Freddie Flintoff
Freddie Flintoff

Freddie Flintoff wrestles with an insurance write-off Maserati on the Wall of Death in a new clip from the upcoming episode of Top Gear.

The TV star attempts circuits on the vertical face of the wall at Alexandra Palace, north London.

In the episode, Flintoff and co-hosts Paddy McGuinness and Chris Harris are convinced they have found a way of landing cheap performance cars, each buying a written-off model for less than £6,000.

After a trio of challenges at the Top Gear Test Track – including an inaugural game of Car Park Musical Chairs, where they meet Britain’s most reckless drivers, the Stig’s Teenage Cousins – the presenters are ordered to make their cars road legal and report to Alexandra Palace, where the Top Gear producers have constructed a huge Wall of Death.

As Flintoff begins the challenge, Harris says: “I think he has the worst vehicle for this by a mile.

“I’m worried what it’s going to do on the top banking at sustained speed.”

The Wall Of Death (BBC Studios/PA)

McGuinness adds: “I’ve got everything crossed nothing goes wrong with it but it’s just not a good look.”

As Flintoff sets of and gains height and speed, he says: “It’s a completely different experience, I can feel the weight of the car, it just wants to come down the wall.”

The episode also features McGuinness’s crash behind the wheel of a red Lamborghini Diablo.

Paddy McGuinness (BBC Studios/PA)

The TV star made headlines in June when he lost control and skidded on oil on a wet road.

The crash happened while the trio were celebrating the 200mph Club, when a handful of supercars exceeded 200mph in the 1980s and 90s.

The presenters each chose a car from that era – Harris a Ferrari F40, Flintoff a

By Erwin Seba



a close up of a wire fence: FILE PHOTO: Hurricane Delta passes through Cancun


© Reuters/HENRY ROMERO
FILE PHOTO: Hurricane Delta passes through Cancun

HOUSTON (Reuters) – Hurricane Delta shut power and toppled equipment at U.S. Gulf Coast oil refineries and closed oil-export ports as its destructive winds and storm surge reached far from its center.

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Nearly 700,000 homes and businesses in three Gulf Coast states were without power on Saturday after Delta made landfall overnight as a Category 2 hurricane with winds of 100 miles per hour (161 kph) near the town of Creole, Louisiana.

Delta’s fierce winds tore roofs off homes, cut electric power and disrupted energy operations as far away as Port Arthur, Texas, 65 miles (105 km) west of Delta’s landfall.

Total SA’s 225,500 barrel-per-day (bpd) refinery lost power, Valero Energy Corp’s 335,000 bpd plant lost a cooling tower, and Motiva Enterprises shut a small unit at its 607,000 bpd refinery amid the storm, people familiar with operations said.

Total quickly launched efforts to restart the oil-processing plant, the people said.

Total, Valero and Motiva did not reply to requests for comment.

Video: Hurricane Delta Is Already Slamming U.S. Oil and Gas Production (TheStreet)

Hurricane Delta Is Already Slamming U.S. Oil and Gas Production

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Royal Dutch Shell’s Convent, Geismar and Norco, Louisiana, oil and chemical plants were operating normally, a spokesman said.

Three other Louisiana refineries close to the storm’s track were previously shut for maintenance work or from damage by a more powerful hurricane six weeks ago. Those plants are operated by Citgo Petroleum and Phillips 66.

Cheniere Energy Inc, which operates a natural gas processing plant on the Texas-Louisiana border, was evaluating facilities on Saturday. Its Sabine Pass liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant remains online and employees were safe, a spokeswoman said.

Oil and petrochemical ports from

HOUSTON (Reuters) – Hurricane Delta shut power and toppled equipment at U.S. Gulf Coast oil refineries and closed oil-export ports as its destructive winds and storm surge reached far from its center.

Nearly 700,000 homes and businesses in three Gulf Coast states were without power on Saturday after Delta made landfall overnight as a Category 2 hurricane with winds of 100 miles per hour (161 kph) near the town of Creole, Louisiana.

Delta’s fierce winds tore roofs off homes, cut electric power and disrupted energy operations as far away as Port Arthur, Texas, 65 miles (105 km) west of Delta’s landfall.

Total SA’s 225,500 barrel-per-day (bpd) refinery lost power, Valero Energy Corp’s 335,000 bpd plant lost a cooling tower, and Motiva Enterprises shut a small unit at its 607,000 bpd refinery amid the storm, people familiar with operations said.

Total quickly launched efforts to restart the oil-processing plant, the people said.

Total, Valero and Motiva did not reply to requests for comment.

Royal Dutch Shell’s Convent, Geismar and Norco, Louisiana, oil and chemical plants were operating normally, a spokesman said.

Three other Louisiana refineries close to the storm’s track were previously shut for maintenance work or from damage by a more powerful hurricane six weeks ago. Those plants are operated by Citgo Petroleum and Phillips 66.

Cheniere Energy Inc, which operates a natural gas processing plant on the Texas-Louisiana border, was evaluating facilities on Saturday. Its Sabine Pass liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant remains online and employees were safe, a spokeswoman said.

Oil and petrochemical ports from Beaumont, Texas, to Lake Charles, Louisiana, were shut to commercial vessels ahead of the storm and remained closed on Saturday. Houston and Galveston were open and operating normally, data from the U.S. Coast Guard showed.

The hurricane cut most U.S. offshore Gulf

Flip A Coin: Heads – Full Recovery, Tails – Markets Crash

(Photo Credit)

The stock market feels like a coin toss these days. The presidential election is just over one month away. Donald Trump is recovering from COVID-19. The U.S. is politically and ideologically polarized, and the economy is a stretched balloon that can give way at any moment. Even if you buy in to the recovery hype, now might not be the ideal time to be going “all-in” to the stock market. But as long-term, buy and hold, dividend growth investors, we must remember that time in the market reigns supreme. September and October are historically the two worst-performing months for the stock market, but there are always opportunities for prudent investors. As always, we’re focused on religiously saving and disciplined investing every single month.

Here’s how our September panned out:

Dividend Income: 2020 (Blue) vs. 2019 (Red)

In September 2020, we pocketed $1,273.93 of dividend income. Compared YoY to September 2019, which saw $1,188.98 in dividends, that’s still a 7.15% increase YoY, even after liquidating $120k of assets from this account. June 2020 saw $1,952.04 of income. This is where the effects of my large July selloff and dividend cuts from some of my larger holdings become very noticeable. Our dividend income decreased a whopping -34.74% QoQ. We are laser-focused on rebuilding our holdings to get back into plus territory here.

Dividend Income Received: September 2020

Ticker/Stock Name Income
Aflac (AFL) $1.40
Ares Capital (ARCC) $123.98
Broadcom (AVGO) $13.58
BP plc (BP) $50.65
Brookfield Property REIT (BPYU) $130.92
Dominion Energy (D) $9.87
Easterly Government Properties (DEA) $26.76
Enbridge (ENB) $108.52
Corning (GLW) $1.10
International Paper (IP) $5.13
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) $8.05
Keycorp (KEY) $55.50
Gladstone Land (LAND) $1.12
LyondellBasell (LYB) $87.15
McDonald’s (MCD) $6.25

The union representing nurses at Backus Hospital says contract negotiations are painfully slow and put parent company Hartford HealthCare on notice Friday that a brief strike is possible in 10 days.



a sign on the side of the street: Nurses at Backus Hospital in Norwich have warned of a possible two-day strike.


© Cloe Poisson/Hartford Courant/TNS
Nurses at Backus Hospital in Norwich have warned of a possible two-day strike.

The two sides have been in contract talks since June, according to an internal communication from the Backus Federation of Nurses, part of AFT Connecticut, which is bargaining on behalf of more than 400 nurses. Nurses at the Norwich hospital recently authorized a two-day strike and the notice is an attempt to ratchet up the pressure on hospital officials.

The union cited differences over personal protective equipment, pay and health insurance. It said the hospital insists it has the right to change insurance plans at any time without further negotiations and called it “clearly unacceptable.”

The nurses dispute statements by the hospital that personal protective equipment is always available. Nurses cope with shortages on every shift, the union said.

“The reuse and extended use of PPE is a work hazard and an infection control disaster in the making,” the union said.

Donna Handley, president of the hospital, said Backus will remain open if nurses walk off their job. “We are safe and we are prepared to care for you,” she said in a video.

“I am deeply, deeply disappointed in the nurses’ notification of a two-day strike,” Handey said. “I believe in my heart that we have done everything to avoid a strike.”

The hospital has met 19 times with the union and will “work around the clock to reach an agreement,” she said.

Parent company Hartford HealthCare said personal protective equipment “is — and has been — available to staff and patients 100% of the time.”

“We need to be