Satoshi Nakamoto proved a pseudonymous founder doesn’t have to be a deal breaker. Blue Kirby, however, has reminded cryptocurrency investors that fake names can still be a red flag. 

For those who didn’t spend last weekend on Crypto Twitter, Blue Kirby is the handle of a now-infamous figure in the decentralized finance (DeFi) community who appears to have absconded with some $1 million worth of ether (ETH).

As detailed in two worthwhile reads, DeFi community members allege Blue Kirby unfairly exercised influence over the Yearn.Finance ecosystem and then conducted a questionable initial coin offering (ICO) for a non-fungible token (NFT) marketplace called “Off-Blue.”

While the above sentence may sound to normies like so much word salad, the Blue Kirby fiasco marks the latest in a series of cautionary tales from 2020’s “DeFi Summer.” The episode shows how – absent compensating factors – permissionless technology, pseudonymous identities and borderless marketplaces can make a combustible mix. 

Without skin in the game, Blue Kirby had little incentive to act in community members’ best interest in the long term, crypto industry members said. And without a real name, they now have little recourse.

Out of the blue

According to Set Protocol’s Anthony Sassano, Blue Kirby created his online persona in the early summer months, riding on the back of Andre Cronje’s wildly successful robo-crypto hedge fund Yearn.

The pseudonymous token cheerleader quickly rose through the ranks of DeFi community members on Twitter as witnessed in community allocation of $7,000 per month for his tireless promotion of the YFI token.

Blue Kirby’s poor judgment came to light over time, beginning in late September with the botched release of Cronje’s Eminence, a new DeFi contract. Although Eminence had yet to be audited – as fits Cronje’s tagline: “I test in prod[uction]” – Blue Kirby encouraged users

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Ohio — Although it is uncertain what lies ahead, the city’s finances are looking a lot better these days after University Heights recently received an additional $461,000 in federal CARES Act money to help it deal with COVID-related expenses.

Gov. Mike DeWine, by signing into law House Bill 614 Oct. 1 allowed for the distribution of an additional $650 million to local governments across Ohio, bringing the total of money distributed to Ohio governments to $1.2 billion. The added $461,000 means that University Heights has now received just over $1.1 million in relief money.

“At first, we didn’t know if we’d get any (CARES Act) money,” said Mayor Michael Dylan Brennan. But, now that the city has been granted the money, Brennan, in his report at the start of Monday’s (Oct. 5) City Council meeting, told of how the aid has significantly closed the gap on what was once a projected $2-million deficit the city faced.

With the added funding, Brennan also plans to pay city employees money they had to forego by working four-day weeks over the course of 20 weeks, beginning in June. Brennan announced at the council meeting that the furloughs, that were to carry on until Oct. 31, were ending earlier than planned.

Initially, when faced with a possible $2-million shortfall, the administration and council worked to reduce the city’s spending by about $1 million. The reduction was made, among other things, by putting off this year’s road repair program, instituting the furloughs, and, due to the pandemic, not having to spend money on opening the city’s pools or in programming summer activities.

“While tax revenues remain down from this point last year,” Brennan reported to council, “for everything we have been through, we are down just 1 percent from this time last

Dear Moneyist,

I have been married for 42 years. He is a nice man, with a good personality and great social skills.

I do housework and take care of other appointments as needed. I cook, do small home repairs and painting, etc., and take care of all our financial planning. I worked in a medical career. He was in IT at a prestigious university.

I am getting older. He has this idea that I have all of this money. I do not. I manage it. Everything is in both our names. I manage all our finances. His income is five times my income.

He has always been very passive-aggressive. If I ask him for help with tasks, he acts very put-upon and I end up angry. He forgets things that I ask him to do on purpose, and is always late delivering.

The Moneyist:‘I feel very bitter’: My late father gave my sister power of attorney. She kept $100K of his savings. Should I pursue legal action?

He does not do any important little things for me. For instance, he pretends to forget to pick up flowers. We have not been to a movie together for the longest time. He is not interested. He has said he will NOT go out to dinner with me or travel.

He paid for a trip to Paris in 2018, then he wanted the money back. He takes no responsibility for managing our finances or our lives, but he loves to go to the gym and hike by himself. He does not chase women, gamble or drink heavily.

For the past 20 years, I have gone on little jaunts on my own to see old friends and family. I went to Boston last January for a weekend for my birthday. It was fun.

What will your financial situation look like after the next president is chosen?

On Nov. 3, the United States will hold an election to determine whether Former Vice President Joe Biden or President Donald Trump will hold the country’s highest office for the next four years. It will also decide the makeup of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

The outcome could shape many aspects of American life, and could affect your personal finances in profound ways. Here’s how.

1. Minimum wage could change

If elected president, Joe Biden has promised to raise the federal minimum wage, pledging to go as high as $15, up from the current $7.25 per hour. If the minimum wage goes up, millions of workers could get a raise. In fact, if the minimum pay rises, it’s likely that companies will have to increase the salaries of many other workers as well.

While this is good news, some economists as well as the Congressional Budget Office have warned that jobs could be lost if the minimum wage rises. Companies might embrace more automation or make other changes to lower labor costs in light of a higher minimum.

2. The stock market could go up (or down)

The election can affect the stock market in a number of ways, especially in the short term. When Trump was elected, for example, the market rose in light of the widespread view that he would be a pro-business president.

If Biden takes high office, however, he has pledged to raise the capital gains tax rate, which is the favorable tax rate that investors pay on long-term investments. If investors believe he’ll follow through, there may be a big sell-off before inauguration day as investors take profits at the lower tax rate.

3. Interest rates could change


In these troubled economic times, it’s more important than ever to reign in control over your money. But personal finance doesn’t come naturally to everyone. Fortunately, technology can help. If you’re struggling to keep your finances under control, it’s time to check out Toshl Finance.

Toshl is a simple, intuitive app that acts as a personal financial assistant. Whether you want to limit your spending, create a long-term budget, or just see how much money you actually have, Toshl has you covered. With Toshl, you can note all of your expenses, incomes, and financial plans with detailed budgets so you know how every penny is allocated. It integrates automatically with more than 13,000 banks and financial services around the world, allowing you to input bank or credit card data automatically or manually in real-time. It even supports data entry for cash expenses in any currency, including cryptocurrencies.




You can input automatically from your accounts, import from files, or enter numbers manually from an unlimited number of financial accounts. Each time you input a value, you can categorize it so you know just where it’s going. As you input values, Toshl provides useful graphs of how you use your money each month and allows you to budget for all expenses by using categories, tags, or accounts. Got recurring expenses? Set them up to hit your Toshl account automatically or set up reminders to make sure you remember to pay the bills on time.


With so many features, it’s no surprise Toshl has earned 4.5/5 stars on the Google Play Store and 4.7/5 stars on the App Store. Right now, you can get a 3-year subscription to a Toshl Finance Pro Plan for half off at just $29.99. Alternatively, you can unlock