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A report from USA Today’s Tom Schad revealed the 10 sports owners who have donated the most to political campaigns during the 2019-20 political cycle. The analysis revealed that owners throughout the six major American sports leagues donated upwards of $14.6 million to various political interests.

The numbers themselves come from federal campaign finance records. About two-thirds of the total is connected to the following 10 owners, who have given between $375,000 and $3,25 million throughout the past 20 months.

Leading the list is Charles B. Johnson, owner of the San Francisco Giants, who donated over $3.25 million in federal contributions. USA Today found that pretty much all of the Johnson’s money went towards Republican candidates, donating the maximum individual amount of $5,600 to over two dozen candidates. He also donated $435,200 to a political action committee called “Trump Victory.” 

Next is Woody Johnson of the New York Jets, who donated a hair under $2 million towards exclusively Republican campaigns. Johnson is not only a high donor, but he’s also the current United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. Dan DeVos, brother-in-law of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Orlando Magic owner, gave $1.2 million, with all but $10,000 going to Republican causes

Rounding out the top five is James Dolan, owner of the New York Knicks and New York Rangers, and U.S. Senator Kelly Loeffler, owner of the Atlanta Dream. Dolan threw heavy financial support behind Trump during the last election, and this cycle seems no different. Loeffler, a sitting U.S. Senator, has donated over $500,000, with all but $5,000 going to Republican causes, including to the campaigns of her colleagues in the Senate. The Georgia congresswoman came under fire from the WNBA and Dream players earlier this year for comments she made about the Black Lives Matter movement.

As a generation, millennials have been hit hard financially by the coronavirus pandemic. But although some may have moved back in with their parents or say the pandemic has upended their financial security, they’re also the generation that’s giving back the most. 



a group of people standing in front of a building: The Salvation Army volunteers hand food and face masks to people in need in Chelsea as the city continues re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on September 24, 2020 in New York City.


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The Salvation Army volunteers hand food and face masks to people in need in Chelsea as the city continues re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on September 24, 2020 in New York City.

Nearly 3 out of 4 millennials (defined here as those ages 25 to 34) have sent some kind of financial aid to family or friends or donated to a nonprofit since the Covid-19 pandemic began, according to payment app Zelle’s September Consumer Payment Behaviors report. The report is based on a survey of over 600 interviews a month of adults ages 18 to 72.

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That’s the highest rate among any of the generations polled. Gen Z (ages 18 to 24) had the second highest giving rate at 66%, followed by Gen X (ages 35 to 54) and baby boomers (ages 55 to 72). 

Overall, 64% of Americans say they’ve sent sent financial aid at least once since the start of the pandemic, Zelle’s report finds. In fact, there’s been over $11.9 billion donated globally to Covid-19 related causes during the first half of 2020, according to an August report by Candid and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which tracks global philanthropic activity. 



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Finding the right place to give

If you have extra money in your budget and want to donate, whether it’s to cause that’s related to the pandemic or one that’s focused on broader issues such as the environment or social justice, it’s all about finding the right place. And

As a generation, millennials have been hit hard financially by the coronavirus pandemic. But although some may have moved back in with their parents or say the pandemic has upended their financial security, they’re also the generation that’s giving back the most. 

Nearly 3 out of 4 millennials (defined here as those ages 25 to 34) have sent some kind of financial aid to family or friends or donated to a nonprofit since the Covid-19 pandemic began, according to payment app Zelle’s September Consumer Payment Behaviors report. The report is based on a survey of over 600 interviews a month of adults ages 18 to 72.

That’s the highest rate among any of the generations polled. Gen Z (ages 18 to 24) had the second highest giving rate at 66%, followed by Gen X (ages 35 to 54) and baby boomers (ages 55 to 72). 

Overall, 64% of Americans say they’ve sent sent financial aid at least once since the start of the pandemic, Zelle’s report finds. In fact, there’s been over $11.9 billion donated globally to Covid-19 related causes during the first half of 2020, according to an August report by Candid and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which tracks global philanthropic activity. 

Finding the right place to give

If you have extra money in your budget and want to donate, whether it’s to cause that’s related to the pandemic or one that’s focused on broader issues such as the environment or social justice, it’s all about finding the right place. And that’s different for everyone, says Eric Roberge, a certified financial planner and founder of Boston-based wealth management firm Beyond Your Hammock.

“Find that cause where you can make the most impact, whether that’s giving some money directly to another individual or it’s going through a nonprofit or