.

Understand what money means to you—and have a plan

A 2019 study from Applied Research in

Quiz: What’s one advantage the president has that the market does not?

Answer: He can get a doctor’s note telling you everything is wonderful. 

But investors? They’re left on their own, left trying to forecast when a stimulus bill will land, left watching every vaccine trial to spot a winner, left waiting up at night for earnings reports, and left tracking technical indicators for clues about what’s churning underneath the surface. 

Fortunately, investors do, however, have experts who can guide them. Helping us get through this messy, mucky October are Real Money and Real Money Pro writers Jim Cramer, Paul Price, Maleeha Bengali, Alex Frew McMillan, and Jim Collins.

Jim Cramer: Let’s Beat Covid-19

Cramer lays out what is happening right now to get the pandemic under control and what it will look like not that long from now — even before a vaccine is available.

Here’s the tests and therapies that Cramer contends will change the channel on the Covid outlook.

Price: Give Stocks a Second Chance 

Few stocks go up in straight-line moves. Instead, writes Price, most tend to spurt higher, tail off, then rise again. While the interim selloffs often shake out traders who mainly trade on momentum, plus those who fail to understand the companies’ true worth, there’s still opportunity awaiting for those willing to give second chances.

See how Price would play a select group of stocks — even following their earlier rebounds from March’s lows.

Jim Collins: There’s Trouble in Bubbleland 

We are in the midst of a unprecedented financial bubble, writes Collins. Will a recovery from the Covid-19 lockdowns ease the bubble before it bursts in our faces?

Read why Collins isn’t holding his breath, and how the situation could play out for insurers and others. 

Bengali: It’s Value Vs. Growth. Pick One.

As your business grows, you’ll likely have more capital in rotation. As you bring in more money, you will also need to spend more to continue growing. 

However, it’s important to ensure that you’re not spending in excess and are still saving money where you can. Otherwise, you may find yourself in the red and facing some exceptionally difficult financial decisions.

Below, 15 members of Forbes Coaches Council share their best advice for business owners looking to keep their operations lean and save money.

1. Observe, Plan And Earn Before You Spend

Understand, observe and become fully aware of your industry and the needs of your business. Learning to optimize your costs takes time, errors, small tests and planning based on the data you collect every day. Ask yourself what you can change or improve in your current cost structure. – Michelle de Matheu, The Mind, Body & Soul Stylist

2. Say ‘No’ More Than You Say ‘Yes’

In a growing company, it is easy to say “yes” to a new product or service, to a client that does not fit your ideal client profile or to a new business category or opportunity. If you want to stay lean, say “no” to anything that is not part of your core. Focus is powerful and leads to extraordinary results. – Chuck Gulledge, Chuck Gulledge Advisors

3. Use A Variable Staffing Model

Staff your business for the valleys and supplement with contractors for the peaks. Too often startups take their funding or early revenue and hire staff too quickly. It’s smart to use a variable staffing model to cover services effectively and find that quality mix of people on staff, on contract or

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., spent the time allotted for him to question Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett Tuesday on a “hypocritical monologue” that claimed “dark money” was behind her nomination, “The Five” co-host Dagen McDowell argued.

“I wanted to talk about Sheldon Whitehouse and the hypocritical monologue or lecture that he hacked up in front of her,” McDowell began. “[He didn’t] ask her one question. Not one. He implied that Amy Coney Barrett is not there because of her accomplishments, because of her intellect, because of how she’s lived her life, but that she’s there because she’s a pawn of dark money.

“Hypocrite! You know what that also is?” she asked. “That’s sexist. Let me call him out on it.”

McDowell recounted how Whitehouse, a former federal prosecutor, offered a 30-minute dissertation on how the Federalist Society and Judicial Crisis Network have purportedly conspired to spend millions of dollars in support of judicial nominees that support their agenda.

Whitehouse laid out his theory during th hearing on a posterboard labeled “The Scheme.”

“In all cases, there’s big anonymous money behind various lanes of activity,” he said, holding up a sign bearing the names of the Federalist Society and the Judicial Crisis Network along with a reference to legal “groups,” all of whom purportedly receive millions in anonymous donations as they influence judicial nominations and court cases.

Whitehouse further tied issues like abortion and health care to large donations to conservative judicial groups and statements from Republicans about judicial nominations.

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He then referred to briefs from Republican senators arguing that courts should overturn  the Affordable Care Act, as well as the claim often made by Democrats that Trump specifically chose Barrett for the Supreme Court to rule against the