• Ads from politicians and campaigns accounted for at least 3% of Facebook’s estimated third-quarter U.S. revenue, according to data from Facebook’s ad library and the Center for Responsive Politics.
  • Google has dramatically limited targeting for political ads and Twitter banned them altogether, leaving Facebook as the only game in town for many campaigns.
  • “For better or worse — mostly worse — Facebook is the de facto place you go,” said Nick Fitz, CEO of online donations site Momentum, which powers the Defeat by Tweet campaign.



a man in a suit standing in front of a flat screen television: Former Vice President Joe Biden, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, wears a protective mask during a NowThis economic address seen on a smartphone in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, May 8, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Former Vice President Joe Biden, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, wears a protective mask during a NowThis economic address seen on a smartphone in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, May 8, 2020.

Anti-Trump super PAC Defeat by Tweet launched in June and has run up an advertising bill of more than $800,000 with an online campaign that encourages people to automatically donate money every time the president tweets.

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Thanks to Trump’s habitual tweeting, the group has parlayed its spending into about $3 million of fundraising. However, none of that ad spending has been on Twitter. Instead, it’s taking place exclusively on rival social media site Facebook.

Defeat by Tweet is far from alone. Scores of political candidates and outside groups have loaded up on Facebook spending ahead of next month’s election. That’s partly because Facebook reaches over a quarter-billion users in North America every month and has a family of popular apps, including Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp. But it’s also because many other ad-supported sites have retreated from politics, leaving Facebook as the only game in town. 

Google, the largest internet advertising company, limited the ability for campaigns to target users with political ads. Twitter banned political advertising altogether after CEO Jack Dorsey proclaimed last October that “political message reach

Facebook has filed building permits to expand its massive data center in North Fort Worth.

The social media giant has invested $1 billion so far on its huge tech campus in the AllianceTexas development. It recently made filings with the state to add to the 150-acre complex on State Highway 170 in Tarrant County. And a Fort Worth building permit was filed on September 28 listing DPR Construction as the general contractor.

The buildings already total 2.5 million square feet.

Facebook opened the first phase of the project in 2017 and has quietly added to the data center since then. The new filings show more than 277,000 square feet of additional construction.

The big data center project currently employs more than 200 people.

“We are proud to invest $1 billion into Fort Worth, but even prouder to see how our investments spur further economic benefits for the area, especially during this tough economic climate,” Holli Davies, Facebook community development manager, said in a statement. “Our data center investments go beyond economic growth to benefit the local environment and community.”

Facebook currently operates eight U.S. data centers and has five more in development. From 2017 to 2019, it invested $11.5 billion in these projects.

The first data center opened in Oregon in 2011.

This year the company has announced more than 4.8 million square feet of new U.S. data center construction.

Facebook said that since 2017 it has increased its data center employment by 164% to more than 850 people.

In Fort Worth, construction of the data center at its peak employed an average of 1,200 construction workers daily.

To support its data centers, Facebook says in a new report that it has invested in 987 megawatts of wind and solar electric generation that came online between 2017 and 2019.

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