Nasdaq Inc. is in talks with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott about potentially relocating the exchange’s electronic trading systems from New Jersey to Dallas-Fort Worth, according to two sources familiar with the discussions.

Other trading exchanges also could be involved in the discussions, both sources said.

Nasdaq is planning a visit to Texas to meet with the governor, according to one of the sources. Leaders of the exchange have had “a great dialogue” with Abbott, the source said.

The exchange, which lists about 176 Texas companies and has 87 employees in the state, is intrigued by an opportunity touted by Abbott to power its electronic infrastructure with renewable energy from wind farms in the state, according to one of the sources. Nasdaq is the trading platform for many of the nation’s environmentally conscious companies.

When Facebook invested $1 billion in building its massive data center at AllianceTexas north of Fort Worth, it struck a deal to buy its electricity from a 17,000-acre wind farm under construction at the time. Facebook, which trades on Nasdaq, is now planning to add to its 150-acre campus, which opened in 2017.

Dallas-Fort Worth isn’t alone in wooing the stock exchanges. Officials in Virginia, North Carolina and Illinois have also had discussions with Nasdaq, one of the sources said.

In a statement to The Dallas Morning News, Nasdaq vice president of communications Joe Christinat said: “We are assessing all options, but our No. 1 priority is protecting the U.S. capital markets and its investors.”

A spokesman for the New York Stock Exchange’s parent company, the Intercontinental Exchange, couldn’t be immediately reached for comment.

A potential tax on financial transactions in New Jersey, where Nasdaq and other exchanges house the data systems that power Wall Street’s daily trades, is what’s driving the talks.

NYSE, Nasdaq and

Movie theaters hoped to be back in business in a big way this fall, attracting stir-crazy audiences with a slate of blockbusters that included “Tenet,” “Mulan,” and “No Time to Die.” For an industry that had been brought to its knees by the coronavirus pandemic, with closures that left them without revenues for much of the year, nothing was more important than a grand and successful reopening.

Unfortunately, more than a month after “Tenet” debuted to disappointing box office results, the exhibition sector is in an even more dire situation. “Mulan” opted to debut as a premium on-demand offering via Disney Plus. “No Time to Die” pushed its premiere back into April, and several other movies have postponed their releases into next spring or summer when, studios hope, a vaccine will be widely available. On Saturday, Cineworld, one of the world’s largest exhibitors, announced that it was considering closing its theaters down, citing the lack of major releases available to screen. Other exhibitors may follow suit.

John Fithian, head of the National Association of Theatre Owners, believes that the main stumbling block preventing movie theaters from rebounding is Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s decision to keep cinemas closed indefinitely. That’s robbing studios of a major market to show their films, Fithian argues, which may jeopardize the release of upcoming blockbusters such as “Wonder Woman 1984” and Pixar’s “Soul.” In an interview with Variety, the theater business’s top lobbyist urged studios to keep releasing movies during the pandemic and warned that the industry faces financial ruin without government assistance.

“No Time to Die” has delayed its release until 2021. What impact will that have on the exhibition industry?

The Bond franchise is very important to exhibition, so we were disappointed with the move. The failure of Gov. Cuomo to allow movie theaters

Wildfire victims who lose their home and possessions will be able to recoup money for their expenses faster, thanks to legislation that makes property insurance benefits easier to collect.

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill 872 into law Thursday, providing a suite of insurance protections and streamlined claims processing to better respond to the recovery challenges residents face right after a disaster.

The law won’t take effect until next year. It got Newsom’s endorsement as Sonoma and Napa counties and numerous California communities confront property losses during two months of widespread fires that have burned 4 million acres statewide this year.

Sen. Bill Dodd, D-Napa, who co-authored the legislation, viewed it as part of the growing movement to address home insurance hurdles for disaster survivors after consecutive years of destructive wildfires in the North Bay, he said.

“None of these bills are a silver bullet, but all of them put together in a patchwork quilt of legislation are moving the needle and, I think, meeting the moment to really help consumers,” Dodd said.

The law requires insurance companies to pay up to four months of living expenses in advance, opposed to just one month now.

However, victims of this year’s blazes will go without that and other new regulations, including a provision that requires insurers to submit an advance payment of at least 25% for the value of lost possessions without having to file an inventory form.

The California Department of Insurance has received numerous complaints from residents who have struggled identifying every item that was lost in a fire, Commissioner Ricardo Lara said Friday in a prepared statement.

Lara urged insurance companies to help wildfire survivors and provide up to 100% of their personal property coverage limits without a detailed, itemized form, which has been a common request.

“Wildfire

Gov. David Ige today said the state launched a new virtual unemployment insurance call center that started today to handle the backlog in jobless claims.

Ige said today $4.9 million in federal coronavirus relief funds have been allocated to staff the 200-person call center to answer all types of claimant questions.

An antiquated computer system hamstrung the department and forced some unemployment claimants into a frustrating filing process, with many waiting months for financial relief. Ige said today that 96% of initial unemployment claims have been successfully filed online.

Those who are interested may ring up the new call center at 833-901-2272 and 833-901-2275. Callers will be put in touch with individuals who will serve all claims, including regular unemployment insurance, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) and Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service members (UCX).

Anne E. Perreira-Eustaquio, director of state Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, said the call center will be staffed with 40% locals and the rest will be individuals from the mainland who have been trained in resolving unemployment claims.

“We know we need to be out there to address the issues that claimants are having,” said Perreira-Eustaquio, who this month replaced Scott Murakami who resigned from his post in August after being on paid leave for two months.

Ige held a press conference this afternoon to discuss the latest update on the breakdown usage of the state’s coronavirus relief funds of $1.2 billion. Ige said 98% of the $863 million of the federal funds received by the state in April has been set aside to assist with response and recovery efforts.

“We do not plan to return any of the coronavirus relief funds,” Ige said today. “We plan to use every penny.”

To date, Ige said $51

It was not the process anyone wanted or expected, but Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said Wednesday everyone did the best they could to finalize a budget during a pandemic that created massive economic uncertainty. 

Michigan rival college coaches join Gov. Whitmer with common message: ‘Mask up’

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“In an ordinary year, there would be a lot more committee meetings, there would be a lot more opportunity to weigh in, and yet because of COVID-19 and the incredible public health crisis, we’ve had unique challenges to address here,” Whitmer said. 



Gretchen Whitmer standing in front of a building: Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during the Aretha L. Franklin Memorial Highway dedication ceremony in Detroit, Monday, August 24, 2020.


© Junfu Han, Detroit Free Press
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during the Aretha L. Franklin Memorial Highway dedication ceremony in Detroit, Monday, August 24, 2020.

“I recognize that, in an ordinary year, there’s a lot more ability for the public to participate. I regret that that wasn’t able to happen in the midst of all the crises that we are confronting. … I feel good about where this budget landed.”

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More: Michigan education spared big cuts in budget — but leaders say more money is needed

More: Michigan limits spending cuts to $250M under revamped budget plan for 2021

 Whitmer formally adopted next year’s state budget on Wednesday, one day before the start of the new financial year. At $62.7 billion dollars, the 2021 budget includes a $65-per-pupil funding increase for school districts while cutting only $250 million from an array of agencies and programs.  

The governor specifically highlighted several initiatives, including millions to help pregnant mothers receive the resources they need and adults obtain affordable training or certificates for jobs in a skilled trade. 

Earlier this year, Whitmer proposed allocating $37.5 million for the Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies program. The new