(Reuters) – Tesla Inc <TSLA.O> Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Wednesday the company will produce Model Y with a new structural battery design and technology at its Berlin factory next year and that could result in a “significant production risk”.

The U.S. electric carmaker plans to manufacture a new version of its Model Y crossover vehicle, and possibly even battery cells at the site. Last month, Musk said that Tesla will use its Germany-based plant to demonstrate a radical overhaul of how its cars are built.

The company plans to start the production of Model Y at Gigafactory Berlin during the second half of 2021.

Tesla’s new battery cell – a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make – is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030.

The company’s new structural battery pack requires the new 4680 battery cells in order to work.

Musk said on Wednesday that it will take about two years for Tesla factories in Fremont and Shanghai to embrace the new technology.

“Fremont and Shanghai will transition in 2 years when new tech is proven,” Musk said in a tweet https://bit.ly/2I8Gam3.

The company said last week that it delivered 139,300 vehicles in the third quarter, a quarterly record for the electric carmaker.

Tesla’s delivery push has been supported by its new Shanghai factory, the only plant currently producing vehicles outside California, as it is also building a new vehicle and battery manufacturing facility near Berlin.

(Reporting by Sabahatjahan Contractor and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

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(Reuters) – Tesla Inc

Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Wednesday the company will produce Model Y with a new structural battery design and technology at its Berlin factory next year and that could result in a “significant production risk”.

The U.S. electric carmaker plans to manufacture a new version of its Model Y crossover vehicle, and possibly even battery cells at the site. Last month, Musk said that Tesla will use its Germany-based plant to demonstrate a radical overhaul of how its cars are built.

The company plans to start the production of Model Y at Gigafactory Berlin during the second half of 2021.

Tesla’s new battery cell – a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make – is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030.

The company’s new structural battery pack requires the new 4680 battery cells in order to work.

Musk said on Wednesday that it will take about two years for Tesla factories in Fremont and Shanghai to embrace the new technology.

“Fremont and Shanghai will transition in 2 years when new tech is proven,” Musk said in a tweet https://bit.ly/2I8Gam3.

The company said last week that it delivered 139,300 vehicles in the third quarter, a quarterly record for the electric carmaker.

Tesla’s delivery push has been supported by its new Shanghai factory, the only plant currently producing vehicles outside California, as it is also building a new vehicle and battery manufacturing facility near Berlin.

(Reporting by Sabahatjahan Contractor and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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China’s factory activity expanded at a faster pace in September helped by a return to exports growth after several months of shrinking sales, bolstering a steady recovery for the economy as it rebounds from the coronavirus shock.

The official manufacturing Purchasing Manager’s Index (PMI) rose to 51.5 in September from 51.0 in August, data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) showed on Wednesday, and remained above the 50-point mark that separates growth from contraction.

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Analysts had expected it to pick up slightly to 51.2.

A private survey, also released on the day, painted a similar picture of the manufacturing sector gaining momentum backed by stronger overseas demand.

China’s vast industrial sector is steadily returning to the levels seen before the pandemic paralyzed huge swathes of the economy, as pent-up demand, stimulus-driven infrastructure expansion and surprisingly resilient exports propel a recovery.

The official PMI, which largely focuses on big and state-owned firms, also showed the sub-index for new export orders stood at 50.8 in September, improving from 49.1 a month earlier and snapping eight months of declines.

GM’S CHINA SALES DROP 5% IN QUARTER, UNDERPERFORMS INDUSTRY RECOVERY

The signs of stronger overseas demand were also highlighted in the Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index(PMI), which focuses more on small and export-oriented firms. Its gauge for new export orders rose at the fastest pace in over three years.

“The higher official PMI for both manufacturing and non-manufacturing suggested China‚Äôs growth recovery is on track,” Nomura analysts said in emailed comments.

Recently, economic indicators ranging from trade to producer prices have all suggested a further pick up in the industrial sector. Profits at China’s

By Gabriel Crossley

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s factory activity extended solid growth in September, twin surveys showed, as the nation’s crucial exports engine revved up on improving overseas demand and underlined a steady economic recovery from the coronavirus shock.

The official manufacturing Purchasing Manager’s Index (PMI) rose to 51.5 in September from 51.0 in August, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Wednesday, remaining above the 50-point mark that separates growth from contraction for the seventh month.

Analysts had expected it to pick up slightly to 51.2.

A private survey, also released on the day, painted a similar picture of the manufacturing sector gaining momentum backed by stronger overseas demand.

China’s vast industrial sector is steadily returning to the levels seen before the pandemic paralysed huge swathes of the economy, as pent-up demand, stimulus-driven infrastructure expansion and surprisingly resilient exports propel a recovery.

The official PMI, which largely focuses on big and state-owned firms, also showed the sub-index for new export orders stood at 50.8 in September, improving from 49.1 a month earlier and snapping eight months of declines.

The signs of stronger overseas demand were also highlighted in the Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index(PMI), which focuses more on small and export-oriented firms. Its gauge for new export orders rose at the fastest pace in over three years.

Recently, economic indicators ranging from trade to producer prices have all suggested a further pick up in the industrial sector. Profits at China’s industrial firms extended robust growth in August to the fourth month, official data showed on Sunday.

Domestic demand also shows signs of broadening, with industrial output accelerating the most in eight months in August and retail sales growing for the first time this year.

Adding to the demand recovery from the coronavirus-induced slump, the official

BEIJING (Reuters) – Activity in China’s factories extended solid growth in September as payrolls expanded for the first time this year and overseas demand surged, a private survey showed on Monday, adding further momentum to an economy recovering from the coronavirus crisis.

The Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index(PMI) barely budged from the previous month, down fractionally to 53.0 from August’s 53.1, with the gauge staying above the 50-level that separates growth from contraction for the fifth consecutive month.

Analysts polled by Reuters had forecast the headline index to remain steady at 53.1.

China’s vast industrial sector is steadily returning to the levels seen before the pandemic paralysed the economy early this year. Pent-up demand, stimulus-driven infrastructure and surprisingly resilient exports have been the main drivers propelling the rebound.

“The recovery in manufacturing has maintained its momentum in the wake of the Covid-19 epidemic, with both the supply and demand surging,” Wang Zhe, senior economist at Caixin Insight Group, wrote in a note accompanying the Caixin survey release.

“The sharp rise in overseas demand has complemented the domestic market,” Wang said.

The Caixin survey showed total new orders recorded the strongest increase in September since January 2011, and the gauge for new export orders- which were hit hard by the global outbreak of the coronavirus – rose at the fastest pace in over three years.

Factory output softened slightly from August but remained strong, while input prices grew faster than prices charged, putting pressure on profit margins.

The Caixin survey focuses more on small and export-oriented firms while the official survey, also released earlier on Wednesday, largely tracks large companies and state-owned enterprises.

The private survey also showed Chinese factories expanded payrolls for the first time in ten months, although only slightly.

“However the job market remains worrisome, as the improvement